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Full text of "1990 Census of Population and Housing. Population and Housing Characteristics for Census Tracts and Block Numbering Areas. Florence, SC"

1990 



CENSUS OF 
POPULATION 
AND HOUSING 



SERIES CPH (3) 



CENSUS TRACTS 
ANDBNA'S 



LIBRARY 
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 






V 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
Economics and Statistics Administration 
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



MWEkM 



1990 CPH-3-152 



CENSUS '90 




1990 Census of 
Population and Housing 

Population and Housing 

Characteristics for 

Census Tracts and Block 

Numbering Areas 

Florence, SC MSA 



BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 
LIBRARY 







ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 



The Decennial Planning Division, Susan M. Miskura, Chief, coordinated 
and directed all census operations. Patricia A. Berman, Assistant Division 
Chief for Content and Data Products, directed the development and 
implementation of the 1990 Census Tabulation and Publication Program. 
Other assistant division chiefs were Robert R. Bair, Rachel F. Brown, 
James L. Dinwiddie, Allan A. Stephenson, and Edwin B. Wagner, Jr. 
The following branch chiefs made significant contributions: Cheryl R. 
Landman, Adolfo L. Paez, A. Edward Pike, and William A. Starr. Other 
important contributors were Linda S. Brudvig, Cindy S. Easton, Avis L. 
Foote, Carolyn R. Hay, Douglas M. Lee, Gloria J. Porter, and A. Nishea 
Quash. 

The Decennial Operations Division, Arnold A. Jackson, Chief, was 
responsible for processing and tabulating census data. Assistant division 
chiefs were: Donald R. Dalzell, Kenneth A. Riccini, Billy E. Stark, and 
James E. Steed. Processing offices were managed by Alfred Cruz, Jr., 
Earle B. Knapp, Jr., Judith N. Petty, Mark M. Taylor, Russell L. 
Valentine, Jr., Carol A. Van Horn, and C. Kemble Worley. The following 
branch chiefs made significant contributions: Jonathan G. Ankers, 
Sharron S. Baucom, Catharine W. Burt, Vickie L. Cotton, Robert J. 
Hemmig, George H. McLaughlin, Carol M. Miller, Lorraine D. Neece, 
Peggy S. Payne, William L. Peil, Cotty A. Smith, Dennis W. Stoudt, and 
Richard R. Warren. Other important contributors were Eleanor I. Banks, 
Miriam R. Barton, Danny L. Burkhead, J. Kenneth Butler, Jr., Albert A. 
Csellar, Donald H. Danbury, Judith A. Dawson, Donald R. Dwyer, 
Beverly B. Fransen, Katherine H. Gilbert, Lynn A. Hollabaugh, Ellen B. 
Katzoff, Randy M. Klear, Norman W. Larsen, Peter J. Long, Sue Love, 
Patricia O. Madson, Mark J. Matsko, John R. Murphy, Dan E. Philipp, 
Eugene M. Rashlich, Willie T. Robertson, Barbara A. Rosen, Sharon A. 
Schoch, Imelda B. Severdia, Diane J. Simmons, Emmett F. Spiers, 
Johanne M. Stovall, M. Lisa Sylla, and Jess D. Thompson. 

The Housing and Household Economic Statistics Division, Daniel H. 
Weinberg, Chief, developed the questionnaire content, designed the data 
tabulations, and reviewed the data for the economic and housing charac- 
teristics. Gordon W. Green, Jr., Assistant Division Chief for Economic 
Characteristics, and Leonard J. Norry, Assistant Division Chief for Hous- 
ing Characteristics, directed the development of this work. The following 
branch chiefs made significant contributions: William A. Downs, Peter J. 
Fronczek, Patricia A. Johnson, Enrique J. Lamas, Charles T. Nelson, 
and Thomas S. Scopp. Other important contributors were Eleanor 
F. Baugher, Jeanne C. Benetti, Robert L. Bennefield, Robert W. 
Bonnette, William S. Chapin, Higinio Feliciano, Timothy S. Grail, 
Cynthia J. Harpine, Selwyn Jones, Mary C. Kirk, Richard G. Kreinsen, 
Gordon H. Lester, Mark S. Littman, Wilfred T. Masumura, John M. 
McNeil, Diane C. Murphy, George F. Patterson, Thomas J. Palumbo, 
Kirby G. Posey, John Priebe, Anne D. Smoler, and Carmina F. Young. 

The Population Division, Paula J. Schneider, Chief, developed the 
questionnaire content, designed the data tabulations, and reviewed the 
data for the demographic and social characteristics of the population. 
Philip N. Fulton, Assistant Division Chief for Census Programs, directed 
the development of this work. Other assistant division chiefs were 
Nampeo R. McKenney and Arthur J. Norton. The following branch and 
staff chiefs made significant contributions: Jorge H. del Pinal, Campbell J. 
Gibson, Roderick J. Harrison, Donald J. Hernandez, Jane H. Ingold, 
Martin T. O'Connell, Marie Pees, J. Gregory Robinson, Phillip A. 
Salopek, Paul M. Siegel, Robert C. Speaker, Gregory K. Spencer, and 
Cynthia M. Taeuber. Other important contributors were Celia G. Boertlein, 
Rosalind R. Bruno, Janice A. Costanzo, Rosemarie C. Cowan, Arthur 
R. Cresce, Larry G. Curran, Carmen DeNavas, Robert O. Grymes, 
Kristin A. Hansen, Mary C. Hawkins, Rodger V. Johnson, Michael J. 
Levin, Edna L. Paisano, Sherry B. Pollock, Stanley J. Rolark, A. Dianne 
Schmidley, Denise I. Smith, and Nancy L. Sweet. 

The Data User Services Division, Gerard C. lannelli, then Chief, 
directed the development of data product dissemination and information to 
increase awareness, understanding, and use of census data. Marie G. 
Argana, Assistant Chief for Data User Services, directed preparation of 
electronic data products and their dissemination. Alfonso E. Mirabal, 
Assistant Chief for Group Information and Advisory Services, directed 
activities related to the National Services Program, State Data Centers, and 
preparation of training materials. The following branch chiefs made signif- 
icant contributions: Deborah D. Barrett, Frederick G. Bohme, Larry W. 



Carbaugh, James P. Curry, Samuel H. Johnson, John C. Kavaliunas, 
and Forrest B. Williams. Other important contributors were Molly 
Abramowitz, Celestin J. Aguigui, Barbara J. Aldrich, Delores A. 
Baldwin, Albert R. Barros, Geneva A. Burns, Carmen D. Campbell, 
James R. Clark, Virginia L. Collins, George H. Dailey, Jr., Barbara L. 
Hatchl, Theresa C. Johnson, Paul T. Manka, John D. McCall, Jo Ann 
Norris, David M. Pemberton, Sarabeth Rodriguez, Charles J. Wade, 
Joyce J. Ware, and Gary M. Young. 

The Geography Division, Robert W. Marx, Chief, directed and coor- 
dinated the census mapping and geographic activities. Jack R. George, 
Assistant Division Chief for Geoprocessing, directed the planning and 
development of the TIGER System and related software. Robert A. 
LaMacchia, Assistant Division Chief for Planning, directed the planning 
and implementation of processes for defining 1990 census geographic 
areas. Silla G. Tomasi, Assistant Division Chief for Operations, managed 
the planning and implementation of 1990 census mapping applications 
using the TIGER System. The following branch chiefs made significant 
contributions: Frederick R. Broome, Charles E. Dingman, Linda M. 
Franz, David E. Galdi, Dan N. Harding, Donald I. Hirschfeld, David B. 
Meixler, Peter Rosenson, Joel Sobel, Brian Swanhart, and Richard 
Trois. Other important contributors were Gerard Boudriault, 
Desmond J. Carron, Anthony W. Costanzo, Paul W. Daisey, 
Beverly A. Davis, Carl S. Hantman, Christine J. Kinnear, Terence D. 
McDowell, Linda M. Pike, Rose J. A. Quarato, Lourdes Ramirez, 
Gavin H. Shaw, Daniel L. Sweeney, Timothy F. Trainor, Phyllis S. 
Wiilette, and Walter E. Yergen. 

The Statistical Support Division, John H. Thompson, Chief, directed 
the application of mathematical statistical techniques in the design and 
conduct of the census. John S. Linebarger, Assistant Division Chief for 
Quality Assurance, directed the development and implementation of 
operational and software quality assurance. Henry F. Woltman, Assis- 
tant Division Chief for Census Design, directed the development and 
implementation of sample design, disclosure avoidance, weighting, and 
variance estimation. Howard Hogan and David V. Bateman were 
contributing assistant division chiefs. The following branch chiefs made 
significant contributions: Florence H. Abramson, Deborah H. Griffin, 
Richard A. Griffin, Lawrence I. Iskow, and Michael L. Mersch. Other 
important contributors were Linda A. Flores-Baez, Larry M. Bates, 
Somonica L. Green, James E. Hartman, Steven D. Jarvis, Alfredo 
Navarro, Eric L. Schindler, Carolyn T. Swan, and Glenn D. White. 

The 1990 Census Redistricting Data Office, Marshall L. Turner, Jr., 
Chief, assisted by Cathy L. Talbert, directed the development and 
implementation of the 1990 Census Redistricting Data Program. 

The Administrative and Publications Services Division, Walter C. 
Odom, Chief, provided direction for the census administrative services, 
publications, printing, and graphics functions. Michael G. Garland was a 
contributing assistant division chief. The following branch and staff chiefs 
made significant contributions: Bernard E. Baymler, Albert W. Cosner, 
Gary J. Lauffer, Gerald A. Mann, Clement B. Nettles, Russell Price, 
and Barbara J. Stanard. Other important contributors were Barbara M. 
Abbott, Robert J. Brown, David M. Coontz, and John T. Overby. 

The Data Preparation Division, Joseph S. Harris, Chief, provided 
management of a multi-operational facility including kit preparation, 
procurement, warehousing and supply, and census processing activities. 
Plummer Alston, Jr., and Patricia M. Clark were assistant division 
chiefs. 

The Field Division, Stanley D. Matchett, Chief, directed the census 
data collection and associated field operations. Richard L. Bitzer, 
Richard F. Blass, Karl K. Kindel, and John W. Marshall were assistant 
division chiefs. Regional office directors were William F. Adams, John E. 
Bell, LaVerne Collins, Dwight P. Dean, Arthur G. Dukakis, Sheila H. 
Grimm, William F. Hill, James F. Holmes, Stanley D. Moore, Marvin L. 
Postma, John E. Reeder, and Leo C. Schilling. 

The Personnel Division, David P. Warner, Chief, provided manage- 
ment direction and guidance to the staffing, planning pay systems, and 
employee relations programs for the census. Colleen A. Woodard was 
the assistant chief. 

The Technical Services Division, C. Thomas DiNenna, Chief, designed, 
developed, deployed, and produced automated technology for census 
data processing. 



mm 5oi 

1990 CPH-3-152 
1990 

1990 Census of t 
Population and Housing 

Population and Housing 

Characteristics for 

Census Tracts and Block 

Numbering Areas 

Florence, SC MSA 



BUREAU OF m census 
LIBRARY S 



Issued June 1993 






% 







U.S. Department of Commerce 

Ronald H. Brown, Secretary 

John Rollwagen, Deputy Secretary 

Economics and Statistics Administration 

Jeffrey Mayer, Acting Under Secretary 

for Economic Affairs 

BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 
Harry A. Scarr, Acting Director 



^2225^ 




^5sss«* x 




Economics and Statistics 

Administration 
Jeffrey Mayer, Acting Under Secretary 
for Economic Affairs 



BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 
Harry A. Scarr, Acting Director 

Charles D. Jones, Associate Director for 

Decennial Census 
William P. Butz, Associate Director for 

Demographic Programs 
Bryant Benton, Associate Director for 

Field Operations 
Clifford J. Parker, Acting Associate Director 

for Administration 
Peter A. Bounpane, Assistant Director for 

Decennial Census 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, 

Washington, DC 20402. 



CONTENTS 






Page 

List of Statistical Tables iv 

How to Use This Census Report 1-1 

Table Finding Guide 11-1 

User Notes 111-1 

List of Census Tract Reports and Census Tract Comparability Tables IV— 1 

Statistical Tables (For detailed list of statistical tables, see page iv.) 1 



APPENDIXES 

A. Area Classifications A-1 

B. Definitions of Subject Characteristics B-1 

C. Accuracy of the Data C-1 

D. Collection and Processing Procedures D-1 

E. Facsimiles of Respondent Instructions and Questionnaire Pages E-1 

F. Data Products and User Assistance F-1 

G. Maps G-1 






CONTENTS Mi 



LIST OF STATISTICAL TABLES 



[An asterisk (*) indicates that the table was omitted because there were no qualifying geographic area(s) or population group(s) ] 



Table 




Page 


Table 




Page 


1. 


General Characteristics of Persons: 




12. 


Occupancy, Utilization, and Financial 






1990 


1 




Characteristics of Housing Units 






Census Tract or Block Numbering 






With an American Indian, Eskimo, 






Area 






or Aleut Householder: 1990 

Census Tract or Block Numbering 


* 


2. 


General Characteristics of White 
Persons: 1990 


8 




Area 






Census Tract or Block Numbering 




13. 


Occupancy, Utilization, and Financial 






Area 






Characteristics of Housing Units 
With an Asian or Pacific Islander 
Householder: 1990 


* 


3. 


General Characteristics of Black 
Persons: 1990 

Census Tract or Block Numbering 


12 




Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 






Area 




14. 


Occupancy, Utilization, and Financial 
Characteristics of Housing Units 




4. 


General Characteristics of American 






With an Hispanic Origin 






Indian, Eskimo, or Aleut Persons: 






Householder: 1990 


40 




1990 


* 




Census Tract or Block Numbering 






Census Tract or Block Numbering 






Area 






Area 




15. 


Occupancy, Utilization, and Financial 




5. 


General Characteristics of Asian or 






Characteristics of Housing Units 






Pacific Islander Persons: 1990 


* 




With a White, Not of Hispanic 






Census Tract or Block Numbering 






Origin Householder: 1990 


41 




Area 






Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 




6. 


General Characteristics of Hispanic 












Origin Persons: 1990 


18 


16. 


Selected Ancestry Groups and 






Census Tract or Block Numbering 






Persons in Selected Hispanic Origin 






Area 






Groups: 1990 

Census Tract or Block Numbering 


42 


7. 


General Characteristics of White, 
Not of Hispanic Origin Persons: 






Area 






1990 


19 


17. 


Social Characteristics of Persons: 






Census Tract or Block Numbering 






1990 


47 




Area 






Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 




8. 


Race and Hispanic Origin: 1990 

Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 


20 


18. 


Labor Force and Disability 
Characteristics of Persons: 1990 

Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 


54 


9. 


Occupancy, Utilization, and Financial 












Characteristics of Housing Units: 
1990 

Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 


25 


19. 


Income and Poverty Status in 1989: 
1990 

Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 


61 


10. 


Occupancy, Utilization, and Financial 
Characteristics of Housing Units 




20. 


Social and Labor Force 
Characteristics of White Persons: 






With a White Householder: 1990 


32 




1990 


68 




Census Tract or Block Numbering 






Census Tract or Block Numbering 






Area 






Area 




11. 


Occupancy, Utilization, and Financial 
Characteristics of Housing Units 




21. 


Occupation, Income in 1989, and 
Poverty Status in 1989 of White 






With a Black Householder: 1990 


35 




Persons: 1990 


72 




Census Tract or Block Numbering 






Census Tract or Block Numbering 






Area 






Area 





IV 



CONTENTS 



Table 




Page 


Table 




Page 


22. 


Social and Labor Force 




33. 


Financial Characteristics of Housing 






Characteristics of Black Persons: 






Units: 1990 


92 




1990 


76 




Census Tract or Block Numbering 






Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 






Area 








34. 


Selected Structural Characteristics 




23. 


Occupation, Income in 1989, and 






of Housing Units With a White 






Poverty Status in 1989 of Black 






Householder: 1990 


99 




Persons: 1990 


80 




Census Tract or Block Numbering 






Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 






Area 








35. 


Financial Characteristics of Housing 




24. 


Social and Labor Force 






Units With a White Householder: 






Characteristics of American Indian, 






1990 


103 




Eskimo, or Aleut Persons: 1990 


* 




Census Tract or Block Numbering 






Census Tract or Block Numbering 






Area 






Area 




36. 


Selected Structural Characteristics 




25. 


Occupation, Income in 1989, and 






of Housing Units With a Black 






Poverty Status in 1989 of American 






Householder: 1990 


107 




Indian, Eskimo, or Aleut Persons: 






Census Tract or Block Numbering 






1990 


* 




Area 






Census Tract or Block Numbering 












Area 




37. 


Financial Characteristics of Housing 
Units With a Black Householder: 




26. 


Social and Labor Force 
Characteristics of Asian or Pacific 






1990 

Census Tract or Block Numbering 


111 




Islander Persons: 1990 


* 




Area 






Census Tract or Block Numbering 












Area 




38. 


Selected Structural Characteristics 
of Housing Units With an American 




27. 


Occupation, Income in 1989, and 






Indian, Eskimo, or Aleut 






Poverty Status in 1989 of Asian or 






Householder: 1990 


* 




Pacific Islander Persons: 1990 


* 




Census Tract or Block Numbering 






Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 




39. 


Area 
Financial Characteristics of Housing 




28. 


Social and Labor Force 
Characteristics of Hispanic Origin 






Units With American Indian, 
Eskimo, or Aleut Householder: 






Persons: 1990 


* 




1990 


* 




Census Tract or Block Numbering 






Census Tract or Block Numbering 






Area 






Area 




29. 


Occupation, Income in 1989, and 
Poverty Status in 1989 of Hispanic 




40. 


Selected Structural Characteristics 
of Housing Units With an Asian or 






Origin Persons: 1990 


* 




Pacific Islander Householder: 1990 


* 




Census Tract or Block Numbering 






Census Tract or Block Numbering 






Area 






Area 




30. 


Social and Labor Force 
Characteristics of White, Not of 




41. 


Financial Characteristics of Housing 
Units With an Asian or Pacific 






Hispanic Origin Persons: 1990 


* 




Islander Householder: 1990 


* 




Census Tract or Block Numbering 






Census Tract or Block Numbering 






Area 






Area 




31. 


Occupation, Income in 1989, and 
Poverty Status in 1989 of White, 




42. 


Selected Structural Characteristics 
of Housing Units With an Hispanic 






Not of Hispanic Origin Persons: 






Origin Householder: 1990 


* 




1990 


* 




Census Tract or Block Numbering 






Census Tract or Block Numbering 






Area 






Area 




43. 


Financial Characteristics of Housing 




32. 


Selected Structural Characteristics 






Units With an Hispanic Origin 






of Housing Units: 1990 


85 




Householder: 1990 


* 




Census Tract or Block Numbering 






Census Tract or Block Numbering 






Area 






Area 








3 

Tl 
H 

c 



CONTENTS 



Table 



44. 



Page 



Selected Structural Characteristics 
of Housing Units With a White, Not 
of Hispanic Origin Householder: 
1990 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Table 
45. 



Page 



46. 



Financial Characteristics of Housing 
Units With a White, Not of Hispanic 
Origin Householder: 1990 

Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 

Percent of Persons and Housing 
Units in Sample: 1990 

Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



116 



VI 



CONTENTS 



HOW TO USE THIS CENSUS REPORT 



CONTENTS 

Contents of the Appendixes 1-3 

Census Tract Comparability Tables 1-3 

How to Find Race/Hispanic Origin Detail and 

Subject-Matter Data 1-1 

How to Use the Statistical Tables I-2 

User Notes I-3 



INTRODUCTION 

Data from the 1990 census are presented in several 
different report series. These series are published under 
the following three subject titles: 

1. 1990 Census of Population (1990 CP) 

2. 1990 Census of Housing (1990 CH) 

3. 1990 Census of Population and Housing (1990 CPH) 

The types of data and the geographic areas shown in 
reports differ from one series to another. In most series, 
there is one report for each State, the District of Columbia, 
Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands of the United States 
(Virgin Islands), plus a United States summary report. 
Some series include reports for American Indian and 
Alaska Native areas, metropolitan areas, and urbanized 
areas. See appendix F for detailed information about the 
various report series; additional 1990 census data prod- 
ucts such as computer tapes, microfiche, and laser disks; 
other related materials; and sources of assistance. 

The data from the 1990 census were derived from a 
limited number of basic questions asked of the entire 
population and about every housing unit (referred to as the 
100-percent questions), and from additional questions 
asked of a sample of the population and housing units 
(referred to as the sample questions). Two primary ver- 
sions of questionnaires were used: a short form containing 
only the 100-percent questions and a long form containing 
both the 100-percent questions and the additional sample 
questions. Appendix E presents facsimiles of the question- 
naire pages and the respondent instructions used to 
collect the data included in this report. Appendix F lists the 
subjects that are covered by the 1 00-percent and sample 
components of the 1990 census. 

Legal provision for this census, which was conducted as 
of April 1, 1990, was made in the Act of Congress of 
August 31, 1954 (amended August 1957, December 1975, 
and October 1976), which is codified in Title 13, United 
States Code. 



HOW TO FIND RACE/HISPANIC ORIGIN DETAIL 
AND SUBJECT-MATTER DATA 

This report includes a table finding guide to assist the 
user in locating those statistical tables that contain the 
data that are needed. The table finding guide lists alpha- 
betically, the subjects shown in this report by race groups, 
Hispanic origin, and White, not of Hispanic origin. To 
determine which tables in this report show data for a 
particular topic, find the subject in the left-hand column of 
the table finding guide and then look across the columns 
using the headings at the top for specific race groups or 
persons of Hispanic origin. Below is an example of a table 
finding guide. 

TABLE FINDING GUIDE 

Subject* by Race Groups, Httpartfc Origin, and Whfle, Not of Hispanic Origin and Table Nunter 

(Subjects covered In thb report are shown on the left side, and race groups, Hispanic oriofc end Whle, not of Hlapanlc origin are shewn at the top. 
For deMJora and explanations of subject characteristics, see append* B) 



Subject 


Total 


White 


Black 


American Indian, 
Eskimo, or Aleut 


Asian or 

Pa cfc Islander 


Hlepanic origin 
(of any race) 


Whle, not of 
Hlapanlc origin 


FWuUTONCHWWCreiSTICS 
Age 


1 

16 
18 

1 

18 
17 

1 

17 
8,16 

1 

19 
18 
17 
18 

17 
1 

17 
18 
17 
17 
19 
8 
17 
17 
1 

17 
18 
18 

32 
32 

9 
33 
32 
32 
32 

9 

33 
9 
9 
32 
9 
32 
32 
32 
9 
9 
32 
9 
9 
32 
32 
32 
1 


2 

2 

20 
20 
2 
20 

2 
21 

20 
20 

20 
2 
20 
21 
20 
20 
21 

20 
20 
2 

20 

34 

10 
35 
34 
34 
34 
10 

35 
10 
10 
34 
10 
34 
34 
34 
10 
10 

10 
10 
34 
34 
34 


3 

3 
22 
22 

3 
22 

3 
23 

22 
22 

22 

3 
22 

23 
22 
22 

23 

22 
22 
3 

22 

36 

11 
37 
36 

38 
36 
11 

37 
11 
11 
36 

11 
36 
36 
36 
11 
11 

11 
11 
36 
36 
36 


4 

4 

24 
24 
4 
24 

4 

25 

24 
24 

24 
4 
24 
25 

24 
24 

25 

24 
24 

4 

24 

38 

12 
39 
38 
38 
38 
12 

39 
12 
12 
38 
12 
38 
38 
38 
12 
12 

12 
12 

38 
38 
38 


5 

5 
26 
26 

5 
28 

5 
27 

28 
26 

26 
5 
26 
27 

26 
26 
27 

26 

26 
5 

26 

40 

13 

41 
40 
40 
40 
13 

41 
13 
13 
40 
13 
40 
40 
40 
13 
13 

13 
13 
40 
40 
40 


6 

6 
28 
28 

6 
28 

6 
29 

28 
28 

28 
6 
28 
29 
28 
28 
29 

28 

28 
6 

28 

42 

14 
43 
42 
42 
42 
14 

43 
14 
14 
42 
14 
42 
42 
42 
14 
14 

14 
14 
42 
42 
42 


7 












7 


DkabiSy 


X 




X 


Family type by presence of own chldren 

Ferity 


7 

30 








7 




31 








X 




X 


Language spoken at home and abBy to 


X 




7 




X 




31 


Place ol be* 


X 




X 




31 








X 




X 


Sex 


7 


Urban, rural, and farm residence (persons) .... 
Work etatus in 1989 


X 






HOUSING CHARACTERISTICS 


44 








15 




45 




44 




44 




44 




15 


Mortgage status and selected monthly owner 


45 




15 




15 




44 




15 




44 




44 




44 




15 




15 


Urban, rural, and farm residence (housing uncs). 


15 


Value 


15 




44 




44 




44 


LAND AREA 









. Not appfcabfe lor thb report. 



HOW TO USE THIS CENSUS REPORT 



1-1 



HOW TO USE THE STATISTICAL TABLES 
Parts of a Statistical Table 

The census data included in printed reports are arranged 
in tables. Each table includes four major parts: (1) heading, 
(2) boxhead, (3) stub, and (4) data field. A typical census 
report table is illustrated below. 

The heading consists of the table number, title, and 
headnote. The table number indicates the position of the 
table within the report, while the title is a brief statement 
indicating the classification, nature, and time reference of 
the data presented in the table. The headnote is enclosed 
in brackets and is located under the title. It contains 
statements that qualify, explain, or provide information 
pertaining to the entire table. In some tables showing racial 
and Hispanic origin groups, the headnote includes infor- 
mation that data are presented only when certain population- 
size criteria (thresholds) are met. (For more information on 
thresholds, see the "User Notes" section.) 

The boxhead is under the heading. This portion of the 
table, which contains the individual column heads or 
captions, describes the data in each vertical column. In the 
boxhead of many tables, a spanner appears across and 
above two or more column heads or across two or more 
lower spanners. The purpose of a spanner is to classify or 
qualify items below it or separate the table into identifiable 
blocks in terms of major aspects of the data. 



PARTS OF A STATISTICAL TABLE 



Table number and (Me 



Headnote 



^■w* m»iWii iIm ,i,>i Haul 




Column head 
Spanner 



an «- 

.5 .: 

•a 

.8 ..' 



•B *B 



S3 !S 

s ,z 



'3 'ft 

sat *m 
mm iav 
• » tm 

u ■< 

:s is 



IS 



!S "S 



$a 



!S 



*> 



Boxhead 



Data 

field 



Page number 
and State name 



I 

Report title 



The stub is located at the left edge of the table. It 
includes a listing of line or row captions or descriptions. At 
the top of the stub is the stubhead. The stubhead is 
considered to be an extension of the table title and usually 
shows generic geographic area designations and restric- 
tions. 

In the stub, several features are used to help the user 
better understand the contents of the table. Usually, a 
block of data lines is preceded by a sidehead. The 
sidehead, similar to a spanner, describes and classifies the 
stub entries following it. The use of indentation in a stub 
indicates the relationship of one data line to another. 
Indented data lines represent subcategories that in most 
instances, sum to a total. Occasionally in tables, it is 
desirable to show one or more single-line subcategories 
that do not sum to the total. The unit of measure, such as 
dollars, is shown when it is not clear from the general 
wording of the data line. 

The data field is that part of the table that contains the 
data. It extends from the bottom of the boxhead to the 
bottom of the table and from the right of the stub to the 
right-hand edge of the page. 

Both geographic and subject-matter terms appear in 
tables. It is important to read the definitions of the terms 
used in the tables because census terms often are defined 
in special ways that reflect the manner in which the 
questions were asked and the data were tabulated. Defi- 
nitions of geographic terms are provided in appendix A. 
Subject-matter terms are defined in appendix B. 



Symbols and Geographic Abbreviations 

The following symbols are used in the tables 
explanations of subjects covered in this report: 



and 



A dash "-" represents zero, a figure that rounds to less 
than 0.1, or a percent that rounds to less than 0.1. 

Three dots "..." mean not applicable. 

(NA) means not available. 

The prefix "r" indicates that the count has been revised 
since publication of 1980 reports or that the area was 
erroneously omitted or not shown in the correct geo- 
graphic relationship in the 1980 census reports. This 
symbol appears only in the 1990 CPH-2, Population and 
Housing Unit Counts reports. 

A dagger "t" next to the name of a geographic area 
indicates that there has been a geographic change(s) 
(for example, an annexation or detachment, a new 
incorporation, or a name change) since the information 
published for the 1 980 census for that area. This symbol 
appears only in the 1 990 CPH-2, Population and Hous- 
ing Unit Counts reports. The geographic change infor- 
mation for the entities in a Sta^e is shown in the "User 
Notes" section of 1990 CPH-2, Population and Housing 



1-2 



HOW TO USE THIS CENSUS REPORT 



Unit Counts report, for that State. The information for all 
States appears in the "User Notes" section of the 
technical documentation for Summary Tape Files 1 
and 3. 

• A plus sign "+" or a minus sign "-" following a figure 
denotes that the median falls in the initial or terminal 
category of an open-ended distribution. (For more infor- 
mation on medians, see the discussion under "Derived 
Measures" in appendix B.) 

• A minus sign "-" preceding a figure denotes decrease. 

The following geographic abbreviations are used in the 
tables and explanations of subjects covered in this report: 

• A "(pt.)" next to the name of a geographic area in a 
hierarchical presentation indicates that the geographic 
entity is only partially located in the superior geographic 
entity. For example, a "(pt.)" next to a place name in a 
county subdivision-place hierarchy indicates that the 
place is located in more than one county subdivision. 
(Places also may be "split" by county, congressional 
district, urban/rural, metropolitan area, voting district, 
and other geographic boundaries, depending on the 
presentation.) Other geographic entities also can be 
"split" by a higher-level entity. The exception is a 
tabulation block, which is unique within all geographic 
entities in census products. 

BG is block group. 

BNA is block numbering area. 

CDP is census designated place. 

CMSA is consolidated metropolitan statistical area. 

MA is metropolitan area. 

MSA is metropolitan statistical area. 

PMSA is primary metropolitan statistical area. 

TDSA is tribal designated statistical area. 

TJSA is tribal jurisdiction statistical area. 

unorg. is unorganized territory. 

VTD is voting district. 

Census tables often include derived measures such as 
medians, means, percents, and ratios. More detailed infor- 
mation about derived measures is provided in appendix B. 

CENSUS TRACT COMPARABILITY TABLES 

A listing of all the census tract reports in this series and 
information on changes in the boundaries of census tracts 
between 1 980 and 1 990 for the area covered in this report 
appear on page IV-1, directly before the statistical tables. 

The census tract comparability table shows the 1980 
components of 1 990 census tracts and 1 990 components 
of 1980 census tracts, as relevant, for: (1) 1980 census 
tracts that were split into two or more 1 990 census tracts; 
(2) 1 980 census tracts that were combined into new 1 990 
census tracts; (3) 1980 census tracts in areas with new 



numbering systems for 1990; and (4) those census tracts 
with boundary changes between 1980 and 1990 that 
affected 2.5 percent or more of the population of the 
census tract. 

A census tract will not appear in the comparability tables 
if: (1) no change occurred between 1980 and 1990; 
(2) boundary revisions affected fewer than 2.5 percent of 
the persons and that was the only change that occurred to 
that census tract; (3) the area has block numbering areas 
for 1990; or (4) an area where census tracts were defined 
for the first time in 1990. 

USER NOTES 

User notes include corrections, errata, and related 
explanatory information. They present information about 
unique characteristics of the report and changes or cor- 
rections made too late to be reflected in the text or tables 
themselves. 

CONTENTS OF THE APPENDIXES 

Appendix A — Provides definitions of the types of geo- 
graphic areas and related information used in census 
reports. 

Appendix B— Contains definitions for the subject-matter 
items used in census reports, including explanations of 
derived measures, limitations of the data, and comparabil- 
ity with previous censuses. The subjects are listed alpha- 
betically. In reports that contain both population and 
housing characteristics, the population characteristics are 
described first, followed by the explanations of the housing 
subjects. 

Appendix C— Provides information on confidentiality of 
the data, allocations and substitutions, and sources of 
errors in the data. 

Appendix D— Explains the residence rules used in count- 
ing the population and housing units, presents a brief 
overview of data collection operations, and describes 
processing procedures used to convert data from unedited 
questionnaires to final 1990 publications and tapes. This 
appendix also clarifies the procedures used to collect data 
for persons abroad at the time of the census, where per- 
sons on military bases or away at school were counted, 
how data were collected for persons in institutions, and 
which citizens of foreign countries were included in the 
U.S. data. 

Appendix E— Presents a facsimile of the 1990 census 
questionnaire pages and the respondent instructions used 
to collect the data in this report. 

Appendix F— Summarizes the 1 990 census data products 
program by describing the information available in printed 
reports and in other sources, such as microfiche or com- 
puter tape; and provides information on where to obtain 
assistance. 

Appendix G— Contains maps depicting the geographic 
areas shown in this report. 



HOW TO USE THIS CENSUS REPORT 



1-3 






TABLE FINDING GUIDE 



Subjects by Race Groups, Hispanic Origin, and White, Not of Hispanic Origin and Table Number 

[Subjects covered in this report are shown on the left side, and race groups, Hispanic origin, and White, not of Hispanic origin are shown at the top. 
Tables 1 through 15 show 100-percent characteristics. Tables 16 through 45 show sample characteristics. For definitions and explanations of subject 
characteristics, see appendix B] 



Subject 



Total 



White 



Black 



American Indian, 
Eskimo, or Aleut 



Asian or 
Pacific Islander 



Hispanic origin 
(of any race) 



White, not of 
Hispanic origin 



POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS 

Age 

Ancestry 

Class of worker 

Disability 

Educational attainment 

Family type by presence of own children 

Fertility 

Hispanic origin 

Household type and relationship 

Income in 1 989 

Industry 

Journey to work 

Labor force status 

Language spoken at home and ability to 

speak English 

Marital status 

Means of transportation to work 

Occupation 

Place of birth 

Place of work 

Poverty status in 1 989 

Race 

Residence in 1 985 

School enrollment and type of school 

Sex 

Urban, rural, and farm residence (persons) . . . 

Work status in 1 989 

Workers in family in 1 989 

HOUSING CHARACTERISTICS 

Bedrooms 

Condominium 

Contract rent 

Gross rent 

House heating fuel 

Household income in 1 989 

Kitchen facilities 

Meals included in rent 

Mortgage status and selected monthly owner 

costs 

Persons in unit 

Persons per room 

Plumbing facilities 

Rooms 

Sewage disposal 

Source of water 

Telephone in unit 

Tenure 

Units in structure 

Vacancy characteristics 

Value 

Vehicles available 

Year householder moved into unit 

Year structure built 

LAND AREA 

... Not applicable for this report. 



1 
16 
18 
18 
17 

1 

17 

8, 16 

1 
19 
18 
17 
18 

17 

1 

17 

18 

17 

17 

19 

8 

17 

17 

1 

17 

18 

18 

32 
32 

9 
33 
32 
32 
32 

9 

33 

9 

9 

32 

9 

32 

32 

32 

9 

9 

9 

9 

32 

32 

32 

1 



20 

20 

2 

20 

2 
21 

20 
20 

20 
2 
20 
21 
20 
20 
21 

20 

20 

2 

20 



34 

10 
35 
34 
34 
34 
10 

35 
10 
10 
34 
10 
34 
34 
34 
10 
10 
10 
10 
34 
34 
34 



22 

22 

3 

22 

3 
23 

22 
22 

22 
3 
22 
23 
22 
22 
23 

22 

22 

3 

22 



36 

11 
37 
36 
36 
36 
11 

37 
11 
11 
36 
11 
36 
36 
36 
11 
11 
11 
11 
36 
36 
36 



24 

24 

4 

24 

4 
25 

24 
24 

24 
4 
24 
25 
24 
24 
25 

24 

24 

4 

24 



38 

12 
39 
38 
38 
38 
12 

39 
12 
12 
38 
12 
38 
38 
38 
12 
12 
12 
12 
38 
38 
38 



26 

26 

5 

26 

5 
27 

26 
26 

26 
5 
26 
27 
26 
26 
27 

26 
26 

5 

26 



40 

13 
41 
40 
40 
40 
13 

41 
13 
13 
40 
13 
40 
40 
40 
13 
13 
13 
13 
40 
40 
40 



28 

28 

6 

28 

6 
29 

28 
28 

28 
6 
28 
29 
28 
28 
29 

28 

28 

6 

28 



42 

14 
43 
42 
42 
42 
14 

43 
14 
14 
42 
14 
42 
42 
42 
14 
14 
14 
14 
42 
42 
42 



30 
30 

7 
30 

7 
31 

30 
30 

30 
7 
30 
31 
30 
30 
31 

30 

30 

7 

30 



44 

15 
45 
44 
44 
44 
15 

45 
15 
15 
44 
15 
44 
44 
44 
15 
15 
15 
15 
44 
44 
44 



TABLE FINDING GUIDE 



11-1 



USER NOTES 



Additional information concerning this 1990 census 
product may be available at a later date. If you wish to 
receive these User Notes, contact: 

Data User Services Division 
Customer Services 
Bureau of the Census 
Washington, DC 20233 
301-763-4100 

Questions concerning the content of this report may be 
directed to: 

Housing and Household Economic Statistics Division 
Bureau of the Census 
Washington, DC 20233 

Population Division 
Bureau of the Census 
Washington, DC 20233 



ADDITIONAL DEFINITIONS AND EXPLANA- 
TIONS OF DATA 



GENERAL 

User Note 1 

Age Reporting— Review of detailed 1990 information 
indicated that respondents tended to provide their age as 
of the date of completion of the questionnaire, not their 
age on April 1, 1990. In addition, there may have been a 
tendency for respondents to round up their age if they were 
close to having a birthday. It is likely that approximately 1 
percent of persons in most age groups are actually 1 year 
younger. For most single years of age, the misstatements 
are largely offsetting. The problem is most pronounced at 
age because persons lost to age 1 may not have been 
fully offset by the inclusion of babies born after April 1 , 
1990, and because there may have been more rounding up 
to age 1 to avoid reporting age as years. (Age in 
completed months was not collected for infants under 
age 1 .) 

The reporting of age 1 year older than age on April 1 , 
1990, is likely to have been greater in areas where the 
census data were collected later in 1 990. The magnitude 
of this problem was much less in the three previous 



censuses where age was typically derived from respond- 
ent data on year of birth and quarter of birth. (For more 
information on the design of the age question, see the 
discussion on comparability under "Age" in appendix B.) 

User Note 2 

The user should note that there are limitations to many 
of these data. Please refer to the text provided with this 
report for further explanations on the limitations of the 
data. 

User Note 3 

This report series (CPH-3) includes 100-percent and 
sample data for population and housing characteristics. 
Tables 1 through 8 present data on general population 
characteristics based on tabulations of 100-percent data 
and tables 9 through 15 show 100-percent housing data. 
Tables 16 through 31 show sample data on social and 
economic characteristics and tables 32 through 45 show 
sample housing data. 

User Note 4 

Persons or householders of Hispanic origin may be of 
any race. References indicating this information were 
inadvertently omitted from some tables in this report 
series. 

User Note 5 

Electrostatic-plotter copies of Census Tract/Block Num- 
bering Area (BNA) Outline Maps are no longer sold by the 
Census Bureau's Customer Services. Printed copies of 
maps are obtainable through the Superintendent of Docu- 
ments. The availability of selected products and informa- 
tion on certain services described in appendix F of this 
report series has changed. For current information about 
various report series; additional 1990 census data prod- 
ucts such as computer tapes, microfiche, and laser disks; 
reference materials; and sources of assistance, see appen- 
dix F in the 1 990 CP-2 or CH-2 report series. 

User Note 6 

The data shown in selected products for persons enu- 
merated in "visible in street locations" are incorrect and 
should not be used. Only the 100-percent data shown in 



USER NOTES 



111— -I 



data products, such as Summary Tape Files (STF's) 1 and 
2 and in the 1 990 CP-1 , General Population Characteristics 
State reports should be used for persons enumerated at 
"visible in street locations." 

During "Shelter and Street Night Enumeration," all 
visible persons on the streets were asked only the basic 
1 00-percent population questions (age, sex, marital status, 
race, and Hispanic origin). 

During census processing of sample data, information 
from the long-form questionnaire was inadvertently assigned 
to a very small percentage of the visible in street popula- 
tion. 

User Note 7 

The estimated population totals for persons in group 
quarters, specifically by group quarters type, that are 
based on census sample tabulations may differ from 
comparable figures shown in 1 00-percent tabulations. Such 
differences result, in part, from sampling variability which 
occurs because information was obtained from a sample 
of the population rather than from all persons. Differences 
also occur because of nonsampling errors which affect the 
100-percent and sample data. Examples of nonsampling 
errors include respondent and enumerator errors, process- 
ing errors, and nonresponse. 

The 1 00-percent data are the official counts and should 
be used as the source for data on group quarters type 
when the primary focus is on counts of the population in 
group quarters, especially for small areas such as census 
tracts/BNA's or blocks. When the group quarters popula- 
tion is shown by characteristics covered only on a sample 
basis (for example, education, labor force status, income, 
etc.), the sample figures should be used within the context 
of the sampling variability associated with them. 

For more information on the limitations of 100-percent 
and sample data for persons in group quarters and the 
classification of group quarters type, see appendix B. 
Reasons for the differences between 100-percent and 
sample totals will be an important focus of post-census 
research and evaluation. 

User Note 8 

Estimated population and housing unit totals based on 
tabulations from only the sample questionnaires (sample 
tabulations) may differ from the official counts as tabulated 
from every census questionnaire (1 00-percent tabulations). 
Such differences result, in part, because the sample 
tabulations are based on information from a sample of 
households rather than from all households (sampling 
error). Differences also can occur because the interview 
situation (length of questionnaire, effect of the interviewer, 
etc.) and the processing rules differ between the 100- 
percent and sample tabulations. These types of differ- 
ences are referred to as nonsampling errors. (For more 
information on nonsampling error, see appendix C.) 



The 1 00-percent data are the official counts and should 
be used as the source of information on population and 
housing items collected on the 100-percent questionnaire, 
such as age, race, Hispanic origin, number of rooms, and 
tenure. This is especially appropriate when the primary 
focus is on counts of the population or housing units for 
small areas such as census tracts/BNA's, block groups, 
and for American Indian and Alaska Native areas. For 
estimates of counts of persons and housing units by 
characteristics asked only on a sample basis (such as 
education, labor force status, income, and source of 
water), the sample estimates should be used within the 
context of the error associated with them. 

Many users are interested in tabulations of items col- 
lected on the sample cross-classified by items collected on 
a 100-percent basis such as age, race, sex, Hispanic 
origin, and housing units by tenure. Given the way the 
weights were applied during sample tabulations, generally, 
there is exact agreement between sample estimates and 
1 00-percent counts for total population and total housing 
units for most geographic areas. At the State level and 
higher geographic levels, sample estimates and 1 00-percent 
counts for population by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin 
and for housing units by tenure, number of rooms and so 
on would be reasonably similar and, in some cases, the 
same. 

At smaller geographic levels, including census tract/ 
BNA, there is still general agreement between 100-percent 
counts and sample estimates of total population or hous- 
ing units. At smaller geographic levels, however, there will 
be expected differences between sample estimates and 
100-percent counts for population by age, sex, race, and 
Hispanic origin and for housing units by tenure, number of 
rooms and so on. In these cases, users may want to 
consider using derived measures (such as means and 
medians) or percent distributions. Whether using absolute 
numbers or derived measures for small population groups 
and for a small number of housing units in small geo- 
graphic areas, users should be cautioned that the sampling 
error associated with these data may be large. 

Even though the differences between sample estimates 
and 1 00-percent counts for these categories are generally 
small, the differences for the American Indian, as well as 
the Hispanic origin populations, are relatively larger than 
for other groups. The following provides some explanation 
for these differences. 

State-level sample estimates of the number of Ameri- 
can Indians are generally higher than the corresponding 
1 00-percent counts. It appears the differences are prima- 
rily the result of proportionately higher reporting of "Cher- 
okee" tribe on sample questionnaires. This phenomenon 
occurs primarily in off-reservation areas. The reasons for 
the greater reporting of Cherokee on sample forms are not 
fully known at this time. The Census Bureau will do 
research to provide more information on this phenomenon. 

For the Hispanic origin population, sample estimates at 
the State level are generally lower than the corresponding 
1 00-percent counts. The majority of difference is caused 



III— 2 



USER NOTES 



by the 100-percent and sample processing of the Hispanic 
question on the sample questionnaire when the respond- 
ent did not mark any response category. When processing 
the sample, we used written entries in race or Hispanic 
origin as well as responses to questions only asked on the 
sample, such as ancestry and place of birth. These proce- 
dures led to a lower proportion of persons being assigned 
as Hispanic in sample processing than were assigned 
during 100-percent processing. The Census Bureau will 
evaluate the effectiveness of the 1 00-percent and sample 
procedures. 

As in previous censuses, the Census Bureau will eval- 
uate the quality of the data and make this information 
available to data users. In the meanwhile, both 100- 
percent and sample data serve very important purposes 
and, therefore, should be used within the limitations of the 
sampling and nonsampling errors. 



White population and for the White, not of Hispanic origin 
population. Specifically, complementary thresholds are 
used to limit the presentation of characteristics for the 
White population when the population of races other than 
White is small and for the White, not of Hispanic origin 
population when the Hispanic origin population is small. 
For example, assume that the threshold and comple- 
mentary threshold are 400 in a table showing data by race 
and Hispanic origin for counties. The threshold of 400 
applies to each group, and in addition, the complementary 
threshold of 400 applies to White and to White, not of 
Hispanic origin. The following figure shows how the thresh- 
old and complementary threshold for race and Hispanic 
origin apply for a hypothetical county. (For simplicity, it is 
assumed that the "Other race" population of the county is 
zero because characteristics are not shown for the "Other 
race" population below the State level. 



User Note 9 

Thresholds and Complementary Thresholds— To show 
characteristics for a large number of racial and Hispanic 
groups and to avoid using a large number of pages to show 
characteristics for small population groups, population 
thresholds are used in some tables in selected reports. 
Also, complementary population thresholds are used in 
some tables to avoid showing largely repetitive data for the 



User Note 10 

Thresholds in CPH-3— For this report series, the thres- 
hold and complementary threshold of 400 persons used to 
present characteristics for racial and Hispanic origin groups 
are applied separately for 100-percent and sample data. 
Therefore, the geographic coverage may differ between 
tables showing 100-percent data and tables showing sam- 
ple data. 



Figure. Example of Threshold and Complementary Threshold 



Race and Hispanic origin 



Characteristics 
Population shown Reason 



All persons 
White 



14,700 
13,800 



Yes 
Yes 



Threshold does not apply to total population. 



Threshold and complementary threshold apply. 
There are 400 or more White persons, and there 
are 400 or more persons of races other than White. 



Black 



500 



Yes 



Threshold applies. There are 400 or more Black 
persons. 



American Indian, Eskimo, or 
Aleut 



100 



No 



Threshold applies. There are fewer than 400 
American Indian, Eskimo, or Aleut persons. 



Asian or Pacific Islander 



300 



No 



Threshold applies. There are fewer than 400 Asian 
or Pacific Islander persons. 



Hispanic origin (or any race) 



300 



No 



Threshold applies. There are fewer than 400 
Hispanic persons. 



White, not of Hispanic origin 13,500 



No 



Threshold and complementary threshold apply. 
There are 400 or more White, not of Hispanic origin 
persons, but there are fewer than 400 Hispanic 
origin persons. 



USER NOTES 



1 1 1-3 



LIST OF CENSUS TRACT REPORTS 



Report No 


i 


1 


United States 


2 


Alabama 


3 


Alaska 


4 


Arizona 


5 


Arkansas 


6 


California 


7 


Colorado 


8 


Connecticut 


9 


Delaware 


10 


Not Assigned 


11 


Florida 


12 


Georgia 


13 


Hawaii 


14 


Idaho 


15 


Illinois 


16 


Indiana 


17 


Iowa 


18 


Kansas 


19 


Kentucky 


20 


Louisiana 


21 


Maine 


22 


Maryland 


23 


Massachusetts 


24 


Michigan 


25 


Minnesota 


26 


Mississippi 


27 


Missouri 


28 


Montana 


29 


Nebraska 


30 


Nevada 


31 


New Hampshire 


32 


Not Assigned 


33 


New Mexico 


34 


New York 


35 


North Carolina 


36 


North Dakota 


37 


Ohio 


38 


Oklahoma 


39 


Oregon 


40 


Pennsylvania 


41 


Rhode Island 


42 


South Carolina 


43 


South Dakota 


44 


Tennessee 


45 


Texas 


46 


Utah 


47 


Vermont 


48 


Virginia 


49 


Washington 


50 


West Virginia 


51 


Wisconsin 


52 


Wyoming 


53 


Puerto Rico 


54 


Not Assigned 


55 


Virgin Islands 



Area 



Report No. 



Area 



56 


Not Assigned 


57 


Not Assigned 


58 


Abilene, TX MSA 


59 


Aguadilla, PR MSA 


60 


Albany, GA MSA 


61 


Albany-Schenectady-Troy, NY 




MSA 


62 


Albuquerque, NM MSA 


63 


Alexandria, LA MSA 


64 


Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, 




PA-NJ MSA 


65 


Altoona, PA MSA 


66 


Amarillo, TX MSA 


67 


Anchorage, AK MSA 


68 


Anderson, IN MSA 


69 


Anderson, SC MSA 


70 


Anniston, AL MSA 


71 


Appleton-Oshkosh-Neenah, Wl 




MSA 


72 


Arecibo, PR MSA 


73 


Asheville, NC MSA 


74 


Athens, GA MSA 


75 


Atlanta, GA MSA 


76 


Atlantic City, NJ MSA 


77 


Augusta, GA-SC MSA 


78 


Austin, TX MSA 


79 


Bakersfield, CA MSA 


80 


Baltimore, MD MSA 


81 


Bangor, ME MSA 


82 


Baton Rouge, LA MSA 


83 


Battle Creek, Ml MSA 


84 


Beaumont-Port Arthur, TX MSA 


85 


Bellingham, WA MSA 


86 


Benton Harbor, Ml. MSA 


87 


Billings, MT MSA 


88 


Biloxi-Gulfport, MS MSA 


89 


Binghamton, NY MSA 


90 


Birmingham, AL MSA 


91 


Bismarck, ND MSA 


92 


Bloomington, IN MSA 


93 


Bloomington-Normal, IL MSA 


94 


Boise City, ID MSA 




Boston-Lawrence-Salem, 




MA-NH CMSA: 


95A 


Boston, MA PMSA 


95B 


Brockton, MA PMSA 


95C 


Lawrence-Haverhill, MA-NH 




PMSA 


95D 


Lowell, MA-NH PMSA 


95E 


Nashua, NH PMSA 


95F 


Salem-Gloucester, MA PMSA 


96 


Bradenton, FL MSA 


97 


Bremerton, WA MSA 


98 


Brownsville-Harlingen, TX MSA 


99 


Bryan-College Station, TX MSA 



Report No. Area 

Buffalo-Niagara Falls, NY CMSA: 



100A 


Buffalo, NY PMSA 




100B 


Niagara Falls, NY PMSA 




101 


Burlington, NC MSA 




102 


Burlington, VT MSA 




103 


Canton, OH MSA 




104 


Casper, WY MSA 




105 


Cedar Rapids, IA MSA 




106 


Champaign-Urbana-Rantoul, IL 
MSA 




107 


Charleston, SC MSA 




108 


Charleston, WV MSA 




109 


Charlotte-Gastonia-Rock Hill, 
NC-SC MSA 




110 


Charlottesville, VA MSA 




111 


Chattanooga, TN-GA MSA 




112 


Cheyenne, WY MSA 






Chicago-Gary-Lake County, 


"j 




IL-IN-WI CMSA: 




113A 


Aurora-Elgin, IL PMSA 




113B 


Chicago, IL PMSA 




113C 


Gary-Hammond, IN PMSA 


f, 
v 


113D 


Joliet, IL PMSA 


~ 


113E 


Kenosha, Wl PMSA 


>tk 


113F 


Lake County, IL PMSA 


Ifj 


114 


Chico, CA MSA 


iJ 




Cincinnati-Hamilton, OH-KY-IN 


z 




CMSA: 




115A 


Cincinnati, OH-KY-IN PMSA 




115B 


Hamilton-Middletown, OH 


"I 




PMSA 





1 1 6 Clarksville-Hopkinsville, TN-KY 

MSA 

Cleveland-Akron-Lorain, OH 
CMSA: 

117A Akron, OH PMSA 

117B Cleveland, OH PMSA 

117C Lorain-Elyria, OH PMSA 

118 Colorado Springs, CO MSA 

119 Columbia, MO MSA 

120 Columbia, SC MSA 

121 Columbus, GA-AL MSA 

122 Columbus, OH MSA 

123 Corpus Christi, TX MSA 

124 Cumberland, MD-WV MSA 

Dallas-Fort Worth, TX CMSA: 

125A Dallas, TX PMSA 

125B Fort Worth-Arlington, TX PMSA 

126 Danville, VA MSA 

127 Davenport-Rock Island- 

Moline, IA-IL MSA 

128 Dayton-Springfield, OH MSA 

129 Daytona Beach, FL MSA 

130 Decatur, AL MSA 

131 Decatur, I L MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



IV-1 



Report No. 



Area 



Report No. 



Area 



Report No. 



Area 



132A 
132B 

133 



134A 
134B 

135 
136 
137 
138 
139 

140 
141 
142 
143 
144 

145 
146 
147 
148 
149 

150 
151 
152 
153 
154 

155 
156 
157 
158 
159 

160 
161 
162 
163 
164 

165 
166 
167 
168 

169 

170 
171 



172A 
172B 
172C 
172D 

173 
174 

175 



176A 
176B 
176C 

177 
178 



Denver-Boulder, CO CMSA: 

Boulder-Longmont, CO PMSA 
Denver, CO PMSA 

Des Moines, IA MSA 

Detroit-Ann Arbor, Ml CMSA: 

Ann Arbor, Ml PMSA 
Detroit, Ml PMSA 

Dothan, AL MSA 
Dubuque, IA MSA 
Duluth, MN-WI MSA 
Eau Claire, Wl MSA 
El Paso, TX MSA 

Elkhart-Goshen, IN MSA 
Elmira, NY MSA 
Enid, OK MSA 
Erie, PA MSA 
Eugene-Springfield, OR MSA 

Evansville, IN-KY MSA 
Fargo-Moorhead, ND-MN MSA 
Fayetteville, NC MSA 
Fayetteville-Springdale, AR MSA 
Fitchburg-Leominster, MA MSA 

Flint, Ml MSA 

Florence, AL MSA 

Florence, SC MSA 

Fort Collins-Loveland, CO MSA 

Fort Myers-Cape Coral, FL MSA 

Fort Pierce, FL MSA 
Fort Smith, AR-OK MSA 
Fort Walton Beach, FL MSA 
Fort Wayne, IN MSA 
Fresno, CA MSA 

Gadsden, AL MSA 
Gainesville, FL MSA 
Glens Falls, NY MSA 
Grand Forks, ND MSA 
Grand Rapids, Ml MSA 

Great Falls, MT MSA 
Greeley, CO MSA 
Green Bay, Wl MSA 
Greensboro-Winston-Salem- 

High Point, NC MSA 
Greenville-Spartanburg, SC MSA 

Hagerstown, MD MSA 

Harrisburg-Lebanon-Carlisle, PA 
MSA 

Hartford-New Britain- 
Middletown, CT CMSA: 

Bristol, CT PMSA 
Hartford, CT PMSA 
Middletown, CT PMSA 
New Britain, CT PMSA 

Hickory-Morganton, NC MSA 
Honolulu, HI MSA 
Houma-Thibodaux, LA MSA 

Houston-Galveston-Brazoria, 
TX CMSA: 

Brazoria, TX PMSA 
Galveston-Texas City, TX PMSA 
Houston, TX PMSA 

Huntington-Ashland, WV-KY-OH 

MSA 
Huntsville, AL MSA 



179 Indianapolis, IN MSA 

180 Iowa City, IA MSA 

181 Jackson, Ml MSA 

182 Jackson, MS MSA 

183 Jackson, TN MSA 

184 Jacksonville, FL MSA 

185 Jacksonville, NC MSA 

186 Jamestown-Dunkirk, NY MSA 

187 Janesville-Beloit, Wl MSA 

188 Johnson City-Kingsport- 

Bristol, TN-VA MSA 

189 Johnstown, PA MSA 

190 Joplin, MOMSA 

191 Kalamazoo, Ml MSA 

192 Kankakee, I L MSA 

193 Kansas City, MO-KS MSA 

194 Killeen-Temple, TX MSA 

195 Knoxville, TN MSA 

196 Kokomo, IN MSA 

197 La Crosse, Wl MSA 

198 Lafayette, LA MSA 

199 Lafayette-West Lafayette, IN MSA 

200 Lake Charles, LA MSA 

201 Lakeland-Winter Haven, FL MSA 

202 Lancaster, PA MSA 

203 Lansing-East Lansing, Ml MSA 

204 Laredo, TX MSA 

205 Las Cruces, NM MSA 

206 Las Vegas, NV MSA 

207 Lawrence, KS MSA 

208 Lawton, OK MSA 

209 Lewiston-Auburn, ME MSA 

210 Lexington-Fayette, KY MSA 

21 1 Lima, OH MSA 

212 Lincoln, NE MSA 

213 Little Rock-North Little Rock, AR 

MSA 

214 Longview-Marshall, TX MSA 

Los Angeles-Anaheim- 
Riverside, CA CMSA: 

21 5A Anaheim-Santa Ana, CA PMSA 

21 5B Los Angeles-Long Beach, CA 

PMSA 
215C Oxnard- Ventura, CA PMSA 

21 5D Riverside-San Bernardino, CA 

PMSA 

216 Louisville, KY-IN MSA 

217 Lubbock, TX MSA 

218 Lynchburg, VA MSA 

219 Macon-Warner Robins, G A MSA 

220 Madison, Wl MSA 

221 Manchester, NH MSA 

222 Mansfield, OH MSA 

223 Mayagiiez, PR MSA 

224 McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, TX 

MSA 

225 Medford, OR MSA 

226 Melbourne-Titusville-Palm Bay, FL 

MSA 

227 Memphis, TN-AR-MS MSA 

228 Merced, CA MSA 

Miami-Fort Lauderdale, FL 
CMSA: 

229A Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood- 

Pompano Beach, FL PMSA 
229B Miami-Hialeah, FL PMSA 



230 Midland, TX MSA 

Milwaukee-Racine, Wl CMSA: 

231 A Milwaukee, Wl PMSA 

231 B Racine, Wl PMSA 

232 Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN-WI MSA 

233 Mobile, AL MSA 

234 Modesto, CA MSA 

235 Monroe, LA MSA 

236 Montgomery, AL MSA 

237 Muncie, IN MSA 

238 Muskegon, Ml MSA 

239 Naples, FL MSA 

240 Nashville, TN MSA 

241 New Bedford, MA MSA 

242 New Haven-Meriden, CT MSA 

243 New London-Norwich, CT-RI MSA 

244 New Orleans, LA MSA 

New York-Northern New 
Jersey-Long Island, 
NY-NJ-CT CMSA: 

245A Bergen-Passaic, NJ PMSA 

245B Bridgeport-Milford, CT PMSA 

245C Danbury, CT PMSA 

245D Jersey City, NJ PMSA 

245E Middlesex-Somerset- 

Hunterdon, NJ PMSA 
245F Monmouth-Ocean, NJ PMSA 

245G Nassau-Suffolk, NY PMSA 

245H New York, NY PMSA 

245I Newark, NJ PMSA 

245J Norwalk, CT PMSA 

245K Orange County, NY PMSA 

245L Stamford, CT PMSA 

246 Norfolk-Virginia Beach- 

Newport News, VA MSA 

247 Ocala, FL MSA 

248 Odessa, TX MSA 

249 Oklahoma City, OK MSA 

250 Olympia, WA MSA 

251 Omaha, NE-IA MSA 

252 Orlando, FL MSA 

253 Owensboro, KY MSA 

254 Panama City, FL MSA 

255 Parkersburg-Marietta, WV-OH 

MSA 

256 Pascagoula, MS MSA 

257 Pensacola, FL MSA 

258 Peoria, IL MSA 

Philadelphia- Wilmington- 
Trenton, PA-NJ-DE-MD CMSA: 

259A Philadelphia, PA-NJ PMSA 

259B Trenton, NJ PMSA 

259C Vineland-Millville-Bridgeton, NJ 

PMSA 
259D Wilmington, DE-NJ-MD PMSA 

260 Phoenix, AZ MSA 

261 Pine Bluff, AR MSA 

Pittsburgh-Beaver Valley, PA 
CMSA: 

262A Beaver County, PA PMSA 

262B Pittsburgh, PA PMSA 

263 Pittsfield, MA MSA 

264 Ponce, PR MSA 

265 Portland, ME MSA 



IV-2 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 






Report No. 



Area 



Report No. 



Area 



Report No. 



Area 



Portland-Vancouver, OR-WA 
CMSA: 

266A Portland, OR PMSA 

266B Vancouver, WA PMSA 

267 Portsmouth-Dover-Rochester, 

NH-ME MSA 

268 Poughkeepsie, NY MSA 

Providence-Pawtucket-Fall 
River, RI-MA CMSA: 

269A Fall River, MA-RI PMSA 

269B Pawtucket-Woonsocket- 

Attleboro, RI-MA PMSA 
269C Providence, Rl PMSA 

270 Provo-Orem, UT MSA 

271 Pueblo, CO MSA 

272 Raleigh-Durham, NC MSA 

273 Rapid City, SD MSA 

274 Reading, PA MSA 

275 Redding, CA MSA 

276 Reno, NV MSA 

277 Richland-Kennewick-Pasco, WA 

MSA 

278 Richmond-Petersburg, VA MSA 

279 Roanoke, VA MSA 

280 Rochester, MN MSA 

281 Rochester, NY MSA 

282 Rockford, IL MSA 

283 Sacramento, CA MSA 

284 Saginaw-Bay City-Midland, Ml 

MSA 

285 St. Cloud, MN MSA 

286 St. Joseph, MO MSA 

287 St. Louis, MO-IL MSA 

288 Salem, OR MSA 

289 Salinas-Seaside-Monterey, CA 

MSA 

290 Salt Lake City-Ogden, UT MSA 

291 San Angelo, TX MSA 



292 San Antonio, TX MSA 

293 San Diego, CA MSA 

San Francisco-Oakland-San 
Jose, CA CMSA: 

294A Oakland, CA PMSA 

294B San Francisco, CA PMSA 

294C San Jose, CA PMSA 

294D Santa Cruz, CA PMSA 

294E Santa Rosa-Petaluma, CA 

PMSA 
294F Vallejo-Fairfield-Napa, CA 

PMSA 

San Juan-Caguas, PR CMSA: 

295A Caguas, PR PMSA 

295B San Juan, PR PMSA 

296 Santa Barbara-Santa Maria- 

Lompoc, CA MSA 

297 Santa Fe, NM MSA 

298 Sarasota, FL MSA 

299 Savannah, GA MSA 

300 Scranton-Wilkes-Barre, PA MSA 

Seattle-Tacoma, WA CMSA: 

301 A Seattle, WA PMSA 

301 B Tacoma, WA PMSA 

302 Sharon, PA MSA 

303 Sheboygan, Wl MSA 

304 Sherman-Denison, TX MSA 

305 Shreveport, LA MSA 

306 Sioux City, IA-NE MSA 

307 Sioux Falls, SD MSA 

308 South Bend-Mishawaka, IN MSA 

309 Spokane, WA MSA 

310 Springfield, IL MSA 

311 Springfield, MO MSA 

312 Springfield, MA MSA 

313 State College, PA MSA 

314 Steubenville-Weirton, OH-WV 

MSA 



315 Stockton, CA MSA 

316 Syracuse, NY MSA 

317 Tallahassee, FL MSA 

318 Tampa-St. Petersburg- 

Clearwater, FL MSA 

319 Terre Haute, IN MSA 

320 Texarkana, TX-Texarkana, AR 

MSA 

321 Toledo, OH MSA 



322 


Topeka, KS MSA 




323 


Tucson, AZ MSA 




324 


Tulsa, OK MSA 




325 


Tuscaloosa, AL MSA 




326 


Tyler, TX MSA 




327 


Utica-Rome, NY MSA 




328 


Victoria, TX MSA 




329 


Visalia-Tulare-Porterville, CA 
MSA 




330 


Waco, TX MSA 




331 


Washington, DC-MD-VA MSA 




332 


Waterbury, CT MSA 




333 


Waterloo-Cedar Falls, IA MSA 




334 


Wausau, Wl MSA 




335 


West Palm Beach-Boca Raton- 






Delray Beach, FL MSA 




336 


Wheeling, WV-OH MSA 


* 


337 


Wichita, KS MSA 




338 


Wichita Falls, TX MSA 




339 


Williamsport, PA MSA 




340 


Wilmington, NC MSA 


3 


341 


Worcester, MA MSA 


•- 


342 


Yakima, WA MSA 


-■ 


343 


York, PA MSA 


- 


344 


Youngstown-Warren, OH 






MSA 


3 


345 


Yuba City, CA MSA 




346 


Yuma, AZ MSA 


a 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



IV-3 



Table A. Census Tract Comparability: 1990 to 1980 

[Tables list selected census tracts tor which boundaries or identification changed between 1980 and 1990. See text "How to Use This Census Report" for further explanation] 



1990 tract 



1980 tract 



FLORENCE COUNTY, SC 



2.01 
2.02 
3 — 



15.01 . 

15.02 . 
16.01 . 
16.02 
22.01 . 

22.02 

24.98 



2 (pt.) 

2 (pt.) 

3 (pt.) 
3 (pt.) 
8 

15 (pt 

15 (pt 

16 (pt 
16 (pt 

21 (pt 

22 (pt 

21 (pt 

22 (pt 
24 



IV-4 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table B. Census Tract Comparability: 1980 to 1990 

[Tables list selected census tracts tor which boundaries or identification changed between 1980 and 1990. See text "How to Use This Census Report" for further explanation] 
1980 tract 1990 tract 



FLORENCE COUNTY, SC 

2 2.01 

2.02 
3 3 

8 (pt.) 

8 8 (pt.) 

15 15.01 

15.02 
16 -- 16.01 

16.02 
21 22.01 (pt.) 

22.02 (pt.) 
22 22.01 (pt.) 

22.02 (pt.) 
24 24.98 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS FLORENCE, SC MSA IV-5 



Table l. General Characteristics of Persons: 1990 



[For definitions of terms ond meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Florence, SC 
MSA 



Florence County 



Total Florence city 



Totals for split tracts/BNA's in Florence County 



Tract 2.01 



Tract 2.02 



Tract 3 



Tract 5 



Tract 6 



Tract 7 



Troct 8 






LAND AREA 

Square kilometers 

Square miles 

AGE 

All persons 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 years and over 

3 and 4 years 

16 years and over 

18 years and over 

21 years and over 

60 years and over 

62 years and over 

Median 

Female 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 years and over 

3 and 4 years 

16 years and over 

18 years and over 

21 years and over 

60 years and over 

62 years and over 

Median . 

Male 

Median age 

HOUSEHOLD TYPE AND RELATIONSHIP 

All persons 

In households 

Householder 

Family householder 

Nonfamily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Child 

Other relatives 

Nonrelatives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 

Persons per household 

Persons per family 

Persons 65 years and over 

In households 

Householder 

Nonfamily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Other relatives 

Nonrelatives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 

FAMILY TYPE BY PRESENCE OF OWN CHILDREN 

Families 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

Married-couple families 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

MARITAL STATUS 

Males 15 years and over 

Never married 

Now married, except separated 

Separated 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Females 15 years and over 

Never married 

Now married, except separated 

Separated 

Widowed 

Divorced 



2 070.0 
799.2 



114 344 

8 364 

8 857 

9 561 
9 539 

8 263 
17 827 
17 765 
11 964 

9 481 
7 973 
3 814 

936 

3 423 
85 628 
81 888 
76 230 
17 311 
15 520 

32.2 

60 444 

4 132 



342 

705 

792 

338 

479 

270 

306 

5 117 

4 702 

2 532 

729 

1 668 

46 340 

44 482 

41 521 

10 481 

9 501 

33.4 

53 900 

30.7 



114 344 

111 645 

40 217 

30 175 

10 042 
8 773 

21 839 

38 724 

7 978 
2 887 
1 662 
1 037 

2.78 

3.27 

12 723 

11 896 

8 258 



30 175 

15 026 
27 622 
21 839 
10 647 
19 454 

6 947 
3 815 

7 217 



40 297 

12 332 

22 992 

1 443 

1 158 

2 372 

47 265 

11 839 
22 952 

2 380 
6 677 

3 417 



2 070.0 
799.2 



114 344 

8 364 

8 857 

9 561 
9 539 

8 263 
17 827 
17 765 
11 964 

9 481 
7 973 
3 814 

936 

3 423 
85 628 
81 888 
76 230 
17 311 
15 520 

32.2 

60 444 

4 132 



342 
705 
792 
338 
479 
270 
306 
117 
702 
532 
729 

1 668 

46 340 

44 482 

41 521 

10 481 

9 501 

33.4 

53 900 

30.7 



114 344 

111 645 

40 217 

30 175 

10 042 
8 773 

21 839 

38 724 

7 978 
2 887 
1 662 
1 037 

2.78 

3.27 

12 723 

11 896 

8 258 



620 
495 
508 
969 
161 
816 
11 



30 175 

15 026 
27 622 
21 839 

10 647 
19 454 

6 947 
3 815 

7 217 



40 297 

12 332 

22 992 

1 443 

1 158 

2 372 

47 265 

11 839 
22 952 

2 380 
6 677 

3 417 



38.2 
14.7 



29 813 

2 164 



090 
284 
202 
126 
851 

449 
867 
523 
587 
295 
375 

841 

22 803 

21 941 

20 661 

5 598 

5 083 

33.4 

16 283 

1 062 
1 067 
1 142 
1 094 

1 115 

2 624 

2 387 
1 588 
1 473 
1 550 

877 
304 

407 
12 775 

12 351 
11 702 

3 530 
3 218 

35.1 

13 530 
31.3 



29 813 

28 492 
11 074 



' 527 

1 547 

I 064 

I 902 

> 267 

! 294 

955 

963 

358 

2.57 

3.19 

t 257 

! 958 

! 820 

352 

303 

821 

252 

65 

294 

5 



7 527 

3 495 
6 428 

4 902 

2 106 

3 841 
2 296 

1 283 

2 411 



10 263 



3 


643 


5 


213 




434 




366 




607 


3 


012 


3 


715 


5 


164 




817 


2 


182 


1 


134 



15.1 
5.8 



2 155 

150 
167 
199 
163 
155 
311 
379 
286 
197 
105 
38 
5 

65 

1 606 

1 547 

1 443 

239 

193 

32.9 

1 100 

76 
93 
99 
75 
80 
158 
194 
149 
92 
56 
25 
3 

24 
818 
790 
739 
128 
104 
33.1 
1 055 
32.5 



2 155 

2 152 
773 
607 
166 
140 
503 
756 
69 
51 



2.78 

3.19 

148 

148 

91 

27 

27 

41 

16 



607 

327 

575 

503 

260 

462 

79 

53 

90 



807 

208 

520 

19 

10 

50 

832 

172 
518 
27 
50 
65 



9.0 
3.5 



3 361 

190 
194 
225 
239 
285 
626 
582 
427 
324 
211 
55 
3 



73 

2 702 

2 596 

2 462 

425 

366 

33.6 

1 776 

96 

91 

107 

127 

166 

325 

305 

223 

179 

120 

34 

3 

34 

1 456 

1 395 

1 322 

242 

210 

34.2 

1 585 

33.0 



3 361 

3 361 
1 362 
968 
394 
306 
809 
980 
98 
112 



2.47 
2.95 
269 

269 
187 

67 
66 
65 
16 

1 



968 

444 
719 
809 
356 
587 
142 
83 
123 



1 270 

308 

830 

35 

13 

84 

1 482 

332 
836 
32 
127 
155 



34.1 
13.2 



3 738 

249 
286 
324 
372 
220 
444 
695 
436 
403 
243 
59 
7 

121 

2 799 

2 644 

2 458 

475 

407 

34.4 

1 995 

129 

132 
167 
196 
121 
252 
371 
241 
214 
134 
33 
5 

60 

1 526 

1 443 

1 343 

260 

219 

35.0 

1 743 

33.6 



3 738 

3 738 

1 251 

1 047 

204 

174 

771 

1 398 

240 

78 



2.99 

3.30 

309 

309 

199 

62 

57 

77 

25 



1 047 

528 
940 
771 
380 
693 
235 
132 
221 



1 312 

379 

815 

30 

20 

68 

1 567 

438 

805 

68 

137 

119 



73.3 
28 3 



4 237 

291 
292 
278 
602 
629 
627 
568 
417 
266 
199 
58 
10 

122 

3 322 

3 207 

2 538 

391 

343 

25.4 

2 263 

162 

143 
146 
331 
354 
334 
289 
203 
138 
118 
36 
9 



56 

1 790 

1 730 

1 335 

232 

207 

24.9 

1 974 

26.1 



4 237 

3 591 
1 338 
981 
357 
294 
686 
1 216 
218 
133 

646 

2.68 
3.16 
267 

267 

181 
76 
74 
46 
34 
6 



981 

520 
907 
686 
347 
605 
225 
137 
242 



1 564 

632 

719 
47 
30 

136 

1 812 

691 
734 
73 
174 
140 



9.6 
3.7 



3 350 

216 
232 
246 
260 
191 
552 
605 
408 
333 
233 
65 
9. 



73 

2 605 

2 510 

2 354 

465 

398 

34.7 

1 715 

111 
122 
113 
118 

98 
282 
305 
215 
170 
135 

41 
5 

44 

1 347 

1 308 

1 228 

262 

230 

35.4 

1 635 

33.6 



3 350 

3 350 

1 220 

1 008 

212 

192 

858 

1 096 

119 

57 



2.75 
3.06 
307 

307 
203 
71 
69 
77 
23 
4 



1 008 

462 
775 
858 
391 
666 
115 
56 
87 



1 287 

295 

885 
21 
12 
74 

1 369 

233 
882 

19 
136 

99 



5.8 
2.2 



4 775 

422 
315 
405 
467 
390 
789 
649 
457 
327 
328 
171 
55 

151 

3 529 

3 352 

3 096 

719 

663 

30.2 

2 628 

195 
170 
205 
220 
227 
423 
362 
264 
191 
208 
120 
43 

62 
2 010 
1 929 

1 793 
472 
438 

32.0 

2 147 
27.9 



4 775 

4 078 
1 415 
975 
440 
392 
384 
1 544 
582 
153 
419 
278 

2.88 
3.57 
554 

543 

415 

214 

206 

64 

51 

13 



975 

487 
986 
384 
168 
340 
513 
295 
602 



1 575 

888 

420 

95 

83 

89 

2 058 

926 
439 
201 
369 
123 



6.6 
2.5 



5 678 

492 
456 
587 
630 
436 
702 
800 
582 
427 
361 
170 
35 

177 

4 005 

3 748 

3 407 

765 

679 

28.4 

3 168 

249 
232 
270 
332 
225 
423 
469 
351 
264 
212 
115 
26 



2 343 

2 217 

2 030 

482 

427 

31.6 

2 510 

24.0 



5 678 

5 678 
1 746 

1 377 
369 
331 
632 

2 319 
835 
146 



3.25 
3.75 
566 

566 

398 

151 

143 

84 

68 

16 



1 377 

704 
1 386 
632 
302 
591 
663 
379 
754 



1 726 

757 

688 

156 

68 

57 

2 417 

906 
689 
258 
409 
155 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 1 



Table l. General Characteristics of Persons: 1990— Con. 



[For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



"ensus Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Totals for split tracts/BNA's in Florence County— Con. 



Tract 9 



Tract 10 



Tract 1 1 



Tract 12 



Tract 13 



Tract 14 



Tract 15.01 



Tract 16.01 



Florence city, Florence County 



Tract 2.01 

(pt.) Tract 2.02 (pt.) 



LAND AREA 

Square kilometers 

Square miles 

AGE 

All persons 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 years and over 

3 and 4 years 

16 years and over 

18 years and over 

21 years and over 

60 years and over 

62 years and over 

Median 

Female 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 years and over 

3 and 4 years 

16 years and over 

18 years and over 

21 years and over 

60 years and over 

62 years and over 

Median 

Male 

Median age 

HOUSEHOLD TYPE AND RELATIONSHIP 

All persons 

In households 

Householder 

Family householder 

Nonfamily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Child 

Other relatives 

Nonrelatives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 

Persons per household 

Persons per family 

Persons 65 years and over 

In households 

Householder 

Nonfamily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Other relatives 

Nonrelatives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 

FAMILY TYPE BY PRESENCE OF OWN CHILDREN 

Families 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

Married-couple families 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

MARITAL STATUS 

Males 15 years and over 

Never married 

Now married, except separated 

Separated 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Females 15 years and over 

Never married 

Now married, except separated 

Separated 

Widowed 

Divorced 



5.7 
2.2 



4 032 

354 
350 
349 
341 
277 
508 
515 
408 
359 
348 
173 
50 

146 

2 908 

2 772 

2 573 

775 

695 

32.4 

2 203 

183 
170 
161 
169 
146 
299 
280 
227 
207 
218 
108 
35 

73 

1 655 

1 579 

1 487 

469 

425 

34.3 

1 829 

28.4 



4 032 

3 855 
1 293 
956 
337 
300 
431 
1 466 
554 
111 
177 



2.98 
3.56 
571 

448 

332 

142 

132 

70 

33 

13 

123 



956 

441 
916 
431 

199 
415 
468 

230 



1 290 

522 

473 

110 

98 

87 

1 689 

560 

474 
188 
345 
122 



2.5 
1.0 



2 226 

140 
118 
101 
93 
212 
464 
293 
140 
120 
187 
227 
131 

54 

1 851 

1 824 

1 738 

610 

591 

34.6 

1 154 

68 
59 
46 
35 
85 
195 
124 
66 
69 
121 
173 
113 

25 
974 
963 
931 
453 
439 
41,6 
1 072 
30.5 



2 226 

1 851 
930 
406 
524 
453 
239 
432 
127 
123 
321 
54 

1.99 

2.97 

545 

399 

325 

223 

218 

54 

16 

4 

146 



406 

175 
326 
239 

94 
176 
142 

76 
142 



886 

397 

331 
26 
36 
96 

981 

249 
271 

53 
315 

93 



4.8 

1.9 



4 555 

297 
254 

231 
228 
389 
938 
621 
354 
354 
511 
317 
61 

130 
3 723 
3 640 
3 491 
1 078 

1 011 
34.3 

2 545 

136 
123 
113 
115 
211 
498 
327 
194 
221 
329 
229 
49 

61 

2 149 

2 104 

2 025 

732 

683 

36.8 

2 010 

31.6 



4 555 

4 484 

2 195 

1 146 

1 049 

893 

778 

1 074 

202 

235 

46 

25 

2.04 
2.79 
889 

870 
655 

374 

363 

182 

24 

9 

17 

2 



1 146 



778 

272 
481 
316 

177 
298 



1 600 

514 

833 

50 

54 

149 

2 173 

528 
824 
97 
430 
294 



5.3 
2.0 



3 305 

185 
220 
210 
167 
158 
467 
492 
387 
406 
442 
147 
24 

78 

2 649 

2 593 

2 492 

855 

767 

40.0 

1 821 

109 

127 

107 

79 

80 

254 

268 

208 

235 

251 

84 

19 



42 

1 456 

1 432 

1 385 

497 

447 

40.7 

1 484 

39.1 



3 305 

3 305 

1 398 

1 004 

394 

353 

856 

906 

81 

64 



2.36 
2.84 
613 

613 
402 
150 
146 
192 
17 
2 



1 004 

392 
672 
856 
321 
563 
126 
67 
100 



1 212 

247 
872 

10 
23 
60 

1 478 

236 
872 

18 
202 
150 



4.0 
1.5 



3 558 

192 
198 
238 
214 
305 
653 
522 
414 
415 
288 
99 
20 

71 

2 898 

2 807 

2 658 

631 

541 

34.6 

1 839 

92 

98 

123 

99 

159 

314 

268 

228 

225 

153 

63 

17 

32 

1 514 

1 468 

1 399 

343 

295 

36.4 

1 719 

33.2 



3 558 

3 558 
1 471 
1 034 
437 
372 
853 
970 
164 
100 



2.42 
2.92 
407 

407 
257 

100 
100 



42 



1 034 

407 
677 
853 
323 
551 
143 
67 
106 



1 404 

389 
887 

15 
19 
94 

1 526 

285 

888 
33 
172 
148 



9.1 
3.5 



4 482 

300 
339 

341 
288 
209 
641 
877 
513 
475 
367 
108 
24 

117 

3 431 

3 305 

3 173 

726 

632 

36.3 

2 328 

130 
159 
185 
157 
108 
341 
452 
265 
247 
202 
66 
16 

48 
1 818 
1 749 

1 675 
403 
355 

36.7 

2 154 
35.8 



4 482 

4 482 

1 685 

1 329 

356 

309 

1 171 

1 426 

107 

93 



2.66 
3.03 
499 
499 
318 
132 
128 
137 
36 



1 329 

664 
1 131 
1 171 

577 
1 010 

125 
71 



1 648 

311 

1 195 

25 

36 

81 

1 854 

322 

1 197 
25 

179 
131 



80.3 
31.0 



5 502 

440 
512 
560 
441 
315 
939 

1 011 
587 
344 
222 
111 

20 

193 

3 895 

3 706 

3 481 

508 

442 

30.5 

2 903 

212 
272 
315 
236 
169 
514 
517 
291 
169 
137 
59 
12 

98 
2 058 
1 959 

1 835 
292 
260 

30.1 

2 599 
30.8 



502 

502 
819 
472 
347 
306 
162 
091 
316 
114 



3.02 
3.42 
353 

353 

237 
91 
87 
71 
37 



1 472 

839 

1 603 

1 162 

667 

1 274 

253 

153 

296 



1 886 

467 

1 205 

63 

40 
111 



1 1 



104 

479 
99 



30.6 



4 131 

342 
355 
329 
397 
274 



414 

312 

211 

87 

28 



137 

3 026 

2 861 

2 649 

467 

408 

30.5 

2 203 

178 
183 
164 
192 
152 
366 
378 
228 
157 
129 
56 
20 

1 



643 
570 
450 
279 
249 
31.5 
1 928 
29.2 



4 131 

4 014 

1 422 

1 129 

293 

267 

818 

1 525 

175 

74 

117 



2.82 
3.23 
326 

249 

172 
90 



196 
142 



1 129 

658 
1 166 
818 
440 
788 
266 
196 
335 



1 427 

423 

851 
41 
38 
74 

1 678 

371 
857 
94 
184 
172 



3.1 

1.2 



137 

10 
6 
2 



19 
12 
4 
3 
2 

4 
117 
115 
107 
6 
6 
28.1 

80 

7 

2 

2 

2 

17 

27 

10 

7 

4 

1 

1 

1 

69 

69 

64 

3 

3 

27.6 

57 

28.6 



137 

136 
74 
35 
39 
27 
20 
24 
3 
15 



1.84 

2.34 

5 

5 
4 
2 
2 



35 



20 
20 



50 

19 

21 

2 



69 

23 
21 

5 
3 
17 



2 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table l. General Characteristics of Persons: 1990— Con 



[For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Florence city, Florence County— Con. 



Tract 3 (pt.) Tract 5 (pt.) Tract 6 (pt.) Tract 7 (pt ) Tract 8 (pt.) Tract 9 (pt.) Tract 10 (pt.) Tract 11 (pt.) Tract 12 (pt. 



Tract 13 (pt.) 



LAND AREA 

Square kilometers 

Square miles 

AGE 

All persons 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 years and over 

3 and 4 years 

16 years and over 

18 years and over 

21 years and over 

60 years and over 

62 years and over 

Median 

Female 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 years and over 

3 and 4 years 

16 years ond over 

18 years and over 

21 years and over 

60 years and over 

62 years and over 

Median 

Male 

Median age 

HOUSEHOLD TYPE AND RELATIONSHIP 

All persons 

In households 

Householder 

Family householder 

Nonfamily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Child 

Other relatives 

Nonrelotives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 

Persons per household 

Persons per family 

Persons 65 years and over 

In households 

Householder 

Nonfamily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Other relatives 

Nonrelatives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 

FAMILY TYPE BY PRESENCE OF OWN CHILDREN 

Families 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

Married-couple families 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

MARITAL STATUS 

Males 15 years and over 

Never married 

Now married, except separated 

Separated 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Females 15 years and over 

Never married 

Now married, except separated 

Separoted 

Widowed 

Divorced 



1.1 
,4 



396 

30 
31 
43 
45 
23 
64 
82 
30 
22 
17 
9 

15 

278 

262 

239 

38 

32 

30.1 

224 

18 
12 
23 
22 
13 
37 
53 
12 
14 
13 
7 



11 
164 
158 
145 
27 
22 
32.0 
172 
26.0 



396 

396 



10 
7 

62 
160 

47 
9 



3.36 

3.49 

26 

26 
15 
2 
1 
5 
4 
2 



108 

58 

112 
62 
35 
73 
39 
19 
33 



121 

49 

62 

2 

1 
7 

171 

59 
64 
17 
20 
11 



43.0 
5 

30.5 



3.00 

3.00 

1 

1 
1 



3.5 

1.4 



1 108 

101 

114 

114 

87 

47 

247 

212 

85 

44 

45 

12 

33 
758 
724 
682 
74 
66 
29.4 

566 

45 
62 
51 
38 
30 
129 
112 
43 
26 
22 



18 
398 
383 
365 
38 
36 
29.9 
542 
29.2 



1 108 

1 108 

360 

319 

41 

34 

270 

434 

27 

17 



3.08 

3.29 

57 

57 

32 

5 

5 

17 
7 
1 



319 

210 
367 
270 

175 

309 

43 

30 
51 



371 

77 

274 

7 

13 

408 

70 

273 

8 

22 
35 



3.2 

1.2 



3 326 

276 
198 
267 
318 
280 
602 
477 
292 
220 
228 
124 
44 



93 

2 517 

2 406 

2 216 

511 

474 

30.7 

1 846 

130 
116 
141 
146 
157 
318 
265 
171 
137 
146 
85 
34 

39 

1 425 

1 378 

1 282 

340 

316 

32.4 

1 480 

28.6 



i 326 

I 629 
935 
617 
318 
282 
212 
994 
383 
105 
419 
278 

2.81 

3.58 

396 

385 

296 

166 

160 

42 

36 

11 



617 

304 
626 
212 



360 

205 
419 



1 126 

700 

237 

65 

59 

65 

1 459 

725 

249 

152 

257 

76 



3.5 

1.4 



5 443 

480 
440 
565 
604 
415 
678 
766 
545 
398 
351 
166 
35 



175 

3 826 

3 578 

3 255 

737 

655 

28.2 

3 036 

241 
222 
262 

317 
214 
411 
445 
332 
247 
207 
112 
26 

86 
2 242 
2 119 

1 943 
466 
414 
31.5 

2 407 
23.9 



443 

443 
673 
317 
356 
318 
597 
230 
799 
144 



3.25 
3.75 
552 

552 
387 

147 

139 

83 

66 

16 



1 317 

682 
1 347 
597 
290 
569 
641 
369 
737 



1 647 

725 
650 

154 
67 

51 

2 311 

872 
651 
249 
394 
145 



2.4 
.9 



3 298 

280 
281 
286 
278 
228 
406 
404 
331 
299 
314 
143 
48 

119 

2 395 

2 280 

2 120 

674 

608 

32.9 

1 819 

138 
137 
140 
137 
120 
245 
222 
187 
174 
194 
90 
35 

57 

1 378 

1 317 

1 241 

411 

373 

34.8 

1 479 

28.7 



3 298 

3 121 

1 054 

769 

285 

249 

331 

1 170 

467 

99 

177 



2.96 
3.56 
505 

382 
284 
127 

117 
53 
32 
13 

123 



769 

351 
728 
331 
149 
312 
391 
193 
402 



1 047 

435 

365 

97 

88 

62 

1 404 

470 
368 

161 
304 

101 



2.5 

10 



2 226 

140 
118 
101 
93 
212 
464 
293 
140 
120 
187 
227 
131 

54 

1 851 

1 824 

1 738 

610 

591 

34.6 

1 154 

68 
59 
46 
35 
85 
195 
124 
66 
69 
121 
173 
113 

25 
974 
963 
931 
453 
439 
41.6 
1 072 
30.5 



2 226 

1 851 
930 
406 
524 
453 
239 
432 
127 
123 
321 
54 

1.99 

2.97 

545 

399 

325 

223 

218 

54 

16 

4 

146 



406 

175 
326 
239 

94 
176 
142 

76 
142 



886 

397 

331 
26 
36 
96 

981 

249 
271 

53 
315 

93 



4.6 
1,8 



4 555 

297 
254 
231 
228 
389 
938 
621 
354 
354 
511 
317 
61 



130 
3 723 

3 640 
3 491 
1 078 

1 011 
34.3 

2 545 

136 
123 
113 
115 
211 
498 
327 
194 
221 
329 
229 
49 

61 

2 149 

2 104 

2 025 

732 

683 

36.8 

2 010 

31.6 



4 555 

4 484 

2 195 

1 146 

1 049 

893 

778 

1 074 

202 

235 

46 

25 

2.04 

2.79 

889 

870 

655 

374 

363 

182 

24 

9 

17 

2 



1 146 

468 
808 
778 
272 
481 
316 
177 
298 



1 600 

514 

833 

50 

54 

149 

2 173 

528 
824 
97 
430 
294 



50 
1.9 



3 188 

179 
216 
203 
160 
150 
446 
480 
372 
395 
424 
141 
22 

75 

2 552 

2 499 

2 400 

819 

735 

39.9 

1 758 

107 

124 

104 

75 

77 

245 

259 

201 

228 

241 

79 

18 

42 

1 403 

1 381 

1 334 

475 

428 

40.6 

1 430 

39.2 



188 

188 
342 
966 
376 
337 
831 
879 
74 
62 



2.38 
2.85 
587 
587 
387 
143 
139 
184 
14 
2 



966 

378 
650 
831 
313 
549 
117 
61 
92 



1 167 

233 

847 

10 

22 

55 

1 423 

225 

847 

18 
192 
141 



2.4 
9 



2 158 

100 
119 
162 
122 
172 
403 
327 
256 
256 
170 
58 
13 

43 

1 763 

1 705 

1 625 

387 

331 

35.0 

1 124 

49 

62 

86 

64 

89 

201 

169 

137 

138 

85 

32 

12 

21 
921 
888 
851 
205 
172 
35.6 
1 034 
34.5 



158 

158 
887 
641 
246 
204 
547 
574 
83 
67 



2.43 
2.88 
241 

241 
141 
43 
43 
75 
25 



641 

246 

411 

547 

201 

340 

73 

35 

59 



850 

226 

565 

4 

11 
44 

927 

188 

564 

19 

74 

82 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 3 



Table 1. General Characteristics of Persons: 1990— Con. 



[For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Florence city, Florence County— Con. 



Tract 14 (pt.) Tract 15.01 (pt.) Tract 16.01 (pt.) 



Remainder of Florence County 



Tract 1 



Tract 2.01 (pt.) 



Tract 2.02 (pt.) 



Tract 3 (pt.) 



Tract 4 



153.7 
59.4 



4 068 

347 
316 
288 
331 
492 
614 
598 
463 
264 
207 
103 
45 

137 

3 062 

2 941 

2 691 

476 

432 

293 

2 056 

176 
151 
138 
162 
240 
310 
307 
228 
135 
106 
70 
33 

67 
1 564 
1 507 

1 382 
269 
246 

30.4 

2 012 
282 



4 068 

3 953 

1 446 

1 055 

391 

287 

815 

1 303 

205 

184 

88 

27 

2.73 
3.20 
355 
264 

172 
55 
51 
69 
19 
4 
85 
6 



1 055 

551 
996 
815 
402 
716 
186 
118 
227 



1 526 

495 

863 

40 

38 

90 

1 591 

402 
855 

67 
160 
107 



LAND AREA 

Squore kilometers 

Square miles 

AGE 

All persons 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 years and over 

3 ond 4 years 

16 years and over 

18 years and over 

21 years and over 

60 years and over 

62 years and over 

Median 

Female 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 years and over 

3 and 4 years 

16 years and over 

18 years and over 

21 years and over 

60 years and over 

62 years and over 

Median 

Male 

Median age 

HOUSEHOLD TYPE AND RELATIONSHIP 

All persons 

In households 

Householder 

Family householder 

Nonfamily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Child 

Other relatives 

Nonrelatives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 

Persons per household 

Persons per family 

Persons 65 years and over 

In households 

Householder 

Nonfamily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Other relatives 

Nonrelatives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 

FAMILY TYPE BY PRESENCE OF OWN CHILDREN 

Families 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

Married-couple families 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

MARITAL STATUS 

Males 15 years and over 

Never married 

Now morried, except separated 

Separated 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Females 15 years and over 

Never married 

Now morried, except separated 

Separated 

Widowed 

Divorced 



5.4 
2.1 



3 715 

237 
277 
281 
237 

175 
516 
738 
435 
400 
317 
83 
19 

89 

2 862 

2 759 

2 650 

620 

534 

36.8 

1 950 

102 

136 

157 

127 

92 

286 

377 

226 

207 

174 

51 

15 



37 

1 523 

1 469 

1 410 

344 

300 

36.9 

1 765 

36.6 



3 715 

3 715 

1 388 

1 124 

264 

222 

1 000 

1 172 

79 

76 



2.68 

3.00 

419 

419 

261 

94 

90 

123 

28 

7 



1 124 

542 

925 

1 000 

473 

825 

100 

56 

80 



1 365 

255 

1 013 

16 

27 

54 

1 555 

266 
1 016 

24 
144 
105 



231 

32 
33 

27 
21 
12 
32 
26 
12 

9 
14 
11 

2 

10 
136 
124 
114 
35 
31 
20.6 

164 

20 

10 

16 

15 

10 

30 

23 

9 

6 

14 

9 

2 

8 
116 
109 
99 
31 
27 
28.3 
67 
9.8 



231 

231 

104 

69 

35 

34 

8 

113 

3 

3 



2.22 
2.80 
27 
27 
27 
26 
26 



69 

60 

101 

8 

4 

7 

59 

54 

89 



1 

2 

118 

39 

9 
14 
24 
32 



32.6 
12.6 



4 341 

312 

316 
381 
317 
242 
840 
926 
480 
243 
136 
96 
52 



134 

3 264 

3 132 

2 969 

401 

354 

32.6 

2 212 

157 

141 

194 

146 

126 

434 

477 

231 

116 

71 

75 

44 

73 
1 689 
1 624 

1 553 
246 
218 

33.4 

2 129 
31.8 



4 341 

4 162 

1 487 

1 218 

269 

226 

1 065 

1 438 

92 

80 

179 



2.80 
3.13 
284 

174 
101 
30 
29 
48 
24 
1 
110 



1 218 

692 
1 166 
1 065 

596 
1 025 

122 
77 

111 



1 612 

366 

1 115 

26 

27 

78 

1 720 

311 

1 106 

27 

148 

128 



12.0 
4.6 



2 018 

140 

161 
197 
155 
132 
263 
360 
274 
193 
102 
36 
5 

61 

1 489 

1 432 

1 336 

233 

187 

33.7 

1 020 

69 

91 

97 

73 

63 

131 

184 

142 

88 

55 

24 

3 

23 
749 
721 
675 
125 
101 

34.0 
998 

33.3 



018 

016 
699 
572 
127 
113 
483 
732 
66 
36 



288 
3.24 
143 

143 
87 
25 
25 
40 
16 



572 

309 

555 

483 

252 

453 

67 

45 

81 



757 

189 

499 

17 

10 

42 

763 

149 
497 
22 
47 
48 



8.7 
3.4 



3 338 

189 
192 
224 
238 
285 
621 
579 
425 
323 
206 
53 
3 

73 

2 683 

2 577 

2 444 

417 

358 

33.6 

1 763 

96 

89 

106 

126 

166 

324 

304 

221 

178 

117 

33 

3 



1 
1 
1 313 



34 
446 
385 
313 
237 
205 
34.1 
1 575 
330 



3 338 

3 338 
1 351 
961 
390 
302 
804 
973 
98 
112 



2.47 

2.95 

262 

262 

182 

67 

66 

63 

16 

1 



961 

442 
715 
804 
354 
583 
140 
83 
123 



1 261 

305 

825 

35 

13 

83 

1 472 

331 
831 
32 
125 
153 



33.0 
12.7 



3 342 

219 
255 
281 
327 
197 
380 
613 
406 
381 
226 
50 
7 



106 

2 521 

2 382 

2 219 

437 

375 

35.2 

1 771 

111 
120 
144 
174 
108 
215 
318 
229 
200 
121 
26 
5 

49 

1 362 

1 285 

1 198 

233 

197 

35.3 

1 571 

34.9 



3 342 

3 342 

1 133 

939 

194 

167 

709 

1 238 

193 

69 



2.95 

3.28 

283 

283 

184 

60 

56 

72 

21 

6 



939 

470 
828 
709 
345 
620 
196 
113 
188 



1 191 

330 

753 

28 

19 

61 

1 396 

379 

741 
51 
117 
108 



4 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 1 General Characteristics of Persons: 1990— Con. 



[For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 5 (pt.; 



Tract 6 (pt.) 



Tract 7 (pt.) 



Tract 8 (pt.) 



Tract 9 (pt.) 



Tract 10 (pt.) 



Tract 11 (pt.) 



Tract 12 (pt.) 



LAND AREA 

Square kilometers 

Square miles 

AGE 

All persons 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 years and over 

3 and 4 years 

16 years and over 

18 years and over 

21 years and over 

60 years and over 

62 years and over 

Median 

Female 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 years and over 

3 and 4 years 

16 years and over 

18 years and over 

21 years and over 

60 years and over 

62 years and over 

Median . 

Male 

Median age . 

HOUSEHOLD TYPE AND RELATIONSHIP 

All persons 

In households 

Householder 

Family householder 

Nonfamily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Child 

Other relatives 

Nonrelatives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 

Persons per household 

Persons per family 

Persons 65 years and over 

In households 

Householder 

Nonfamily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Other relatives 

Nonrelatives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 

FAMILY TYPE BY PRESENCE OF OWN CHILDREN 

Families 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

Married-couple families 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

MARITAL STATUS 

Males 15 years and over 

Never married 

Now married, except separated 

Separated 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Females 15 years and over 

Never married 

Now married, except seporated 

Separated 

Widowed 

Divorced 



72.7 
28.1 



4 228 

290 
291 
277 
602 
629 
625 
567 
416 
265 
198 
58 
10 

121 

3 316 

3 201 

2 532 

390 

342 

25.4 

2 259 

161 
143 
146 
331 
354 
333 
289 
202 
137 
118 
36 
9 

55 

1 787 

1 727 

1 332 

232 

207 

24.9 

1 969 

26.1 



1 21 



228 

582 
335 
978 
357 
294 
684 
212 
218 
133 



646 

2.68 
3.16 
266 

266 
180 
76 
74 
46 
34 
6 



6.1 

2.4 



2 242 

115 
118 
132 
173 
144 
305 
393 
323 
289 
188 
53 
9 

40 

1 847 

1 786 

1 672 

391 

332 

38.4 

1 149 

66 
60 
62 



153 
193 
172 
144 
113 
33 
5 

26 
949 
925 
863 
224 
194 
40.1 
1 093 
37.3 



2 242 

2 242 
860 
689 
171 
158 
588 
662 
92 
40 



2,61 
2.95 
250 

250 
171 
66 
64 
60 
16 
3 



2.6 
1.0 



1 449 

146 
117 
138 
149 
110 
187 
172 
165 
107 
100 
47 
11 

58 
1 012 
946 
880 
208 
189 
28.4 

782 

65 
54 
64 
74 
70 
105 
97 
93 
54 
62 
35 
9 

23 
585 
551 
511 
132 
122 

30.1 
667 

25.1 



1 449 

1 449 
480 
358 
122 
110 
172 
550 
199 
48 



3.02 
3.57 
158 

158 

119 



46 

22 

15 

2 



3.0 
1.2 



235 

12 
16 
22 
26 
21 
24 
34 
37 
29 
10 
4 



2 
179 
170 
152 
28 
24 
32.9 

132 



15 
11 
12 

24 
19 
17 
5 
3 



87 
16 
13 

35.7 
103 

31.3 



235 

235 
73 
60 
13 
13 
35 
89 
36 
2 



3.22 

3.67 

14 

14 
11 
4 
4 
1 
2 



3.3 
1.3 



734 

74 
69 
63 
63 
49 
102 
111 
77 
60 
34 
30 
2 

27 
513 
492 
453 
101 

87 
29.4 

384 

45 
33 
21 
32 
26 
54 
58 
40 
33 
24 
18 

16 
277 
262 
246 
58 
52 
31.0 
350 
27.8 



734 

734 

239 

187 

52 

51 

100 

296 

87 

12 



3.07 

3.58 

66 

66 
48 
15 
15 

17 



978 


689 


358 


60 


187 


519 


252 


183 


22 


90 


904 


408 


360 


39 


188 


684 


588 


172 


35 


100 


346 


216 


79 


12 


50 


602 


357 


156 


22 


103 


224 


72 


153 


22 


77 


137 


26 


90 


10 


37 


242 


36 


183 


17 


79 


1 561 


916 


449 


79 


243 


631 


218 


188 


32 


87 


717 


611 


183 


38 


108 


47 


14 


30 


2 


13 


30 


12 


24 


1 


10 


136 


61 


24 


6 


25 


1 809 


961 


599 


106 


285 


' 691 


163 


201 


34 


90 


732 


609 


190 


38 


106 


73 


11 


49 


9 


27 


173 


114 


112 


15 


41 


140 


64 


47 


10 


21 



117 

6 

4 

7 

7 

8 

21 

12 

15 

11 

18 

6 

2 

3 
97 
94 
92 
36 
32 
42.1 

63 

2 
3 

3 
4 
3 
9 
9 
7 
7 

10 
5 
1 

53 
51 
51 
22 
19 

42.8 
54 

32.5 



117 

117 
56 
38 
18 
16 
25 
27 
7 
2 



209 

2.55 

26 

26 

15 
7 
7 
8 
3 



38 

14 
22 
25 

8 

14 
9 
6 
8 



45 

14 
25 

1 
5 

55 

11 
25 

10 
9 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 5 



Table 1. General Characteristics of Persons: 1990— Con. 

[For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 13 (pt.) 


Tract 14 (pt.) 


Tract 15.01 (pt.) 


Tract 15.02 


Tract 16.01 (pt.) 


Tract 16.02 


1.6 


3.8 


79.9 


99.1 


30.2 


154.8 


6 


1.5 


30.9 


38.3 


11.6 


59.8 


1 400 


767 


5 502 


4 425 


3 900 


3 901 


92 


63 


440 


306 


310 


231 


79 


62 


512 


362 


322 


291 


76 


60 


560 


410 


302 


307 


92 


51 


441 


372 


376 


324 


133 


34 


315 


294 


262 


274 


250 


125 


939 


687 


656 


598 


195 


139 


1 011 


719 


668 


637 


158 


78 


587 


521 


402 


402 


159 


75 


344 


329 


303 


353 


118 


50 


222 


293 


197 


267 


41 


25 


111 


111 


76 


147 


7 


5 


20 


21 


26 


70 


28 


28 


193 


144 


127 


99 


1 135 


569 


3 895 


3 271 


2 890 


2 999 


1 102 


546 


3 706 


3 117 


2 737 


2 870 


1 033 


523 


3 481 


2 895 


2 535 


2 690 


244 


106 


508 


584 


432 


647 


210 


98 


442 


522 


377 


582 


33.7 


34.5 


30.5 


31.9 


30.9 


33.8 


715 


378 


2 903 


2 290 


2 039 


1 970 


43 


28 


212 


147 


158 


111 


36 


23 


272 


171 


173 


134 


37 


28 


315 


206 


148 


147 


35 


30 


236 


203 


177 


158 


70 


16 


169 


159 


142 


122 


113 


55 


514 


355 


336 


322 


99 


75 


517 


380 


355 


304 


91 


39 


291 


260 


219 


204 


87 


40 


169 


167 


151 


171 


68 


28 


137 


161 


115 


148 


31 


15 


59 


63 


47 


94 


5 


1 


12 


18 


18 


55 


11 


11 


98 


71 


60 


51 


593 


295 


2 058 


1 728 


1 527 


1 545 


580 


280 


1 959 


1 644 


1 461 


1 485 


548 


265 


1 835 


1 517 


1 351 


1 397 


138 


59 


292 


326 


248 


378 


123 


55 


260 


294 


222 


347 


37.6 


35.9 


30.1 


32.4 


31.8 


34.7 


685 


389 


2 599 


2 135 


1 861 


1 931 


31.1 


33.3 


30.8 


31.2 


30.0 


32.8 


1 400 


767 


5 502 


4 425 


3 900 


3 901 


1 400 


767 


5 502 


4 425 


3 783 


3 771 


584 


297 


1 819 


1 508 


1 318 


1 310 


393 


205 


1 472 


1 216 


1 060 


1 058 


191 


92 


347 


292 


258 


252 


168 


87 


306 


261 


233 


227 


306 


171 


1 162 


962 


810 


851 


396 


254 


2 091 


1 582 


1 412 


1 324 


81 


28 


316 


270 


172 


208 


33 


17 


114 


103 


71 


78 




- 


- 


- 


117 


130 


2.40 


2.58 


3.02 


2.93 


2.87 


2.88 


2.99 


3.21 


3.42 


3.31 


3.26 


3.25 


166 


80 


353 


425 


299 


484 


166 


80 


353 


425 


222 


368 


116 


57 


237 


286 


145 


253 


57 


38 


91 


115 


64 


92 


57 


38 


87 


108 


63 


89 


33 


14 


71 


93 


47 


82 


17 


8 


37 


40 


29 


30 


_ 


1 


8 


6 


1 


3 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


77 


116 



Tract 17 



Tract 18 



LAND AREA 

Square kilometers 

Square miles 

AGE 

All persons 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 years and over 

3 and 4 years 

16 years and over 

18 years and over 

21 years and over 

60 years and over 

62 years and over 

Median 

Female 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 years and over 

3 and 4 years 

16 years and over 

18 years and over 

21 years and over 

60 years and over 

62 years and over 

Median _ 

Male 

Median age 

HOUSEHOLD TYPE AND RELATIONSHIP 

All persons 

In households 

Householder 

Family householder 

Nonfamily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Child 

Other relatives 

Nonrelatives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 

Persons per household 

Persons per family 

Persons 65 years and over 

In households 

Householder 

Nonfamily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Other relatives 

Nonrelatives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 

FAMILY TYPE BY PRESENCE OF OWN CHILDREN 

Families 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

Married-couple families 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

MARITAL STATUS 

Males 15 years and over 

Never married 

Now married, except separated 

Separated 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Females 15 years and over 

Never married 

Now married, except separated 

Separated- 

Widowed 

Divorced 



173.8 
67,1 



1 942 

128 
161 
172 
175 
110 
258 
316 
209 
194 
146 
66 
7 

55 

1 445 

1 370 

1 290 

307 

273 

33.7 

994 

66 
68 
80 
92 
64 
133 
161 
109 
100 
85 
32 
4 

27 
761 
728 
679 
167 
151 

34.1 
948 

33.4 



1 942 

1 942 
657 
519 
138 
129 
399 
694 
164 
28 



2.96 
3.42 
219 
219 

154 
63 
61 
46 
17 
2 



203.2 
78.5 



3 554 

205 
248 
324 
321 
208 
514 
530 
412 
327 
285 
160 
20 



76 

2 714 

2 584 

2 413 

622 

561 

34.1 

1 823 

97 
104 
140 
163 
103 
274 
265 
217 
181 
162 
102 

15 

32 

1 454 

1 391 

1 303 

364 

333 

35.9 

1 731 

32.3 



554 

554 
301 
997 
304 
282 
733 
227 
250 
43 



2.73 
3.22 
465 

465 

333 

155 

149 

92 

39 

1 



393 


205 


1 472 


1 216 


1 060 


1 058 


519 


997 


161 


122 


839 


628 


598 


512 


257 


469 


266 


206 


1 603 


1 150 


1 065 


903 


484 


849 


306 


171 


1 162 


962 


810 


851 


399 


733 


122 


104 


667 


501 


436 


420 


204 


341 


211 


185 


1 274 


922 


781 


738 


377 


601 


70 


25 


253 


187 


207 


156 


94 


202 


32 


15 


153 


90 


142 


69 


44 


101 


47 


18 


296 


170 


246 


132 


88 


209 


554 


283 


1 886 


1 581 


1 406 


1 494 


701 


1 295 


163 


56 


467 


390 


414 


376 


186 


373 


322 


182 


1 205 


1 010 


843 


908 


423 


769 


11 


9 


63 


49 


40 


63 


26 


54 


8 


9 


40 


47 


37 


47 


31 


44 


50 


27 


111 


85 


72 


100 


35 


55 


599 


299 


2 104 


1 766 


1 560 


1 578 


780 


1 482 


97 


56 


479 


402 


332 


300 


185 


320 


324 


181 


1 199 


1 010 


848 


895 


425 


769 


14 


1 


88 


47 


80 


62 


32 


73 


98 


35 


196 


196 


160 


241 


101 


239 


66 


26 


142 


111 


140 


80 


37 


81 



6 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table l. General Characteristics of Persons: 1990— Con 



[For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 19 



ract 20 


Trod 22.01 


Tract 22.02 


137.0 


33.8 


41.4 


52.9 


13.1 


16.0 


4 145 


5 817 


3 372 


312 


500 


287 


359 


574 


296 


367 


607 


288 


325 


488 


231 


301 


401 


170 


609 


881 


460 


596 


759 


480 


419 


512 


343 


382 


429 


316 


268 


401 


318 


169 


225 


155 


38 


40 


28 


128 


196 


122 


3 032 


4 032 


2 446 


2 901 


3 810 


2 367 


2 726 


3 566 


2 233 


641 


893 


648 


571 


814 


600 


31.9 


28.9 


34.3 


2 126 


3 209 


1 844 


162 


247 


129 


162 


289 


141 


180 


299 


138 


157 


236 


114 


139 


207 


109 


323 


502 


267 


303 


442 


248 


217 


284 


188 


201 


255 


182 


142 


255 


201 


106 


163 


106 


34 


30 


21 


66 


97 


53 


1 589 


2 328 


1 410 


1 523 


2 222 


1 368 


1 440 


2 099 


1 297 


369 


580 


409 


328 


537 


382 


33.2 


31.5 


35.9 


2 019 


2 608 


1 528 


30.4 


25.3 


31.8 


4 145 


5 817 


3 372 


4 067 


5 814 


3 357 


1 362 


1 932 


1 220 


1 090 


1 456 


907 


272 


476 


313 


245 


423 


283 


826 


782 


594 


1 506 


2 191 


1 152 


297 


743 


307 


76 


166 


84 


78 


- 


15 


- 


3 


- 


2.99 


3.01 


2.75 


3.41 


3.55 


3.26 


475 


666 


501 


410 


666 


501 


294 


475 


341 


105 


215 


155 


101 


205 


148 


87 


122 


109 


25 


56 


39 


4 


13 


12 


65 


- 


- 



Tract 23 



Tract 24 98 



Tract 25 



Tract 26 



LAND AREA 

Square kilometers 

Square miles 

AGE 

All persons 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 years and over 

3 and 4 years 

16 years and over 

18 years and over 

21 years and over 

60 years and over 

62 years and over 

Median 

Female 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 years and over 

3 and 4 years 

16 years and over 

18 years and over 

21 years and over 

60 years ond over 

62 years ond over 

Median _ 

Male 

Median age 

HOUSEHOLD TYPE AND RELATIONSHIP 

All persons 

In households 

Householder 

Family householder 

Nonfamily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Child 

Other relatives 

Nonrelatives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 

Persons per household 

Persons per family 

Persons 65 years and over 

In households 

Householder 

Nonfamily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Other relatives 

Nonrelatives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 

FAMILY TYPE BY PRESENCE OF OWN CHILDREN 
Families 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

Married-couple families 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 yeors 

Female householder, no husband present 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

MARITAL STATUS 

Males 15 years and over 

Never married 

Now married, except separated 

Separated 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Females 15 years and over 

Never married 

Now married, except separated 

Separated 

Widowed 

Divorced 



237.7 
91.8 



6 111 

457 
543 
548 
569 
400 
942 
916 
642 
456 
419 
188 
31 



203 

4 431 

4 203 

3 912 

843 

772 

30.7 

3 160 
221 

253 
259 
280 
209 
502 
457 
338 
243 
238 
134 
26 

100 

2 354 

2 246 

2 109 

517 

481 

32.1 

2 951 

28.6 



6 111 

6 110 

2 082 

1 644 

438 

393 

1 221 

2 249 
424 
134 



1 

2.93 
3.37 
638 

638 
441 
190 
184 
135 
54 



1 644 

887 

1 627 

1 221 

658 

1 205 

353 

194 

366 



2 136 

613 

1 272 

84 
37 
130 

2 427 

546 
1 267 
112 
338 
164 



1 090 

532 
1 052 
826 
419 
827 
206 
89 
183 



1 485 

455 

863 

43 

52 

72 

1 622 

341 
874 

70 

241 

96 



1 456 

735 
1 546 
782 
386 
795 
604 
326 
707 



1 762 

660 
838 
100 
62 
102 

2 374 

707 
847 
240 

431 
149 



907 

428 
814 
594 
266 
502 
270 
147 
287 



1 065 

320 

619 
42 
39 
45 

1 436 

351 

624 

98 

274 



139.7 
54.0 



3 081 

194 
236 
268 
247 
232 
442 
499 
379 
272 
209 
88 
15 



78 

2 335 

2 233 

2 081 

436 

379 

33.2 

1 588 

91 
119 
139 
131 
112 
224 
245 
194 
135 
131 
55 
12 

40 

1 215 

1 163 

1 082 

262 

236 

34.3 

1 493 

32.1 



3 081 

3 081 

1 097 

870 

227 

211 

706 

1 068 

166 

44 



2.81 
3.23 
312 

312 

214 
108 
106 
66 
29 
3 



870 

440 
765 
706 
360 
641 
118 
55 
80 



1 144 

260 

744 
32 
35 
73 

1 239 

231 
739 

25 
184 
60 



154.7 
59.7 



3 863 

304 
305 
361 
344 
269 
580 
523 
366 
353 
277 
153 
28 



137 

2 836 

2 698 

2 491 

605 

551 

31.4 

2 047 

164 
171 
163 
185 
146 
293 
265 
194 
174 
173 
102 
17 

79 

1 514 

1 443 

1 330 

364 

338 

31.8 

1 816 

31.0 



3 863 

3 796 

1 275 

989 

286 

263 

730 

1 369 

350 

72 

67 



2.98 

3.48 

458 

405 

273 

127 

125 

87 

41 

4 

53 



989 

504 
970 
730 
373 
689 
208 
111 
242 



1 344 

387 
784 

47 
45 
81 

1 549 

378 

777 
80 

244 
70 



141.7 
54.7 



2 927 

212 
233 
275 
262 
198 
453 
421 
330 
209 
210 
108 
16 

88 

2 157 

2 044 

1 911 

438 

387 

30.8 

1 456 

93 
105 
115 
130 
100 
226 
214 
160 
109 
124 
69 
11 

42 

1 123 

1 068 

996 

260 

231 

32.9 

1 471 

29.1 



2 927 

2 927 
976 
774 
202 
185 
616 

1 048 

221 

66 



3.00 

3.44 

334 

334 

225 

100 

98 

77 

28 

4 



774 

385 
740 
616 
310 
571 
126 
63 
138 



1 064 

323 
633 

24 
31 
53 

1 143 

245 

643 

60 

144 
51 



71.0 
27.4 



3 712 

309 
329 
342 
331 
227 
600 
542 
256 
292 
281 
160 
43 

118 

2 655 

2 506 

2 349 

641 

586 

30.7 

2 028 
145 

159 
186 
154 
121 
336 
293 
129 
170 
182 
119 
34 



57 

1 509 

1 434 

1 360 

424 

391 

32.6 

1 684 

27.9 



3 712 

3 687 

1 246 

943 

303 

276 



374 

394 

85 

25 



296 
3.50 
484 
468 
324 
140 
136 



943 

490 
973 
588 
314 
643 
304 
159 
302 



1 194 

391 
627 

70 
43 
63 

1 538 

392 
636 
113 
311 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 7 



Table 2. General Characteristics of White Persons: 1990 

[Threshold and complementary threshold ore 400 persons. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text) 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Florence, SC MSA 


69 501 


4 140 


4 493 


4 985 


5 123 


4 851 


10 933 


11 400 


8 247 


6 620 


5 463 


2 595 


651 


1 727 


54 897 


52 952 


49 705 


11 884 


10 631 


35.2 


35 957 


2 044 


2 131 


2 406 


2 542 


2 432 


5 584 


5 765 


4 217 


3 442 


3 141 


1 738 


515 


875 


28 911 


27 959 


26 294 


7 071 


6 404 


36.4 


33 544 


33.8 



Florence County 



Total 



Florence city 



Totals for split tracts/BNA's in Florence County 



Tract 2.01 



Tract 3 



Tract 5 



Tract 7 



Tract 10 



AGE 

All persons 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 years and over 

3 and 4 years 

16 years and over 

18 years and over 

21 years and over 

60 years and over 

62 years and over 

Median 

Female 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 years and over 

3 and 4 years 

16 years and over 

18 years and over 

21 years and over 

60 years and over 

62 years and over 

Median 

Male 

Median age 

HOUSEHOLD TYPE AND RELATIONSHIP 

All persons 

In households 

Householder 

Family householder 

Nonfomily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Child 

Other relatives 

Nonrelatives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 

Persons per household 

Persons per family 

Persons 65 years and over 

In households 

Householder 

Nonfamily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Other relatives 

Nonrelatives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 



FAMILY TYPE BY PRESENCE OF OWN CHILDREN 

Families 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

Married-couple families 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

MARITAL STATUS 

Males 15 years and over 

Never married 

Now married, except separated 

Separated 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Females 15 years and over 

Never married 

Now morried, except separated 

Separated 

Widowed 

Divorced 



19 658 

9 138 

15 363 

16 403 
7 566 

12 946 

2 505 

1 239 

1 900 



26 507 



6 


602 


17 


089 




527 




576 


1 


713 


29 


376 


5 


345 


17 


003 




633 


4 


027 


2 


368 



69 501 

4 140 
4 493 

4 985 

5 123 

4 851 

10 933 

11 400 
8 247 

6 620 

5 463 
2 595 

651 

1 727 
54 897 
52 952 
49 705 
11 884 
10 631 
35 2 

35 957 



044 

131 

406 

542 

432 

584 

765 

217 

3 442 

3 141 

1 738 

515 

875 

28 911 

27 959 

26 294 

7 071 

6 404 

36.4 

33 544 

33.8 



19 


658 


9 


138 


15 


363 


16 


403 


7 


566 


12 


946 


2 


505 


1 


239 


1 


900 


26 


507 


6 


602 


17 


089 




527 




576 


1 


713 


29 


376 


5 


345 


17 


003 




633 


4 


027 


2 


368 



15 587 

847 
899 
946 
835 

1 015 

2 662 

2 455 
1 609 
1 573 
1 653 

846 
247 

333 
12 713 
12 397 
11 896 

3 596 
3 278 

37.3 

8 402 

395 
467 
485 
409 
514 
1 370 
1 268 
847 
897 
965 
575 
210 

157 
6 966 



6 562 
2 249 
2 056 

39.3 

7 185 
35.2 



4 219 

1 757 

2 954 

3 470 

1 401 

2 425 
621 
312 
464 



5 840 

1 611 

3 624 

85 

145 

375 

7 055 

1 434 
3 570 

149 
1 172 

730 



1 693 

83 

114 

160 

135 

112 

192 

323 

258 

182 

92 

38 

4 

39 

1 309 

1 259 

1 175 

216 

178 

37.2 

852 

46 
58 
80 
65 
52 
93 
164 
134 
85 
47 
25 
3 

16 
655 
632 
591 
114 
94 
37.5 
841 
36.6 



1 321 

61 

63 

88 

92 

84 

155 

211 

189 

212 

133 

30 

3 

33 

1 087 

1 049 

1 001 

250 

220 

40.6 

680 

32 

34 

47 

45 

45 

81 

104 

104 

106 

67 

13 

2 

16 
554 
534 
512 
123 
103 

40.6 
641 

40.6 



496 

249 

419 

437 

213 

364 

42 

26 

40 



668 

162 

449 

10 

7 
40 

668 

117 

443 

14 

43 

51 



420 

164 

255 

361 

138 

216 

40 

19 

26 



542 

116 

384 

5 

8 

29 

567 

97 

372 

6 

48 

44 



3 138 

177 
168 
196 
461 
449 
452 
412 
362 
224 
177 
51 
9 

78 

2 558 

2 470 

1 960 

339 

303 

27.4 

1 618 

97 

72 

106 

245 

234 

228 

208 

173 

112 

103 

32 

8 

34 

1 329 

1 284 

1 002 

196 

179 

26.9 

1 520 

28.0 



748 
360 
594 
573 
270 
449 
126 
67 
105 



1 254 

482 

601 
32 
26 

113 

1 343 

441 
603 
33 
149 
117 



630 

6 

12 

25 

60 

65 

160 

106 

85 

49 

40 

16 

6 

3 

575 

557 

521 

86 

77 

33.9 

310 

5 
11 
24 
30 
83 
50 
48 
27 
19 
8 
5 

291 
282 
267 
45 
38 
35.4 
320 
33.1 



54 

14 
23 
35 

9 
14 
12 

4 



293 

227 
38 

5 

15 
8 

294 

212 
38 

7 
26 
11 



1 461 

59 
41 
48 
41 
130 
250 
173 
99 
100 
173 
217 
130 

19 

1 307 

1 293 

1 252 

573 

560 

43.8 

805 

29 

23 

23 

17 

50 

97 

79 

42 

56 

111 

165 

113 

7 
727 
720 
702 
427 
416 

63.5 
656 

34.8 



69 501 


69 501 


15 587 


1 693 


1 321 


3 138 


630 


1 461 


67 755 


67 755 


14 875 


1 690 


1 321 


2 663 


206 


1 233 


26 665 


26 665 


6 586 


621 


524 


1 040 


102 


709 


19 658 


19 658 


4 219 


496 


420 


748 


54 


268 


7 007 


7 007 


2 367 


125 


104 


292 


48 


441 


6 106 


6 106 


2 042 


105 


93 


240 


44 


389 


16 384 


16 384 


3 465 


433 


362 


568 


35 


190 


20 722 


20 722 


3 911 


567 


381 


819 


53 


205 


2 389 


2 389 


436 


36 


33 


142 


11 


51 


1 595 


1 595 


477 


33 


21 


94 


5 


78 


1 025 


1 025 


496 


- 


- 


- 


262 


185 


721 


721 


216 


3 


- 


475 


162 


43 


2.54 


2.54 


2.26 


2.75 


2.51 


2.57 


2.03 


1.74 


3.01 


3.01 


2.86 


3.12 


2.83 


3.05 


2.85 


2.67 


8 709 


8 709 


2 746 


134 


166 


237 


62 


520 


8 098 


8 098 


2 572 


134 


166 


237 


56 


379 


5 562 


5 562 


1 806 


82 


108 


157 


44 


306 


2 532 


2 532 


906 


23 


35 


66 


26 


216 


2 468 


2 468 


881 


23 


33 


65 


25 


211 


1 918 


1 918 


631 


37 


49 


43 


8 


54 


548 


548 


110 


15 


7 


32 


2 


15 


70 


70 


25 


- 


2 


5 


2 


4 


602 


602 


171 


- 


- 


- 


5 


141 


9 


9 


3 


- 


- 


- 


1 


— 



268 

81 

148 

191 

62 

115 

60 

18 

32 



583 

230 

245 

15 

28 

65 

730 

143 
212 

18 
286 

71 



8 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 2. General Characteristics of White Persons: 1990-Con 

[Threshold and complementary threshold are 400 persons. For definitions of terms ond meanings of symbols, see text) 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Totals for split tracts/BNA's in Florence County— Con. 



Tract 1 1 



Tract 15.01 



Tract 16.01 



Florence city, Florence County 



Tract 7 (pt.) 



Tract 10 (pt.! 



Tract 11 (pt.) 



Remainder of Florence County 



Tract 2.01 (pt ) 



Tract 3 (pt ) 









AGE 

All persons 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 years and over 

3 and 4 years 

16 years and over 

18 years and over 

21 years and over 

60 years and over 

62 years and over 

Median 

Female 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 years and over 

3 and 4 years 

16 years and over 

18 years and over 

21 years and over 

60 years and over 

62 years and over 

Median 

Mole 

Medion age 

HOUSEHOLD TYPE AND RELATIONSHIP 

All persons 

In households 

Householder 

Family householder 

Nonfamily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Child 

Other relatives 

Nonrelotives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 

Persons per household 

Persons per family 

Persons 65 yeors and over 

In households 

Householder 

Nonfamily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Other relatives 

Nonrelatives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 

FAMILY TYPE BY PRESENCE OF OWN CHILDREN 

Families 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

Married-couple families 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

MARITAL STATUS 

Males 15 years and over 

Never married 

Now married, except separated 

Separated 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Females 15 years and over 

Never married 

Now married, except separated 

Separated 

Widowed 

Divorced 



3 659 

190 
153 
147 
157 
307 
727 
504 
306 
330 
475 
303 
60 

83 
3 133 
3 080 
2 973 

1 016 
953 

37.4 

2 051 

78 

76 

71 

80 

161 

375 

260 

164 

210 

304 

223 

49 

36 

1 808 

1 781 

1 722 

695 

647 

41.7 

1 608 

33.7 



I 659 

i 630 
895 
935 
960 
818 
692 
726 
124 
193 
19 
10 

1.92 
2.65 
838 
828 
623 
364 
353 
174 
22 
9 



935 

331 
527 
691 
227 
385 
206 
93 
128 



1 343 

402 

737 

33 

41 

130 

1 826 

374 
726 
54 
405 
267 



3 371 

258 
289 
309 
218 
185 
625 
660 
399 
228 
139 
47 
14 

105 

2 476 

2 377 

2 260 

302 

255 

32.1 

1 747 

127 

146 

174 

126 

96 

332 

327 

198 

105 

82 

26 

8 

59 

1 279 

1 227 

1 159 

165 

145 

31.5 

1 624 

32.8 



3 371 

3 371 
1 187 
968 
219 
185 
848 
1 167 



2.84 
3.19 
200 

200 
131 
50 
48 
49 
17 
3 



968 

532 
938 
846 
465 
832 
103 
59 
90 



1 215 

234 

865 

22 

11 

83 

1 300 

210 
869 

31 
100 

90 



2 857 

176 
197 
194 
262 
195 
440 
495 
348 
274 
181 
73 
22 

74 
2 241 
2 129 



404 
348 
34.1 

1 491 

93 
101 

90 
114 
105 
229 
259 
186 
133 
115 

51 

15 

39 

1 188 

1 143 

1 067 

245 

218 

35.5 

1 366 

32.7 



2 857 

2 767 

1 046 

808 

238 

214 

635 

935 

95 

56 

90 



265 
3.06 
276 
214 

145 
79 
78 
44 
24 
1 
62 



808 

412 
681 
638 
302 
508 
135 
92 
143 



1 083 

306 

659 

28 

29 

61 

1 207 

206 
666 
49 
154 
132 



526 

4 

9 

21 

52 

58 

150 

92 

63 

38 

27 

11 

1 

2 
481 
465 
435 
56 
48 
32.8 

263 

4 
10 
21 
27 
78 
44 
35 
24 
13 

6 



246 
239 
226 
30 
24 
33.4 
263 
31.6 



526 

102 

49 

24 

25 

23 

12 

31 

7 

3 

262 

162 

2.10 

3.13 

39 

33 
25 

17 

16 

5 

1 

2 
5 
1 



24 

7 
12 
12 
3 
4 
9 
4 



243 

211 

14 

1 

11 

6 

249 

206 
14 

6 
16 

7 



1 461 

59 

41 

48 

41 

130 

250 

173 

99 

100 

173 

217 

130 

19 

1 307 

1 293 

1 252 

573 

560 

43.8 

805 

29 

23 

23 

17 

50 

97 

79 

42 

56 

111 

165 

113 

7 
727 
720 
702 
427 
416 
63.5 
656 
34.8 



1 461 

1 233 
709 
268 

441 

389 

190 

205 

51 

78 

185 

43 

1.74 

2.67 

520 

379 

306 

216 

211 

54 

15 

4 

141 



268 

81 
148 
191 

62 
115 
60 
18 
32 



583 

230 
245 

15 
28 
65 

730 

143 
212 

18 
286 

71 



3 659 

190 
153 
147 
157 
307 
727 
504 
306 
330 
475 
303 
60 

83 
3 133 
3 080 
2 973 

1 016 
953 

374 

2 051 

78 

76 

71 

80 

161 

375 

260 

164 

210 

304 

223 

49 

36 

1 808 

1 781 

1 722 

695 

647 

41.7 

1 608 

33.7 



I 659 

i 630 
895 
935 
960 
818 
692 
726 
124 
193 
19 
10 

1.92 
2.65 
838 

828 
623 
364 
353 
174 
22 
9 



935 

331 
527 
691 
227 
385 
206 
93 
128 



1 343 

402 

737 
33 
41 

130 

1 826 

374 
726 
54 
405 
267 



1 588 

77 
109 
158 
129 

93 
158 
307 
249 
178 

90 

36 
4 

36 
1 218 

1 170 

1 093 

211 

173 

38.0 

796 

43 
56 
78 
64 
39 
76 
156 
129 
81 
47 
24 
3 

16 
606 
583 
546 
112 
92 
38.1 
792 
37.8 



1 588 

1 586 

563 

469 

94 

84 

419 

550 

34 

20 



2.84 
3.17 
130 

130 
78 
21 
21 
37 
15 



469 

234 
405 
422 
207 
360 
33 



32 



625 

144 

433 

8 

7 

33 

619 

102 

428 

10 

40 

39 



1 313 

61 

63 

88 

90 

84 

153 

209 

189 

211 

133 

29 

3 

33 
1 080 
1 042 
995 
248 
219 
40.6 

675 

32 

34 

47 

44 

45 

80 

103 

104 

105 

67 

12 

2 

16 
550 
530 
508 
121 
102 

40.5 
638 

40.6 



1 313 



313 

521 

417 

104 

93 

360 

378 

33 

21 



2.51 
2.83 
165 

165 
107 
35 
33 
49 
7 
2 



417 

163 
254 
359 

137 

215 

39 

19 
26 



539 

115 

382 

5 

8 

29 

562 

96 

370 

6 

46 

44 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 9 



Table 2. General Characteristics of White Persons: 1990— Con. 



[Threshold and complementary threshold are 400 persons. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see texl] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 4 



Tract 5 (pt.) Tract 15.01 (pt.: 



Tract 15.02 Tract 16.01 (pt ) 



Tract 16.02 



Tract 17 



Tract 18 



AGE 

All persons 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 years and over 

3 and 4 years 

16 years and over 

18 years and over 

21 years and over 

60 years and over 

62 years and over 

Median 

Female 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 years and over 

3 and 4 years 

16 years and over 

18 years and over 

21 years and over 

60 years and over 

62 years and over 

Median 

Male 

Median age 

HOUSEHOLD TYPE AND RELATIONSHIP 

All persons 

In households 

Householder 

Family householder 

Nonfamily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Child 

Other relatives 

Nonrelatives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 

Persons per household 

Persons per family 

Persons 65 years and over 

In households 

Householder 

Nonfamily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Other relatives 

Nonrelatives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 

FAMILY TYPE BY PRESENCE OF OWN CHILDREN 

Families 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

Married-couple families 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

MARITAL STATUS 

Males 15 years and over 

Never married 

Now married, except seporoted 

Separated 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Females 15 years and over 

Never married 

Now married, except separoted 

Separated 

Widowed 

Divorced 



2 722 


3 129 


3 371 


3 000 


2 704 


2 642 


871 


2 358 


183 


176 


258 


189 


160 


133 


56 


118 


183 


167 


289 


214 


175 


173 


58 


147 


165 


195 


309 


255 


178 


207 


73 


173 


203 


461 


218 


243 


250 


202 


76 


179 


348 


449 


185 


183 


188 


179 


51 


112 


379 


450 


625 


499 


419 


422 


118 


346 


393 


411 


660 


517 


478 


437 


153 


368 


380 


361 


399 


369 


339 


296 


103 


302 


215 


223 


228 


248 


266 


239 


95 


254 


159 


176 


139 


187 


167 


176 


60 


212 


80 


51 


47 


82 


64 


113 


23 


132 


34 


9 


14 


14 


20 


65 


5 


15 


73 


77 


105 


84 


72 


60 


27 


44 


2 156 


2 552 


2 476 


2 292 


2 144 


2 084 


672 


1 890 


2 101 


2 464 


2 377 


2 191 


2 039 


2 009 


636 


1 812 


1 918 


1 954 


2 260 


2 042 


1 900 


1 892 


601 


1 717 


366 


338 


302 


405 


372 


461 


125 


475 


328 


302 


255 


353 


319 


418 


109 


430 


32.5 


27.4 


32.1 


33.4 


34.5 


35.1 


35.3 


37.9 


1 339 


1 614 


1 747 


1 532 


1 382 


1 318 


418 


1 197 


95 


96 


127 


93 


84 


59 


27 


59 


75 


72 


146 


103 


93 


74 


19 


63 


82 


106 


174 


123 


83 


89 


31 


66 


102 


245 


126 


123 


105 


100 


36 


95 


155 


234 


96 


100 


100 


74 


29 


59 


179 


227 


332 


257 


210 


229 


58 


169 


200 


208 


327 


264 


243 


200 


79 


181 


190 


172 


198 


185 


179 


154 


49 


158 


110 


111 


105 


123 


128 


110 


47 


134 


74 


103 


82 


100 


101 


100 


29 


119 


54 


32 


26 


48 


43 


78 


11 


84 


23 


8 


8 


13 


13 


51 


3 


10 


39 


33 


59 


44 


37 


27 


14 


19 


1 069 


1 326 


1 279 


1 190 


1 104 


1 072 


336 


999 


1 043 


1 281 


1 227 


1 140 


1 064 


1 038 


322 


959 


952 


999 


1 159 


1 057 


994 


984 


301 


906 


197 


196 


165 


225 


216 


278 


62 


274 


176 


179 


145 


199 


192 


259 


52 


251 


34.0 


26.8 


31.5 


33.7 


35.7 


36.8 


36.5 


39.5 


1 383 


1 515 


1 624 


1 468 


1 322 


1 324 


453 


1 161 


31.0 


28.0 


32.8 


33.1 


33.3 


33.6 


34.3 


35.9 



2 722 


3 129 


3 371 


3 000 


2 704 


2 642 


871 


2 358 


2 631 


2 654 


3 371 


3 000 


2 614 


2 532 


871 


2 358 


1 036 


1 037 


1 187 


1 096 


968 


942 


310 


924 


744 


745 


968 


884 


763 


751 


253 


704 


292 


292 


219 


212 


205 


191 


57 


220 


214 


240 


185 


190 


181 


174 


52 


209 


621 


566 


848 


745 


630 


635 


216 


598 


754 


815 


1 167 


987 


866 


825 


291 


724 


98 


142 


108 


119 


94 


84 


46 


93 


122 


94 


61 


53 


56 


46 


8 


19 


64 


_ 


_ 


- 


90 


110 


- 


- 


27 


475 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


~ 


2.55 


2.57 


2.84 


2.74 


2.70 


2.69 


2.83 


2.55 


2.99 


3.06 


3.19 


3.09 


3.09 


3.05 


3.21 


3.01 


273 


236 


200 


283 


251 


354 


88 


359 


205 


236 


200 


283 


189 


253 


88 


359 


135 


156 


131 


189 


120 


175 


62 


254 


43 


66 


50 


76 


54 


71 


24 


123 


41 


65 


48 


73 


53 


69 


23 


120 


56 


43 


49 


65 


44 


58 


19 


79 


10 


32 


17 


27 


24 


18 


5 


26 


4 


5 


3 


2 


1 


2 


2 


- 


62 




_ 


- 


62 


iOl 


- 


_ 


6 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 



744 


745 


968 


884 


763 


751 


253 


704 


342 


359 


532 


444 


372 


361 


127 


309 


561 


591 


938 


758 


618 


596 


217 


511 


622 


571 


846 


744 


632 


633 


219 


595 


271 


269 


465 


373 


299 


306 


116 


265 


448 


446 


832 


645 


503 


510 


200 


451 


86 


125 


103 


97 


98 


81 


23 


77 


52 


67 


59 


45 


57 


37 


7 


26 


86 


105 


90 


74 


90 


59 


10 


36 


1 104 


1 251 


1 215 


1 129 


1 069 


1 033 


343 


911 


315 


481 


234 


227 


301 


221 


76 


207 


665 


599 


865 


779 


654 


676 


229 


619 


19 


32 


22 


28 


27 


32 


6 


22 


33 


26 


11 


25 


28 


28 


13 


24 


72 


113 


83 


70 


59 


76 


19 


39 


1 087 


1 340 


1 300 


1 213 


1 122 


1 096 


341 


1 009 


214 


441 


210 


211 


189 


158 


60 


154 


650 


601 


869 


776 


660 


666 


228 


620 


26 


33 


31 


18 


40 


37 


2 


19 


117 


148 


100 


119 


131 


179 


35 


160 


80 


117 


90 


89 


102 


56 


16 


56 



10 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS > 



Table 2. General Characteristics of White Persons: 1990— Con 

(Threshold and complementary threshold are 400 persons. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text) 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 19 



ract 20 


Tract 22.01 


Tract 22.02 


2 670 


1 406 


1 804 


150 


81 


121 


182 


78 


112 


201 


68 


104 


197 


93 


89 


170 


89 


73 


393 


210 


221 


420 


210 


274 


305 


177 


248 


292 


147 


213 


215 


160 


221 


121 


79 


110 


24 


14 


18 


64 


31 


53 


2 090 


1 162 


1 449 


2 011 


1 124 


1 412 


1 909 


1 071 


1 366 


490 


334 


445 


431 


308 


410 


36.1 


39.3 


41.5 


1 361 


732 


961 


78 


37 


58 


71 


36 


50 


95 


33 


49 


101 


36 


35 


77 


39 


39 


205 


107 


119 


212 


107 


139 


155 


85 


132 


151 


81 


113 


114 


103 


138 


79 


57 


76 


23 


11 


13 


31 


16 


27 


1 096 


621 


798 


1 054 


606 


783 


1 002 


584 


760 


282 


209 


276 


249 


199 


260 


37.7 


42.3 


44.3 


1 309 


674 


843 


34.5 


35.4 


39.1 



Tract 23 



Tract 24.' 



Tract 25 



Tract 26 



1 431 

95 

101 

101 

99 

70 

243 

229 

132 

133 

133 

78 

17 

38 

1 108 

1 071 

1 015 

307 

279 

35.2 

733 

38 
46 
43 
46 
29 
136 
107 
61 
77 
81 
57 
12 

20 
595 
577 
551 
195 
179 

37.0 
698 

32.8 



AGE 

All persons 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 years and over 

3 and 4 years 

16 years and over 

18 years and over 

21 years and over 

60 years and over 

62 years and over 

Median 

Female 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 years and over 

3 and 4 years 

16 years and over 

18 years and over 

21 years and over 

60 years and over 

62 years and over 

Median 

Male 

Median age 

HOUSEHOLD TYPE AND RELATIONSHIP 

All persons 

In households 

Householder 

Family householder 

Nonfamily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Child 

Other relatives 

Nonrelatives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 

Persons per household 

Persons per family 

Persons 65 years and over 

In households 

Householder 

Nonfamily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Other relatives 

Nonrelatives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 

FAMILY TYPE BY PRESENCE OF OWN CHILDREN 

Families 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

Married-couple families 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

MARITAL STATUS 

Males 15 years and over 

Never married 

Now married, except separated 

Separated 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Females 15 years and over 

Never married 

Now married, except separated 

Separated 

Widowed 

Divorced 



4 269 

290 
345 
343 
369 
280 
659 
662 
495 
353 
315 
141 
17 

130 

3 208 

3 059 

2 865 

624 

572 

32.7 

2 175 

153 
153 
155 
177 
144 
336 
326 
259 
178 
177 
102 
15 

70 
1 671 
1 600 

1 514 
372 
350 

33.9 

2 094 
31.4 



2 505 

155 
190 
208 
186 
193 
363 
403 
313 
226 
181 
73 
14 

64 

1 917 

1 840 

1 720 

369 

321 

33.9 

1 290 

70 
97 
108 
103 
94 
180 
197 
155 
111 
114 
49 
12 

33 
997 
952 
888 
228 
206 
34.7 
1 215 
32.8 



2 605 

158 
171 
221 
206 
178 
353 
378 
278 
285 
227 
125 
25 

70 

2 023 

1 940 

1 807 

501 

453 

35.4 

1 346 

87 
94 
91 
109 
87 
178 
189 
141 
135 
137 
83 
15 

43 

1 052 

1 012 

942 

295 

272 

36.5 

1 259 

34.5 



1 789 

111 
126 
154 
141 
104 
272 
282 
225 
141 
142 
83 
8 

46 

1 372 

1 311 

1 238 

302 

268 

34.5 

894 

51 
59 
62 
74 
51 
133 
144 
101 
73 
85 
54 
7 

28 
710 
681 
636 
185 
164 

36.2 
895 

32.1 



4 269 


2 670 


1 406 


1 804 


2 505 


2 605 


1 789 


1 431 


4 268 


2 617 


1 406 


1 790 


2 505 


2 545 


1 789 


1 427 


1 566 


987 


599 


746 


932 


941 


664 


572 


1 216 


772 


408 


540 


730 


717 


531 


417 


350 


215 


191 


206 


202 


224 


133 


155 


314 


195 


168 


191 


190 


206 


123 


142 


988 


633 


325 


449 


615 


589 


458 


333 


1 462 


851 


385 


489 


830 


827 


585 


437 


159 


100 


50 


74 


93 


147 


46 


57 


93 


46 


47 


32 


35 


41 


36 


28 


1 


53 


- 


14 


- 


60 


_ 


4 


2.73 


2.66 


2.35 


2.40 


2.68 


2.71 


2.69 


2.50 


3.15 


3.06 


2.87 


2.87 


3.10 


3.19 


3.05 


2.99 


473 


360 


253 


349 


268 


377 


233 


228 


473 


314 


253 


349 


268 


328 


233 


226 


332 


220 


182 


238 


186 


221 


162 


155 


150 


85 


100 


110 


103 


105 


72 


74 


147 


83 


96 


106 


102 


103 


71 


73 


103 


74 


55 


91 


55 


75 


56 


45 


34 


18 


14 


17 


25 


29 


14 


25 


4 


2 


2 


3 


2 


3 


1 


1 


- 


46 


- 


- 


- 


49 


- 


2 



1 216 


772 


408 


540 


730 


717 


531 


417 


648 


347 


162 


218 


368 


344 


252 


195 


1 111 


606 


263 


359 


623 


595 


446 


339 


990 


636 


322 


448 


615 


590 


459 


334 


525 


293 


133 


185 


313 


282 


221 


158 


919 


519 


223 


311 


541 


484 


387 


273 


178 


96 


72 


79 


78 


91 


49 


68 


98 


37 


23 


29 


34 


47 


24 


33 


153 


64 


31 


42 


48 


86 


45 


59 


1 577 


1 020 


553 


663 


937 


981 


676 


528 


387 


249 


147 


147 


182 


236 


145 


114 


1 015 


658 


331 


464 


643 


625 


469 


350 


45 


18 


10 


10 


19 


25 


11 


15 


24 


32 


18 


13 


26 


30 


8 


9 


106 


63 


47 


29 


67 


65 


43 


40 


1 714 


1 117 


626 


804 


1 015 


1 074 


722 


606 


278 


176 


90 


99 


151 


195 


96 


77 


1 017 


668 


334 


466 


636 


618 


473 


348 


42 


26 


15 


21 


12 


29 


21 


15 


237 


171 


131 


163 


163 


174 


99 


124 


140 


76 


56 


55 


53 


58 


33 


42 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 1 1 



Table 3. General Characteristics of Black Persons: 1990 

[Threshold is 400 persons. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Florence, SC 
MSA 



Florence County 



Total Florence city 



Totals for split tracts/BNA's in Florence County 



Tract 2.01 



Tract 3 



Tract 5 



Tract 7 



Tract 8 



Tract 9 



Tract 10 



AGE 

All persons 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 years and over 

3 and 4 years 

16 years and over 

18 years and over 

21 years and over 

60 years and over 

62 years and over 

Median 

Female 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 years and over 

3 and 4 years 

16 years and over 

18 years and over 

21 years and over 

60 years and over 

62 years and over 

Median 

Male 

Median age 

HOUSEHOLD TYPE AND RELATIONSHIP 

All persons 

In households 

Householder 

Family householder 

Nonfamily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Child 

Other relatives 

Nonrelatives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 

Persons per household 

Persons per family 

Persons 65 years and over 

In households 

Householder 

Nonfamily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Other relatives 

Nonrelatives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 

FAMILY TYPE BY PRESENCE OF OWN CHILDREN 

Families 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

Married-couple families 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

MARITAL STATUS 

Males 15 years and over 

Never married 

Now married, except separated 

Separated 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Females 15 years and over 

Never married 

Now married, except separated 

Separated 

Widowed 

Divorced 



44 276 


44 276 


4 177 


4 177 


4 304 


4 304 


4 523 


4 523 


4 365 


4 365 


3 362 


3 362 


6 796 


6 796 


6 268 


6 268 


3 649 


3 649 


2 837 


2 837 


2 494 


2 494 


1 216 


1 216 


285 


285 


1 679 


1 679 


30 330 


30 330 


28 562 


28 562 


26 177 


26 177 


5 400 


5 400 


4 864 


4 864 


27.2 


27.2 


24 196 


24 196 


2 062 


2 062 


2 184 


2 184 


2 275 


2 275 


2 228 


2 228 


1 882 


1 882 


3 837 


3 837 


3 452 


3 452 


2 055 


2 055 


1 663 


1 663 


1 552 


1 552 


792 


792 


214 


214 


785 


785 


17 218 


17 218 


16 323 


16 323 


15 038 


15 038 


3 393 


3 393 


3 081 


3 081 


29.1 


29.1 


20 080 


20 080 


24.8 


24.8 



10 394 



5 


819 


12 


100 


5 


340 


3 


024 


6 


376 


4 425 


2 


569 


5 


296 



13 597 



5 


662 


5 


796 




912 




582 




645 


17 


675 


6 


440 


5 


827 


1 


738 


2 


639 


1 


031 



10 394 

5 819 

12 100 

5 340 

3 024 

6 376 

4 425 
2 569 

5 296 



13 597 



5 


662 


5 


796 




912 




582 




645 


17 


675 


6 


440 


5 


827 


1 


738 


2 


639 


1 


031 



14 024 

1 



302 
1 166 
1 316 
1 352 

1 096 

2 152 
1 949 
1 236 

947 
931 
449 
128 

502 
9 952 
9 412 
8 643 
1 998 
1 801 
28.6 

7 768 

657 

587 

644 

676 

594 

1 232 

1 093 

731 

575 

583 

302 

94 

245 
5 733 
5 470 

5 074 
1 278 
1 159 

30.9 

6 256 
25.6 



44 276 


44 276 


14 024 


43 329 


43 329 


13 419 


13 399 


13 399 


4 430 


10 394 


10 394 


3 264 


3 005 


3 005 


1 166 


2 645 


2 645 


1 012 


5 338 


5 338 


1 394 


17 804 


17 804 


5 281 


5 545 


5 545 


1 849 


1 243 


1 243 


465 


633 


633 


463 


314 


314 


142 


3.23 


3.23 


303 


3.76 


3.76 


3.61 


3 995 


3 995 


1 508 


3 779 


3 779 


1 383 


2 687 


2 687 


1 013 


1 085 


1 085 


446 


1 024 


1 024 


422 


585 


585 


188 


416 


416 


142 


91 


91 


40 


214 


214 


123 


2 


2 


2 



3 264 

1 712 
3 413 
1 394 

681 
1 359 
1 670 

970 
1 943 



i 360 

2 014 

1 549 
348 
221 
228 

5 880 

2 260 
1 550 

663 

1 010 

397 



443 

61 
49 
36 
28 
43 
118 
54 
26 
15 
12 

1 

24 
291 
282 
262 
22 
14 
25.6 

237 

26 
33 
19 
10 
28 
64 
28 
14 
7 



7 
158 
153 
143 
13 
9 
25.8 
206 
25.5 



443 

443 

150 

110 

40 

35 

66 

176 

33 

18 



2.93 

3.49 

13 

13 
9 
4 
4 
3 
1 



110 

78 
143 
65 
47 
88 
37 
27 
47 



138 

46 

70 

9 

3 

10 

159 

55 
71 

12 
7 
14 



2 404 

186 
222 
236 
279 
136 
285 
483 
244 
190 
110 
29 
4 



1 702 

1 585 

1 448 

225 

187 

30.7 

1 309 

95 

98 

120 

151 

76 

169 

266 

136 

108 

67 

20 

3 

44 
968 
905 
827 
137 
116 
32.6 
1 095 
27.8 



404 

404 
723 
623 

100 



406 

1 012 

206 

57 



3.33 
3.61 
143 

143 
91 
27 
24 
28 
18 
6 



623 

362 
682 
406 
240 
474 
195 
113 
195 



764 

262 

426 

25 

12 

39 

996 

341 

429 

62 

89 

75 



1 074 

114 
123 
80 
137 
177 
171 
154 
51 
37 
22 
7 



44 
743 
718 
560 
50 
39 
21.6 

628 

65 

71 

39 

83 

118 

103 

80 

27 

22 

15 

4 

1 

22 
446 
432 
320 
34 
27 
21.3 
446 
22.2 



1 074 

905 
293 
229 

64 
53 
110 
389 
75 
38 

169 

3.09 

3.51 

30 

30 
24 
10 
9 
3 
2 
1 



229 

157 
307 
111 
75 
151 
97 
69 
136 



304 

147 
116 

15 
4 

22 

453 

245 
123 
40 
23 
22 



4 130 

416 
300 
379 
404 
324 
628 
541 
369 
278 
288 
154 
49 

148 

2 944 

2 787 

2 567 

632 

585 

29.2 

2 310 

195 
164 
194 
194 
197 
340 
310 
214 
164 
189 
111 
38 

62 

1 713 

1 642 

1 521 

426 

399 

30.8 

1 820 

26.5 



4 130 

3 859 
1 307 
916 
391 
347 
349 
1 484 
571 
148 
155 
116 

2.95 
3.62 
491 

486 
370 
188 

181 

56 

49 

11 

3 

2 



916 

469 
956 
348 
158 
326 
497 
288 
587 



1 278 

658 
381 

90 



1 757 

710 
401 
193 
342 
111 



5 646 

490 
456 
583 
628 
434 
700 
797 
578 
421 
356 
168 
35 

177 

3 979 

3 722 

3 383 

756 

670 

28.3 

3 148 

248 
232 
267 
330 
223 
422 
468 
349 
259 
211 
113 
26 

86 

2 327 

2 201 

2 016 

477 

422 

31.6 

2 498 

24.0 



5 646 

5 646 
1 731 

1 368 
363 
325 
626 

2 314 
829 
146 



3.26 
3.76 
559 

559 
392 
148 

140 
83 
68 
16 



1 368 

703 
1 385 
625 
302 
591 
662 
379 
753 



1 716 

755 

681 

155 

68 

57 

2 401 

901 
683 
257 

405 
155 



3 882 

342 
346 
342 
333 
266 
493 
497 
390 
336 
333 
156 
48 

142 

2 782 

2 649 

2 457 

728 

652 

32.0 

2 136 

176 
168 
158 
166 
141 
294 
270 
218 
197 
211 
103 
34 

70 

1 600 

1 526 

1 437 

450 

406 

34.0 

1 746 

27.6 



3 882 

3 735 
1 251 
920 
331 
294 
402 
1 428 
545 
109 
147 



299 
3.59 
537 

431 

322 

140 

130 

63 

33 

13 

106 



920 

428 
893 
402 
187 
395 
465 
230 
480 



1 218 

499 
437 
109 

93 
80 

1 634 
552 

443 
186 
334 

119 



743 

78 

76 

53 

52 

80 

205 

115 

39 

20 

14 

10 

1 

33 
526 
513 
468 
37 
31 
26.4 

338 

37 
36 
23 
18 
33 
93 
44 
23 
13 
10 
8 

16 
238 
234 
220 
26 
23 
27.0 
405 
25.8 



743 

598 

213 

135 

78 

61 

46 

223 

75 

41 

134 

11 

2.83 

3.56 

25 

20 
19 

7 
7 



1 



135 

93 
174 
46 
31 
57 
81 
58 
110 



294 

165 
83 

11 

8 

27 

242 

105 
56 
33 
29 
19 



12 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 3. General Characteristics of Black Persons: 1990— Con 



[Threshold is 400 persons. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, 


see text] 


















Census Tract or Block Numbering 


Totals for split tracts/BNA's in Florence County- 
Con, 




Florence 


city, Florence County 






Remainder of Flore 


nee County 


Area 


















Tract 2.01 






Tract 1 1 


Tract 15.01 


Tract 16.01 


Tract 7 (pt.) 


Tract 8 (pt.) 


Tract 9 (pt.) Tract 10 (pt.) 


Tract 11 (pt.) 


(pt.) 


Tract 3 (pt.) 


AGE 






















All persons 


874 


2 111 


1 264 


2 795 


5 417 


3 258 


743 


874 


416 


2 016 


Under 5 years 


107 


182 


165 


272 


478 


277 


78 


107 


59 


156 


5 to 9 years _ 


100 


220 


157 


189 


440 


281 


76 


100 


49 


191 


10 to 14 years 


81 


248 


135 


246 


561 


286 


53 


81 


36 


193 


15 to 19 years- 


70 


222 


135 


266 


603 


277 


52 


70 


26 


236 


20 to 24 years 


80 


126 


79 


221 


413 


227 


80 


80 


39 


113 


25 to 34 years 


203 


312 


247 


451 


676 


406 


205 


203 


104 


223 


35 to 44 years 


113 


349 


197 


384 


764 


401 


115 


113 


51 


403 


45 to 54 years 


46 


185 


63 


227 


542 


327 


39 


46 


24 


214 


55 to 64 years . . . . 


23 


114 


36 


182 


393 


290 


20 


23 


15 


169 


65 to 74 years . 


36 


83 


30 


201 


347 


305 


14 


36 


12 


93 


75 to 84 years 


14 


64 


14 


113 


165 


134 


10 


14 


- 


21 


85 years and over 


1 


6 


6 


43 


35 


47 


1 


1 


1 


4 


3 and 4 years _ 


47 


88 


62 


91 


175 


118 


33 


47 


24 


73 


16 years and over . 


572 


1 405 


777 


2 031 


3 806 


2 358 


526 


572 


267 


1 431 


18 years and over _ 


543 


1 315 


724 


1 936 


3 558 


2 243 


513 


543 


258 


1 330 


21 years and over 


501 


1 208 


657 


1 776 


3 236 


2 084 


468 


501 


239 


1 215 


60 years and over 


62 


206 


63 


455 


731 


651 


37 


62 


22 


189 


62 years and over 


58 
24.9 


187 
27.0 


60 
22.6 


426 

29.9 


649 
28.1 


586 

32.6 


31 
26.4 


58 
24.9 


14 
24.9 


156 


Median _ 


31.0 


Female _ 


481 


1 146 


707 


1 581 


3 020 


1 804 


338 


481 


216 


1 090 


Under 5 years.- 


58 


85 


85 


130 


240 


137 


37 


58 


24 


77 


5 to 9 years . . 


46 


125 


82 


112 


222 


137 


36 


46 


33 


86 


10 to 14 years - __ 


40 


140 


74 


131 


259 


140 


23 


40 


19 


97 


15 to 19 years 


35 


109 


78 


125 


316 


137 


18 


35 


9 


130 


20 to 24 years 


50 


70 


47 


130 


212 


120 


33 


50 


24 


63 


25 to 34 years 


119 


181 


136 


240 


410 


245 


93 


119 


54 


133 


35 to 44 years . 


63 


188 


119 


220 


445 


219 


44 


63 


26 


214 


45 to 54 years . _ 


28 


92 


39 


135 


330 


185 


23 


28 


12 


124 


55 to 64 years . 


11 


64 


23 


113 


243 


171 


13 


11 


7 


95 


65 to 74 years 


25 


55 


14 


133 


206 


191 


10 


25 


8 


54 


75 to 84 years 


6 


33 


5 


79 


111 


88 


8 


6 


- 


14 


85 years and over . . 


- 


4 


5 


33 


26 


34 


- 


- 


- 


3 


3 and 4 years _ . 


25 


39 


29 


39 


86 


56 


16 


25 


7 


33 


1 6 years and over 


331 


771 


450 


1 177 


2 230 


1 364 


238 


331 


139 


808 


18 years ond over 


313 


724 


422 


1 137 


2 107 


1 303 


234 


313 


134 


751 


21 years and over ._ 


293 


669 


378 


1 054 


1 932 


1 227 


220 


293 


125 


686 


60 years and over 


37 


127 


34 


310 


463 


403 


26 


37 


13 


112 


62 years and over 


36 


115 


31 


292 


411 


365 


23 


36 


9 


95 


Median 


25.9 
393 


27.4 
965 


23.9 
557 


31.7 
1 214 


31.5 
2 397 


34.5 
1 454 


27.0 
405 


25.9 
393 


24.8 
200 


32.9 


Male 


926 


Median age _ 


22.9 


26.4 


21.1 


27.3 


23.8 


28.1 


25.8 


22.9 


25.0 


28.6 


HOUSEHOLD TYPE AND RELATIONSHIP 






















All persons 


874 


2 111 


1 264 


2 795 


5 417 


3 258 


743 


874 


416 


2 016 


In households 


832 


2 111 


1 237 


2 524 


5 417 


3 111 


598 


832 


416 


2 016 


Householder - 


290 


628 


375 


883 


1 661 


1 051 


213 


290 


135 


608 


Family householder _ 


207 


500 


320 


591 


1 310 


767 


135 


207 


103 


518 


Nonfamily householder 


83 


128 


55 


292 


351 


284 


78 


83 


32 


90 


Living alone 


71 


121 


53 


258 


313 


248 


61 


71 


29 


74 


Spouse 


82 


311 


178 


200 


593 


330 


46 


82 


61 


346 


Child , 


342 


916 


587 


963 


2 226 


1 166 


223 


342 


172 


855 


Other relatives 


78 
40 


204 
52 


80 
17 


376 
102 


793 

144 


466 

98 


75 

41 


78 

40 


32 

16 


159 


Nonrelatives 


48 


Institutionalized persons . . 


27 


_ 


27 


155 


_ 


147 


134 


27 


- 


- 


Other persons in group quarters 


15 






116 


_ 


_ 


11 


15 


— 


— 


Persons per household 


2.87 


3.37 


3.31 


2.85 


3.26 


2.96 


283 


2.87 


3.07 


3.32 


Persons per family . 


3.43 


3.87 


3.65 


3.59 


3.76 


3.56 


3.56 


3.43 


3.57 


3.64 


Persons 65 years and over __ 


51 


153 


50 


357 


547 


486 


25 


51 


13 


118 


In households 


42 


153 


35 


352 


547 


380 


20 


42 


13 


118 


Householder 


32 


106 


27 


271 


382 


282 


19 


32 


9 


77 


Nonfamily householder 


10 


41 


11 


149 


145 


126 


7 


10 


4 


25 


Living alone 


10 


39 


11 


144 


137 


116 


7 


10 


4 


23 


Spouse 


8 


22 


3 


37 


83 


53 


- 


8 


3 


23 


Other relatives 


2 


20 
5 


5 


35 
9 


66 
16 


32 
13 


1 


2 


1 


14 


Nonrelotives _- 


4 


Institutionalized persons 


9 


_ 


15 


3 


- 


106 


5 


9 


- 


- 


Other persons in group quarters - 








2 




_ 


_ 


_ 


— 


— 


FAMILY TYPE BY PRESENCE OF OWN CHILDREN 






















Families _ . 


207 


500 


320 


591 


1 310 


767 


135 


207 


103 


518 


With own children under 18 years 


136 


306 


246 


295 


681 


351 


93 


136 


75 


305 


Number of own children under 18 years 


276 


660 


483 


614 


1 346 


726 


174 


276 


140 


571 


Married-couple families 


83 


312 


179 


199 


592 


330 


46 


83 


61 


346 


With own children under 18 years 


44 


201 


138 


85 


290 


149 


31 


44 


45 


206 


Number of own children under 18 years . 


92 


438 


278 


180 


569 


311 


57 


92 


86 


402 


Female householder, no husband present 


no 


150 


131 


350 


640 


391 


81 


110 


34 


157 


With own children under 18 years 


84 


94 


104 


200 


369 


193 


58 


84 


26 


94 


Number of own children under 18 years 


169 


205 


192 


411 


736 


401 


110 


169 


46 


162 


MARITAL STATUS 






















Males 15 years and over 


249 


665 


341 


880 


1 639 


1 024 


294 


249 


132 


646 


Never married.- 


108 


232 


117 


487 


723 


425 


165 


108 


45 


214 


Now married, except separated 


92 


335 


190 


222 


645 


360 


83 


92 


66 


366 


Separated.. 


17 


41 


12 


64 


153 


96 


11 


17 


9 


23 


Widowed 


13 
19 


29 
28 


9 

13 


48 
59 


67 
51 


84 
59 


8 
27 


13 
19 


3 
9 


11 


Divorced ._ 


32 


Females 15 years and over 


337 


796 


466 


1 208 


2 299 


1 390 


242 


337 


140 


830 


Never married . 


151 


265 


165 


518 


868 


468 


105 


151 


47 


283 


Now married, except separated - 


93 


327 


187 


235 


647 


366 


56 


93 


66 


367 


Separated- .. 


42 


56 


45 


145 


248 


159 


33 


42 


11 


45 


Widowed 


25 


96 


30 


241 


391 


297 


29 


25 


7 


71 


Divorced 


26 


52 


39 


69 


145 


100 


19 


26 


9 


64 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 13 



Table 3. General Characteristics of Black Persons: 1990— Con. 



[Threshold is 400 persons. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 4 



Tract 5 (pt.) 



Tract 7 (pt.) 



Tract 9 (pt. 



Tract 15.01 

(pt.) Tract 15.02 



Tract 16.01 

(pt.) 



Tract 16.02 



Tract 17 



AGE 

All persons 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 years and over 

3 and 4 years 

16 years and over 

18 years and over 

21 years and over 

60 years and over 

62 years and over 

Median 

Female 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 yeors 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 yeors 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 yeors 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 yeors 

85 years and over 

3 and 4 years 

16 years and over 

18 years and over 

21 years and over 

60 years and over 

62 years and over 

Median 

Male 

Median age 

HOUSEHOLD TYPE AND RELATIONSHIP 

All persons 

In households 

Householder 

Family householder 

Nonfamily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Child 

Other relatives 

Nonrelatives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 

Persons per household 

Persons per family 

Persons 65 years and over 

In households 

Householder 

Nonfamily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Other relatives 

Nonrelatives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 

FAMILY TYPE BY PRESENCE OF OWN CHILDREN 

Families 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

Married-couple families 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

MARITAL STATUS 

Males 15 years and over 

Never married 

Now married, except separated 

Separated 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Females 15 years and over 

Never married 

Now married, except separated 

Separated 

Widowed 

Divorced 



1 316 


1 074 


1 335 


624 


2 111 


1 421 


1 187 


1 249 


1 064 


161 


114 


144 


65 


182 


117 


149 


97 


72 


132 


123 


111 


65 


220 


148 


146 


116 


102 


122 


80 


133 


56 


248 


154 


124 


100 


98 


124 


137 


138 


56 


222 


129 


126 


121 


99 


136 


177 


103 


39 


126 


111 


74 


94 


58 


229 


171 


177 


87 


312 


188 


236 


173 


140 


202 


154 


157 


96 


349 


201 


189 


199 


161 


80 


51 


142 


63 


185 


151 


60 


105 


104 


49 


37 


96 


46 


114 


80 


35 


114 


99 


47 


22 


87 


28 


83 


106 


30 


91 


86 


23 


7 


41 


22 


64 


29 


12 


34 


43 


11 


1 


6 


1 


6 


7 


6 


5 


2 


63 


44 


57 


24 


88 


60 


54 


39 


28 


881 


743 


913 


424 


1 405 


976 


739 


908 


768 


819 


718 


851 


406 


1 315 


923 


691 


855 


729 


754 


560 


791 


373 


1 208 


850 


628 


792 


684 


109 


50 


177 


77 


206 


179 


60 


186 


182 


103 


39 


159 


66 


187 


169 


58 


164 


164 


24.2 


21.6 


27.3 


28.3 


27.0 


27.5 


23.3 


31.1 


32.8 


703 


628 


729 


332 


1 146 


757 


652 


646 


571 


80 


65 


65 


39 


85 


54 


74 


51 


39 


76 


71 


52 


31 


125 


68 


80 


58 


49 


56 


39 


63 


18 


140 


83 


65 


58 


48 


57 


83 


69 


29 


109 


80 


72 


57 


56 


83 


118 


67 


21 


70 


59 


42 


48 


34 


126 


103 


100 


49 


181 


98 


125 


92 


75 


106 


80 


90 


51 


188 


116 


112 


103 


80 


36 


27 


79 


33 


92 


74 


37 


50 


59 


25 


22 


51 


26 


64 


44 


22 


61 


53 


32 


15 


56 


20 


55 


61 


14 


48 


56 


16 


4 


32 


15 


33 


15 


4 


16 


21 


10 


1 


5 


- 


4 


5 


5 


4 


1 


27 


22 


23 


14 


39 


27 


23 


24 


13 


482 


446 


536 


236 


771 


537 


418 


470 


421 


454 


432 


505 


223 


724 


503 


392 


445 


402 


420 


320 


467 


210 


669 


459 


352 


411 


374 


72 


34 


116 


47 


127 


101 


32 


100 


105 


70 


27 


107 


41 


115 


95 


30 


88 


99 


25.0 


21.3 


29.0 


30.0 


27.4 


29.5 


24.3 


31.6 


33.1 


613 


446 


606 


292 


965 


664 


535 


603 


493 


22.7 


22.2 


23.7 


260 


26,4 


26.5 


22.4 


30.6 


32.1 



1 316 


1 074 


1 335 


624 


2 111 


1 421 


1 187 


1 249 


1 064 


1 292 


905 


1 335 


624 


2 111 


1 421 


1 160 


1 229 


1 064 


402 


293 


424 


200 


628 


410 


349 


365 


346 


306 


229 


325 


153 


500 


330 


296 


304 


265 


96 


64 


99 


47 


128 


80 


53 


61 


81 


71 


53 


89 


46 


121 


71 


52 


53 


77 


188 


110 


149 


72 


311 


216 


176 


214 


180 


543 


389 


521 


262 


916 


594 


543 


495 


401 


104 


75 


195 


79 


204 


151 


78 


124 


117 


55 


38 


46 


11 


52 


50 


14 


31 


20 


24 




_ 


_ 


- 


- 


27 


20 


- 


- 


169 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 20 


3.09 


3.15 


3.13 


3.37 


3.46 


3.33 


3.37 


3.07 


3.71 


3.51 


3.66 


3.71 


3.87 


391 


3.70 


3.73 


3.63 


81 


30 


134 


51 


153 


142 


48 


130 


131 


58 


30 


134 


51 


153 


142 


33 


115 


131 


36 


24 


99 


40 


106 


97 


25 


78 


92 


11 


10 


39 


14 


41 


39 


10 


21 


39 


9 


9 


37 


14 


39 


35 


10 


20 


38 


13 


3 


19 


10 


22 


28 


3 


24 


27 


9 


2 


14 


1 


20 


13 


5 


12 


12 


_ 


1 


2 


_ 


5 


4 


— 


1 


- 


23 






- 


- 


- 


15 


15 


- 



306 


229 


325 


153 


500 


330 


296 


304 


265 


207 


157 


174 


77 


306 


183 


226 


148 


129 


431 


307 


342 


167 


660 


391 


445 


303 


265 


191 


111 


149 


72 


312 


216 


177 


215 


179 


131 


75 


73 


38 


201 


127 


137 


111 


87 


267 


151 


146 


84 


438 


276 


276 


224 


175 


98 


97 


147 


74 


150 


90 


109 


75 


71 


65 


69 


88 


37 


94 


45 


85 


32 


37 


139 


136 


176 


79 


205 


96 


156 


73 


78 


410 


304 


398 


194 


665 


450 


335 


457 


357 


172 


147 


171 


74 


232 


163 


113 


155 


110 


195 


116 


159 


77 


335 


229 


188 


229 


193 


21 


15 


26 


13 


41 


21 


12 


30 


20 


5 


4 


20 


9 


29 


22 


9 


19 


18 


17 


22 


22 


21 


28 


15 


13 


24 


16 


491 


453 


549 


244 


796 


552 


433 


479 


435 


183 


245 


192 


84 


265 


191 


143 


141 


125 


199 


123 


166 


77 


327 


233 


184 


227 


193 


40 


40 


48 


27 


56 


29 


40 


25 


30 


43 


23 


101 


37 


96 


77 


29 


62 


66 


26 


22 


42 


19 


52 


22 


37 


24 


21 



14 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 3. General Characteristics of Black Persons: 1990— Con. 

[Threshold is 400 persons. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 






AGE 

All persons 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 years ond over 

3 and 4 years 

16 years and over 

18 years and over 

21 years and over 

60 years ond over 

62 years and over 

Median 

Female 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 years ond over 

3 and 4 years 

16 years and over 

18 years and over 

21 years and over 

60 years and over 

62 years and over 

Median 

Mole 

Median age 

HOUSEHOLD TYPE AND RELATIONSHIP 

All persons 

In households 

Householder 

Family householder 

Nonfamily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Child 

Other relatives 

Nonrelotives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 

Persons per household 

Persons per family 

Persons 65 years and over 

In households 

Householder 

Nonfamily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Other relatives 

Nonrelatives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 

FAMILY TYPE BY PRESENCE OF OWN CHILDREN 

Families 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

Married-couple families 

With own children under 18 yeors 

Number of own children under 18 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

MARITAL STATUS 

Males 15 years and over 

Never married 

Now married, except separated 

Separated 

Widowed 

Oivorced 

Females 15 years and over 

Never married 

Now married, except separated 

Separated 

Widowed 

Divorced 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 18 



Tract 19 



Tract 20 



Tract 22.01 



Tract 22.02 



Tract 23 



Tract 24.' 



1 169 

87 
101 
151 
135 
90 
166 
160 
104 
72 
70 
28 
5 

32 
797 
749 
678 
143 
127 
26.8 

618 

38 
41 
74 
66 
41 
105 
84 
57 
46 
43 
18 
5 

13 
447 
425 
392 
89 
81 
30.9 
551 
21.8 



285 

158 
336 
132 

74 
148 
125 

75 
173 



365 

156 

142 

32 

20 

15 

465 

161 
146 
54 
79 
25 



1 821 

163 

194 
203 
199 
120 
277 
252 
146 
102 
104 
47 
14 

71 

1 212 

1 134 

1 037 

219 

200 

260 

978 

68 
99 
104 
102 
65 
162 
131 
79 
64 
61 
32 
11 

30 
677 
641 
590 
145 
131 

28.2 
843 

23.4 



424 

236 
506 
227 
130 
278 
175 
96 
213 



554 

225 

253 

39 

13 

24 

707 

267 
245 

70 
101 

24 



1 464 

162 

177 

164 

125 

131 

213 

174 

113 

90 

53 

48 

14 

64 
933 
883 
811 
151 
140 
24.3 

759 

84 
91 
85 
56 
62 
115 
89 
61 
50 
28 
27 
11 

35 
487 
463 
432 
87 
79 
25.1 
705 
23.6 



4 396 

417 
496 
539 
392 
308 
669 
548 
334 
281 
240 
146 
26 

165 

2 857 

2 675 

2 486 

557 

504 

25.9 

2 473 

209 
253 
266 
200 
167 
394 
335 
199 
174 
151 
106 
19 

81 
704 
613 
512 
370 
337 
28.8 
1 923 
21.5 



1 
1 

i 5i; 



1 554 

165 

182 

181 

141 

97 

238 

204 

94 

102 

95 

45 

10 

68 
989 
947 
860 
200 
187 
25.8 

877 

71 
90 
88 
79 
70 
148 
108 
55 
68 
62 
30 
8 

26 
608 
581 
533 
131 
120 
28.5 
677 
19.8 



573 

38 
46 
60 
61 
39 
79 
94 
66 
46 
28 
15 
1 

14 
416 
391 
359 
67 
58 
31.2 

298 

21 
22 
31 
28 
18 
44 
48 
39 
24 
17 
6 

7 
218 
211 
194 
34 
30 
32.9 
275 
29.3 



1 250 

145 

134 

138 

136 

91 

226 

144 

87 

68 

50 

28 

3 

67 
809 
755 
681 
104 

98 
24.0 

696 

76 
77 
70 
76 
59 
115 
75 
52 
39 
36 
19 
2 

36 
460 
429 
386 
69 
66 
24.0 
554 
23.8 



318 

185 
446 
190 
126 
308 
110 
52 
119 



462 

203 

205 

25 

20 

9 

499 

164 
203 

44 
70 
18 



1 044 

571 
1 282 
458 
253 
572 
532 
303 
676 



1 199 

506 

505 

90 

44 

54 

1 745 

615 
512 
225 
300 
93 



365 

209 
452 
144 
80 
188 
191 
118 
245 



398 

171 

153 

32 

26 

16 

628 

252 
157 

76 
109 

34 



138 

70 
142 
89 

45 
100 
40 
21 
32 



271 

159 
373 
139 

90 
203 
117 

64 
156 



Tract 25 



1 133 

101 
106 
120 
121 
93 
180 
138 
105 
68 
68 
25 
8 

42 
782 
730 
670 
136 
119 
26.2 

559 

42 
46 
52 
56 
48 
92 
70 
59 
36 
39 
15 
4 

14 
411 
385 
358 
75 
67 
27.7 
574 
24.2 



242 

132 
292 
156 
88 
182 
77 
39 
93 



Tract 26 



2 275 

211 
228 
241 
232 
157 
356 
312 
124 
158 
148 
82 
26 

78 

1 544 

1 432 

1 331 

334 

307 

27.2 

1 292 

106 
113 
143 
108 
92 
199 
186 
68 
92 
101 
62 
22 

37 
912 
855 
807 
229 
212 

30.2 
983 

23.6 



1 169 


1 821 


1 464 


4 396 


1 554 


573 


1 250 


1 133 


2 275 


1 169 


1 821 


1 439 


4 393 


1 553 


573 


1 243 


1 133 


2 254 


369 


512 


374 


1 329 


470 


163 


333 


311 


673 


285 


424 


318 


1 044 


365 


138 


271 


242 


525 


84 


88 


56 


285 


105 


25 


62 


69 


148 


73 


79 


49 


255 


91 


21 


57 


62 


134 


133 


228 


190 


456 


144 


91 


139 


156 


253 


497 


777 


654 


1 805 


659 


238 


538 


461 


934 


148 


265 


197 


692 


229 


72 


202 


175 


337 


22 


39 


24 


111 


51 


9 


31 


30 


57 


_ 


- 


25 


- 


1 


- 


7 


- 


21 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


— 


3.17 


3.55 


3.84 


3.30 


3.31 


3.51 


3.72 


3.65 


3.35 


3.73 


3.98 


4.27 


3.83 


3.83 


3.90 


4.23 


4.28 


3.90 


103 


165 


115 


412 


150 


44 


81 


101 


256 


103 


165 


96 


412 


150 


44 


77 


101 


242 


77 


109 


74 


293 


102 


28 


52 


63 


169 


32 


40 


20 


115 


44 


5 


22 


28 


66 


29 


37 


18 


109 


41 


4 


22 


27 


63 


13 


32 


13 


66 


17 


11 


12 


21 


35 


12 


20 


7 


42 


22 


4 


12 


14 


36 


1 


4 


2 


11 


9 


1 


1 


3 


2 






19 


- 


- 


- 


4 


- 


14 



525 

294 
631 
253 
155 
367 
236 
126 
243 



205 


360 


387 


665 


78 


151 


178 


277 


99 


156 


163 


276 


13 


22 


13 


55 


9 


15 


23 


34 


6 


16 


10 


23 


224 


473 


419 


930 


80 


183 


149 


315 


103 


157 


168 


286 


13 


51 


39 


98 


21 


70 


45 


187 


7 


12 


18 


44 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 15 



Table 4 General Characteristics of American Indian, Eskimo, or Aleut Persons: 1990 

[The above table was omitted because there were no qualifying areas] 



16 FLORENCE, SC MSA CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 5. General Characteristics of Asian or Pacific Islander Persons: 1990 



[The above table was omitted because there were no qualifying areas] 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 17 



Table 6. General Characteristics of Hispanic Origin Persons: 1990 

[Threshold is 400 persons. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



AGE 

All persons _ 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 years and over 

3 and 4 years 

16 years and over 

18 years and over 

21 years and over 

60 years and over 

62 years and over 

Median 



Female . . 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 years and over , 

3 and 4 years 

1 6 years and over 
18 years and over 

21 years and over 
60 years and over 
62 years and over 
Median 

Male .. 
Median age 



HOUSEHOLD TYPE AND RELATIONSHIP 

All persons 

In households 

Householder 

Family householder 

Nonfamily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Child 

Other relatives 

Nonrelatives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 



Persons per household 

Persons per family 

Persons 65 years and over 

In households 

Householder 

Nonfamily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Other relatives 

Nonrelatives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 



Florence, SC 
MSA 



FAMILY TYPE BY PRESENCE OF OWN CHILDREN 



Families 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

Married-couple families 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

Female householder, no husband present . 
With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 



MARITAL STATUS 

Males IS years and over 

Never morried 

Now married, except separated 

Separated 

Widowed 

Divorced 



Females 15 years and over 

Never married 

Now married, except separated 

Separated 

Widowed 

Divorced ___ 



508 

48 
48 
44 
47 
54 
92 



27 

22 

9 

1 

20 
363 
340 
310 
48 
41 
26.0 

234 

23 
21 

16 
18 
16 
41 
37 
26 
19 
13 
3 
1 



Florence County 



508 

48 
48 
44 
47 
54 
92 
68 
48 
27 
22 
9 
1 

20 
363 
340 
310 

48 

41 

26.0 

234 

23 
21 
16 
18 
16 
41 
37 
26 
19 
13 
3 
1 



9 


9 


172 


172 


163 


163 


153 


153 


31 


31 


25 


25 


29.5 


29.5 


274 


274 


23.7 


23.7 



508 


508 


502 


502 


153 


153 


108 


108 


45 


45 


34 


34 


80 


80 


168 


168 


52 


52 


49 


49 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3.01 


3.01 


3.52 


3.52 


32 


32 


32 


32 


18 


18 


8 


8 


7 


7 


7 


7 


6 

1 


6 

1 



108 


108 


65 


65 


134 


134 


70 


70 


44 


44 


85 


85 


28 


28 


17 


17 


44 


44 


194 


194 


87 


87 


90 


90 


4 


4 


4 


4 


9 


9 


174 


174 


40 


40 


82 


82 


13 


13 


23 


23 


16 


16 



18 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 7. General Characteristics of White, Not of Hispanic Origin Persons: 1990 

(Threshold and complementary threshold are 400 persons. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



AGE 

All persons 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 yeors and over 

3 and 4 years 

16 years and over 

18 years ond over 

21 years and over 

60 yeors ond over 

62 years and over 

Median 

Female 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 yeors 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 to 74 years 

75 to 84 years 

85 years and over 

3 and 4 years 

16 years ond over 

18 years and over 

21 years ond over 

60 years and over 

62 years and over 

Median 

Male 

Median age 

HOUSEHOLD TYPE AND RELATIONSHIP 

All persons 

In households 

Householder 

Family householder 

Nonfamily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Child 

Other relatives 

Nonrelatives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 

Persons per household 

Persons per family 

Persons 65 years and over 

In households 

Householder 

Nonfamily householder 

Living alone 

Spouse 

Other relatives 

Nonrelatives 

Institutionalized persons 

Other persons in group quarters 

FAMILY TYPE BY PRESENCE OF OWN CHILDREN 

Families 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

Married-couple families 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

With own children under 18 years 

Number of own children under 18 years 

MARITAL STATUS 

Males 15 years and over 

Never married 

Now married, except separated 

Separated 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Females 15 years and over 

Never married 

Now married, except separated 

Separated 

Widowed 

Divorced 



Florence, SC 




MSA 


Florence County 


69 252 


69 252 


4 125 


4 125 


4 466 


4 466 


4 966 


4 966 


5 106 


5 106 


4 829 


4 829 


10 885 


10 885 


11 363 


11 363 


8 218 


8 218 


6 604 


6 604 


5 450 


5 450 


2 590 


2 590 


650 


650 


1 719 


1 719 


54 712 


54 712 


52 776 


52 776 


49 538 


49 538 


11 856 


11 856 


10 607 


10 607 


35.2 


35.2 


35 834 


35 834 


2 036 


2 036 


2 118 


2 118 


2 398 


2 398 


2 532 


2 532 


2 426 


2 426 


5 565 


5 565 


5 743 


5 743 


4 200 


4 200 


3 431 


3 431 


3 135 


3 135 


1 736 


1 736 


514 


514 


870 


870 


28 818 


28 818 


27 871 


27 871 


26 210 


26 210 


7 054 


7 054 


6 391 


6 391 


36.4 


36.4 


33 418 


33 418 


33.8 


33.8 



69 


252 


67 


510 


26 


582 


19 


604 


6 


978 


6 


084 


16 


331 


20 


647 


2 


372 


1 


578 


1 


023 




719 




2.54 




3.01 


8 


690 


8 079 


5 


551 


2 


527 


2 


464 


1 


914 




545 




69 




602 




9 



19 


604 


9 


101 


15 


300 


16 


362 


7 


536 


12 


898 


2 


496 


1 


234 


1 


887 


26 413 


6 


568 


17 


036 




526 




573 


1 


710 


29 


282 


5 


331 


16 


949 




629 


4 


014 


2 


359 



69 


252 


67 


510 


26 


582 


19 


604 


6 


978 


6 


084 


16 


331 


20 


647 


2 


372 


1 


578 


1 


023 




719 




2.54 




3.01 


8 


690 


8 


079 


5 


551 


2 


527 


2 


464 


1 


914 




545 




69 




602 




9 



19 


604 


9 


101 


15 


300 


16 


362 


7 


536 


12 


898 


2 


496 


1 


234 


1 


887 


26 


413 


6 


568 


17 


036 




526 




573 


1 


710 


29 


282 


5 


331 


16 


949 




629 


4 


014 


2 


359 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 19 



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20 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



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CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 21 



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22 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



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CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 23 






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24 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 9. Occupancy, Utilization, and Financial Characteristics of Housing Units: 1990 



[For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 


Florence, SC 
MSA 


Florence County 






Totals for split tracts/BNA's in 


lorence County 






Area 


Total 


Florence city 


Tract 2 01 


Tract 2.02 


Tract. 3 


Tract 5 


Tract 6 


Tract 7 


Tract 8 


All housing units 


43 209 


43 209 


11 790 


813 


1 430 


1 341 


1 426 


1 247 


1 577 


1 811 


TENURE BY RACE AND HISPANIC ORIGIN OF 
HOUSEHOLDER 
























40 217 

28 346 

70.5 

20 423 

7 853 

29 

39 

2 


40 217 

28 346 

70.5 

20 423 

7 853 

29 

39 

2 


11 074 

6 355 

57.4 

4 350 

1 985 

4 

15 

1 


773 
566 
73.2 

475 
91 


1 362 

827 

60.7 

813 

10 

1 

3 


1 251 

1 016 

81.2 

416 

596 

1 

2 
1 


1 338 
949 
70.9 
785 
162 
1 
1 


1 220 

985 

80.7 

950 

34 

1 


1 415 

643 

45.4 

59 

583 

1 


1 746 


Owner-occupied housing units 

Percent of occupied housing units 

White 

Black 

American Indian, Eskimo, or Aleut 

Asian or Pacific Islander 

Other race 


1 021 
58.5 

11 
1 010 


Hispanic origin (of any race) 

White, not of Hispanic origin 

Renter-occupied housing units 

White 

Black 

American Indian, Eskimo, or Aleut 

Asian or Pacific Islander 

Other race 


73 

20 375 

11 871 

6 242 

5 546 

22 

37 

24 


73 

20 375 

11 871 

6 242 

5 546 

22 

37 

24 


27 

4 330 

4 719 

2 236 

2 445 

8 

23 

7 


475 

207 

146 

59 

2 


4 

810 

535 

448 

76 

3 

4 

4 


3 
416 
235 

108 
127 


1 
784 
389 
255 

131 
3 


950 

235 

215 

18 

2 


1 

59 

772 

43 

724 

4 

1 


5 

11 

725 

2 
721 

1 

1 


Hispanic origin (of any race) 

White, not of Hispanic origin 


80 
6 207 


80 
6 207 


33 
2 222 


2 

144 


7 
445 


108 


3 
252 


3 
214 


3 

43 


7 
2 


VACANCY STATUS 






















Vacant housing units 

For sale only 


2 992 

338 

821 

546 

266 

14 

1 007 

67 


2 992 

338 
821 
546 
266 

14 

1 007 

67 


716 

90 

266 

119 

37 

2 

202 

8 


40 

3 

23 
7 
3 

4 


68 

5 
52 

5 

6 


90 

24 

19 

24 

5 

18 

4 


88 

7 

37 
12 

6 

26 
2 


27 

4 
7 
3 
2 

11 


162 

11 

22 

20 

4 

105 
16 


65 

11 


For rent . 


9 


Rented or sold, not occupied 

For seasonal, recreational, or occasional use 

For migrant workers 


9 
2 


Other vacant. 

Boarded up 


34 

1 


ROOMS 






















1 room 


233 

785 

2 674 

8 357 
11 492 

9 764 
5 059 
4 845 

5.3 
5.5 
5.4 
5.8 
4.4 


233 

785 

2 674 

8 357 
11 492 

9 764 
5 059 
4 845 

5.3 
5.5 
5.4 
5.8 
4.4 


148 
273 

1 045 

2 167 
2 693 
2 484 
1 354 
1 626 

5.3 
5.5 
5.4 
6.2 
4.2 


1 
8 

29 
172 
107 

98 
115 
283 
6.4 
6.5 
6.5 
7.4 
4.2 


3 
14 
53 
414 
277 
305 
203 
161 
5.3 
5.5 
5.4 
6.2 
4.2 


1 

9 
49 
131 
402 
376 
202 
171 
5.7 
5.9 
5.8 
5.9 
5.0 


3 
45 
109 
386 
419 
285 
110 
69 
4.9 
50 
5.0 
5.2 
4.3 


6 
5 

32 
125 
370 
433 
178 

98 
5.7 
5.7 
5.7 
5.8 
5.0 


8 
35 
258 
362 
449 
291 
112 
62 
4.8 
4.8 
4.8 
5.3 
4.2 


9 


2 rooms 


28 


3 rooms 


142 


4 rooms 


311 


5 rooms 

6 rooms 


630 
500 


7 rooms 


117 


8 or more rooms 

Median, all housing units 

Mean, all housing units 

Median, occupied housing units 

Median, owner-occupied housing units 


74 
5.2 
5.2 
5.2 
5.5 


Median, renter-occupied housing units 


4.6 


UNITS IN STRUCTURE 






















1, detached 

1, attached 

2 

3 or 4 

5 to 9 


28 585 

538 

1 421 

1 192 

1 488 

608 

390 

206 

8 377 

404 


28 585 

538 

1 421 

1 192 

1 488 

608 

390 

206 

8 377 

404 


8 182 
253 
700 
701 
778 
471 
295 
206 
90 
114 


537 
5 
28 
40 
51 
29 

120 
3 


869 

1 

83 

54 

238 
32 
36 

111 
6 


1 144 
5 

11 
6 
2 

16 

145 
12 


657 
9 
7 

19 
2 

1 

721 
10 


1 088 

5 

47 

4 

95 
8 


915 
39 
69 

253 
42 
65 

172 
22 


1 398 
47 
96 
46 
136 


10 to 19 


21 


20 to 49 


21 


50 or more 


- 


Mobile home or trailer 

Other 


32 

14 


Occupied housing units 


40 217 


40 217 


11 074 


773 


1 362 


1 251 


1 338 


1 220 


1 415 


1 746 


PERSONS IN UNIT 






















1 person 

2 persons 

4 persons 

5 persons 

6 or more persons 

Median, occupied housing units 

Median, owner-occupied housing units 

Median, renter-occupied housing units 


8 773 

11 942 

7 822 

6 646 

2 994 

2 040 

2.45 

2.52 

2.27 


8 773 

11 942 

7 822 

6 646 

2 994 

2 040 

2.45 

2.52 

2.27 


3 064 

3 447 

1 887 

1 478 

658 

540 

2.22 

2.30 

2.06 


140 
233 
154 
165 
67 
14 
2.59 
2.97 
1.90 


306 
507 
254 
215 
65 
15 
2.24 
2.47 
1.90 


174 
383 
289 
207 
127 
71 
2.74 
2.74 
2.73 


294 
400 
286 
228 
82 
48 
2.44 
2.51 
2.26 


192 
409 
267 
252 
77 
23 
2.53 
2.55 
2.48 


392 
344 
253 
170 
117 
139 
2.42 
2.38 
2.45 


331 
373 
357 
288 
175 
222 
2.97 
2.96 
299 


PERSONS PER ROOM 






















1.00 or less 

1.01 to 1.50 


38 135 

1 494 

588 

.50 


38 135 

1 494 

588 

.50 


10 546 
364 
164 
.46 


753 

16 

4 

.42 


1 349 

12 

1 

.44 


1 191 
49 

11 
.50 


1 261 
59 
18 
.53 


1 209 

10 

1 

.48 


1 272 
97 
46 
.60 


1 554 
141 


1.51 or more 


51 


Mean 


.63 


VALUE 






















Specified owner-occupied housing units 

Less than $20,000 


19 439 

1 167 

3 967 

5 933 

3 911 

1 869 

1 659 

536 

196 

102 

99 

53 900 

65 800 


19 439 

1 167 

3 967 

5 933 

3 911 

1 869 

1 659 

536 

196 

102 

99 

53 900 

65 800 


5 782 

211 

1 087 

1 651 

1 108 

604 

634 

263 

no 

53 

61 

59 000 

75 600 


449 

2 

14 

18 

48 

76 

130 

73 

44 

26 

18 

124 100 

144 200 


722 

7 

49 

198 

230 

96 

100 

31 

7 

1 

3 

68 300 

78 900 


886 

15 

145 

390 

215 

66 

48 

5 

1 

1 

53 000 
58 600 


450 

24 

no 

192 

82 

21 

17 

2 

1 

1 
48 800 
53 500 


862 

3 

83 

406 

281 

80 

8 

1 
56 500 
59 300 


492 

81 

207 

133 

41 

19 

5 

4 

1 

1 

36 200 

41 500 


907 

99 


$20,000 to $39,999 


399 


$40,000 to $59,999 . 


317 


$60,000 to $79,999 


69 


$80,000 to $99,999 


15 


$100,000 to $149,999 


4 


$150,000 to $199,999 


1 


$200,000 to $249,999 


1 


$250,000 to $299,999 


- 


$300,000 or more 

Median (dollars) 

Mean (dollars) 


2 
38 500 
41 000 


CONTRACT RENT 






















Specified renter-occupied housing units 

Median contract rent (dollars) 


11 341 

221 
234 
135 
729 
10 138 
1 068 


11 341 

221 

234 

135 

729 

10 138 

1 068 


4 649 

243 
258 
116 
819 
4 329 
204 


200 

346 

332 

190 
10 


533 

342 
321 

524 
9 


222 

255 

256 

205 
17 


376 

241 
245 
4 
257 
344 
28 


229 

310 
315 
1 
213 
212 
16 


752 

128 

134 

5 

103 

710 

37 


714 

184 


Mean contract rent (dollars) 


175 


With meals included in rent 

Mean contract rent (dollars) 


3 
92 


No meals included in rent 

No cash rent 


651 
60 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 25 



Table 9 Occupancy, Utilization, and Financial Characteristics of Housing Units: 1990 -Con 



[For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



All housing units. 



TENURE BY RACE AND HISPANIC ORIGIN OF 
HOUSEHOLDER 

Occupied housing units 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Percent of occupied housing units 

White 

Black 

American Indian, Eskimo, or Aleut 

Asian or Pacific Islander 

Other race 



Hispanic origin (of any race) 

White, not of Hispanic origin 

Renter-occupied housing units 

White 

Black 

American Indian, Eskimo, or Aleut. 

Asian or Pacific Islander 

Other race 



Hispanic origin (of any race) . 
White, not of Hispanic origin. 



VACANCY STATUS 

Vacant housing units 

For sale only 

For rent 

Rented or sold, not occupied 

For seasonal, recreational, or occasional use. 

For migrant workers 

Other vacant 

Boarded up 



ROOMS 



Totals for split tracts/BNA's in Florence County— Con. 



1 room 

2 rooms 

3 rooms 

4 rooms 

5 rooms 

6 rooms 

7 rooms 

8 or more rooms 

Median, all housing units 

Mean, all housing units 

Median, occupied housing units 

Median, owner-occupied housing units. 
Median, renter-occupied housing units _ 

UNITS IN STRUCTURE 

I, detached 

1, attached 

2 



3 or 4 

5 to 9 

10 to 19 

20 to 49 

50 or more 

Mobile home or trailer 
Other 



Occupied housing units 



PERSONS IN UNIT 

1 person 

2 persons 

3 persons 

4 persons 

5 persons 

6 or more persons 

Median, occupied housing units 

Median, owner-occupied housing units- 
Median, renter-occupied housing units. 

PERSONS PER ROOM 

1.00 or less 

1.01 to 1.50 

1.51 or more 

Mean 



CONTRACT RENT 

Specified renter-occupied housing units. 

Median contract rent (dollars) 

Mean contract rent (dollars) 

With meals included in rent 

Mean contract rent (dollars) 

No meals included in rent 

No cash rent 



Tract 9 



Tract 10 



Tract 1 1 



Tract 12 



Tract 13 



Tract 14 



Tract 15.01 



Tract 16.01 



VALUE 

Specified owner-occupied housing units. 

Less than $20,000 

$20,000 to $39,999 

$40,000 to $59,999 

$60,000 to $79,999 

$80,000 to $99,999 

$100,000 to $149,999 

$150,000 to $199,999 

$200,000 to $249,999 

$250,000 to $299,999 

$300,000 or more 

Median (dollars) 

Mean (dollars) 



1 388 



1 293 

639 

49.4 

33 

606 



33 

654 

9 

645 



95 

2 
24 

31 
6 



1 112 



930 
320 
34.4 
292 
26 
2 



292 

610 

417 

187 

2 

3 

1 

3 
416 



182 

17 

110 

14 

12 



2 352 



2 195 

1 053 

48.0 

1 020 

33 



5 
015 
142 
875 
257 



13 
865 



157 

19 

64 

23 

5 



1 458 



1 398 

1 081 

77.3 

1 070 

8 

1 

2 

2 

1 068 

317 

288 

21 

2 

5 

1 



288 



60 

12 

13 

26 

3 



1 551 



471 

947 

64.4 

925 

13 

3 

5 

1 

3 
923 
524 
427 

84 

12 

1 

1 
427 



80 

7 
45 
9 
4 
2 



1 734 



1 685 

1 374 

81.5 

1 345 

17 

1 

11 

12 

1 333 

311 

268 

43 



3 
266 



1 914 



1 819 

1 556 

85.5 

1 054 

498 

2 

2 

1 

1 054 

263 

133 

130 



49 

14 
7 
3 



133 



95 
19 



20 
7 



1 503 



1 422 
983 
69.1 
791 
192 



4 
788 
439 
255 
183 



3 
253 



Florence city, Florence County 



32 


29 


46 


6 


13 


21 


30 


10 


- 


8 


- 


1 


- 


1 


2 


1 






11 


109 


10 




2 


11 


3 


_ 


- 


31 


105 


60 


17 


17 


11 


15 


21 


2 


122 


201 


234 


31 


80 


50 


84 


50 


1 


407 


198 


536 


139 


398 


138 


391 


292 


43 


407 


156 


553 


264 


340 


235 


475 


504 


28 


269 


154 


499 


260 


340 


379 


464 


380 


1 


88 


93 


251 


265 


190 


346 


245 


162 


1 


53 


96 


209 


482 


184 


564 


237 


94 


- 


4.8 


4.2 


5.1 


6.6 


5.3 


66 


5.5 


5.3 


4.3 


4.9 


4.4 


5.2 


6.8 


5.5 


6.8 


5.6 


5.4 


4.4 


4.8 


4.3 


5.1 


6.6 


5.4 


6.6 


5.5 


5.3 


4.3 


5 4 


6.2 


6.1 


7.2 


6.0 


7.0 


5.7 


5.5 


4.1 


4.2 


3.6 


4.2 


4,7 


4.2 


4.3 


4.4 


4.6 


4.4 


1 106 


469 


1 466 


1 178 


940 


1 471 


1 115 


930 


3 


17 


27 


56 


35 


41 


11 


9 


6 


4 


77 


121 


263 


41 


18 


11 


5 


62 


26 


21 


160 


133 


89 


29 


6 


7 


13 


17 


27 


59 


130 


78 


203 


98 


1 


63 


17 


25 


17 


136 


32 


129 


33 


- 


34 


8 


39 


139 


36 


- 


54 


42 


- 


- 


- 




98 


108 


— 


— 


— 


- 


- 


— 


44 


3 


3 


_ 


124 


56 


763 


392 


_ 


32 


19 


21 


5 


13 


6 


14 


3 


1 


1 293 


930 


2 195 


1 398 


1 471 


1 685 


1 819 


1 422 


74 


300 


453 


893 


353 


372 


309 


306 


267 


27 


312 


250 


752 


546 


540 


581 


486 


398 


35 


260 


106 


272 


236 


275 


329 


375 


317 


9 


189 


64 


188 


177 


178 


348 


365 


283 


3 


111 


39 


52 


74 


79 


83 


178 


103 


- 


121 


18 


38 


12 


27 


35 


109 


54 


- 


2.63 


1.55 


1.77 


2.13 


2.17 


2.42 


2.81 


2.65 


1.79 


2 50 


1.84 


1.84 


2.20 


2.29 


2.50 


2.86 


2.66 


1.50- 


2.76 


1.50- 


1.69 


1.85 


1.92 


1.94 


2.53 


2.62 


1.83 


1 146 


890 


2 150 


1 392 


1 450 


1 673 


1 722 


1 370 


73 


98 


19 


30 


6 


13 


9 


78 


46 


1 


49 


21 


15 


_ 


8 


3 


19 


6 


~ 


.61 


.44 


.39 


.35 


.43 


39 


.53 


.52 


.42 


559 


262 


959 


1 006 


805 


1 259 


870 


657 


2 


82 


5 


8 


_ 


10 


3 


42 


9 


— 


245 


76 


201 


41 


77 


30 


138 


144 


2 


182 


116 


390 


183 


280 


180 


149 


303 


— 


37 


37 


199 


143 


258 


340 


171 


125 


~ 


11 


12 


90 


125 


75 


262 


161 


50 


~ 


2 


9 


56 


209 


58 


323 


152 


21 


- 




2 


11 


143 


20 


93 


38 


4 


— 


_ 


4 


1 


73 


16 


19 


7 


- 


~ 






1 


41 


5 


7 


7 


- 


~~ 




1 


2 


48 


6 


2 


5 


1 


- 


35 900 


47 000 


52 200 


102 700 


62 300 


85 100 


73 200 


49 500 


35 000 


37 400 


55 300 


60 200 


128 500 


73 900 


95 300 


80 300 


55 400 


35 000 


637 


606 


1 128 


315 


521 


306 


255 


437 


65 


161 


270 


283 


334 


345 


375 


200 


270 


368 


165 


372 


276 


351 


338 


313 


207 


252 


359 


2 


106 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 




50 


887 


163 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


200 


- 


604 


485 


1 088 


306 


505 


292 


219 


411 


65 


31 


15 


39 


9 


16 


14 


36 


23 





Tract 2.01 

(pt.) Tract 2.02 (pt.) 



76 



74 

8 

10.8 

4 
4 



4 
66 

54 

11 

1 



1 

6 
3 

1 

1 
4.3 
4.7 
4.3 
4.3 
4.0 



1 

1.80 
1.63 
3.00 



11 

45 



60 000 
60 000 



2 

262 
262 



26 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 9. Occupancy, Utilization, and Financial Characteristics of Housing Units: 1990— Con. 



(For definitions of terms ond meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 


Florence city, Florence County— Con. 


Area 
























Tract 3 (pt.) 


Tract 5 (pt.) 


Tract 6 (pt) 


Tract 7 (pt.) 


Tract 8 (pt.) 


Tract 9 (pt.) 


Tract 10 (pt.) 


Tract 1 1 (pt.) 


Tract 12 (pt.) 


Tract 13 (pt.) 


All housing units 


121 


3 


371 


1 021 


1 736 


1 120 


1 112 


2 352 


1 398 


943 


TENURE BY RACE AND HISPANIC ORIGIN OF 
HOUSEHOLDER 






















Occupied housing units . 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Percent of occupied housing units 


118 

97 

82.2 

3 

94 


3 

3 

100.0 

3 


360 
280 
778 
256 
23 

1 


935 
335 
35.8 
21 
314 


1 673 

958 

57.3 

8 

950 


1 054 
508 
48.2 

508 


930 
320 
34.4 
292 
26 
2 


2 195 

1 053 

48.0 

1 020 

33 


1 342 

1 055 

78.6 

1 044 

8 

1 

2 


887 
551 
62.1 


White 

Black 

American Indian, Eskimo, or Aleut 

Asian or Pacific Islonder . 


538 
10 

2 


Other race 


1 


Hispanic origin (of any race) . 

White, not of Hispanic origin. 

Renter-occupied housing units .. 

White 


3 

21 

21 


3 


256 
80 
66 

14 

66 


1 

21 

600 

28 

569 

2 

1 

3 
28 


5 

8 

715 

2 

711 
1 

1 

7 
2 


546 

3 

543 

1 
3 


292 
610 

417 

187 

2 

3 

1 

3 
416 


5 

1 015 

1 142 

875 

257 

8 
2 

13 

865 


2 

1 042 

287 

264 

16 
2 
4 

1 

1 
264 


3 
536 
336 
262 


Black 

American Indian, Eskimo, or Aleut 

Asian or Pacific Islander 


65 
8 


Other race 


1 


Hispanic origin (of any race) 

White, not of Hispanic origin . 


1 

262 


VACANCY STATUS 






















Vacant housing units 

For sole only 


3 

1 

1 

1 


- 


11 

3 
2 

2 

4 


86 

11 
12 
11 
2 

50 
5 


63 

10 
9 
9 
2 

33 
1 


66 

2 
17 
27 

5 

15 
1 


182 

17 

110 

14 

12 

29 


157 

19 

64 

23 

5 

46 

1 


56 

11 

12 

24 

3 

6 


56 

4 


For rent 


32 


Rented or sold, not occupied 

For seosonal, recreational, or occasional use 

For migrant workers . 


9 
2 
2 


Other vacant 


7 


Boarded up 


- 


ROOMS 






















1 room 

2 rooms . 


1 

3 

9 

44 

40 

15 

9 

5.6 

5.7 

5.6 

5.8 

4.9 


2 
1 

5.3 
5.3 

5.3 
5.3 


1 
2 
8 

28 
135 
125 
52 
20 
5.6 
5.7 
5.6 
5.7 
5.3 


7 

20 

219 

238 

262 

179 

52 

44 

4.6 

4.7 

4.6 

5.5 

4.0 


9 

27 
141 
304 
607 
478 
102 
68 
5.1 
5.1 
5.1 
5.5 
4.6 


10 

26 

112 

319 

319 

221 

75 

38 

4.8 

4.9 

4.8 

5.4 

4.1 


109 
105 
201 

198 
156 
154 
93 
96 
4.2 
4.4 
4.3 
6.2 
3.6 


10 

60 

234 

536 

553 
499 
251 
209 
5.1 
5.2 
5.1 
6.1 
4.2 


15 
28 
121 
252 
249 
257 
476 
6.6 
6.8 
6.7 
7.2 
4.7 


1 
4 


3 rooms 


47 


4 rooms 

5 rooms 

6 rooms 


224 

137 
225 


7 rooms . . 

8 or more rooms 

Median, all housing units 


146 
159 
5.8 


Mean, all housing units 

Median, occupied housing units- 

Median, owner-occupied housing units 

Median, renter-occupied housing units 


5.9 
5.8 
6.6 
4.2 


UNITS IN STRUCTURE 






















1, detached 

1, attached 

2 

3 or 4 

5 to 9 


118 

2 

1 


1 
2 


355 

8 
1 

4 
3 


579 
30 
56 

232 
34 
62 

13 
15 


1 332 

45 
95 
46 
136 
21 
21 

28 

12 


893 
14 
71 
19 
27 
24 
34 

13 
25 


469 
27 

121 

160 
59 
17 

139 

98 

3 

19 


1 466 

56 

263 

133 

130 

136 

36 

108 

3 

21 


1 144 
35 
39 
65 
78 
32 

5 


567 
32 
11 
13 

143 


10 to 19 


112 


20 to 49 


54 


50 or more 


- 


Mobile home or trailer 

Other 


3 
8 


Occupied housing units 


118 


3 


360 


935 


1 673 


1 054 


930 


2 195 


1 342 


887 


PERSONS IN UNIT 






















1 person _ 

2 persons 

4 persons 

5 persons 

6 or more persons 

Median, occupied housing units . 

Median, owner-occupied housing units _ 


7 

34 

31 

19 

17 

10 

3.08 

2.98 

3.43 


2 

1 

2.25 
2.25 


34 

98 

87 

100 

31 

10 

3.05 

3.05 

3.07 


282 
238 
148 
101 
69 
97 
2.28 
2.21 
2.33 


318 
356 
343 
276 
166 
214 
2.97 
2.96 
2.99 


249 
264 
204 
148 
91 
98 
2.57 
2.45 
2.71 


453 

250 

106 

64 

39 

18 

1.55 

1.84 

1.50- 


893 
752 
272 
188 
52 
38 
1.77 
1.84 
1.69 


337 
520 
227 
174 
72 
12 
2.14 
2.21 
1.85 


204 
353 
156 
109 
50 
15 
2.18 
2.32 


Median, renter-occupied housing units 


1.89 


PERSONS PER ROOM 






















1.00 or less . 

1.01 to 1:50 

1.51 or more 


107 

10 

1 

.59 


3 
56 


358 
2 

.54 


830 
73 
32 

.60 


1 487 
136 
50 
.63 


935 
77 
42 

.61 


890 
19 
21 

.44 


2 150 
30 
15 
.39 


1 337 
5 

.34 


881 

5 

1 


Mean 


.41 


VALUE 






















Specified owner-occupied housing units 

Less than $20,000.._ 


94 

3 

21 

54 

11 

3 

2 

45 700 
48 600 


1 
1 

10 000- 
9 000 


264 

8 
125 
93 
34 

4 

59 700 
62 500 


297 

43 

119 

92 

27 

8 

4 

3 

1 
37 900 
43 000 


855 

95 
389 

297 
52 

14 
4 
1 
1 

2 

38 000 
40 500 


458 

54 
207 

156 

30 

10 

1 

36 700 
38 200 


262 

5 

76 

116 

37 

12 

9 

2 

4 

1 
47 000 
55 300 


959 

8 

201 

390 

199 

90 

56 

11 

1 

1 

2 
52 200 
60 200 


981 

39 

172 

137 

122 

208 

142 

73 

41 

47 

105 000 

129 800 


514 


$20,000 to $39,999 


6 


$40,000 to $59,999 


121 


$60,000 to $79,999 


218 


$80,000 to $99,999 


69 


$100,000 to $149,999 


56 


$150,000 to $199,999 


17 


$200,000 to $249,999 


16 


$250,000 to $299,999 


5 


$300,000 or more 

Median (dollars) 

Mean (dollars) _. 


6 
71 500 
87 800 


CONTRACT RENT 




Specified renter-occupied housing units 

Median contract rent (dollars) _ 

Mean contract rent (dollars) 


20 

250 

235 

20 


— 


76 

378 
353 

1 

213 

72 

3 


589 

118 

128 

3 

63 
563 

23 


704 

184 

174 

3 

92 
641 

60 


530 

158 

164 

2 

50 
503 

25 


606 

270 

372 
106 
887 
485 

15 


1 128 

283 

276 

1 

163 

1 088 

39 


285 

351 
355 

277 
8 


333 

360 

367 


With meals included in rent 

Mean contract rent (dollars) 


- 


No meals included in rent 

No cash rent . 


326 

7 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 27 



Table 9. Occupancy, Utilization, and Financial Characteristics of Housing Units: 1990— Con. 



(For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 


Florence 


city, Florence County- 


-Con. 


Remainder of Florence County 


Area 


Tract 14 (pt.) 


Tract 15.01 (pt.) 


Tract 16.01 (pt.) 


Tract 1 


Tract 2.01 (pt.) 


Tract 2.02 (pt.) 


Tract 3 (pt.) 


Tract 4 


All housing units . 

TENURE BY RACE AND HISPANIC ORIGIN OF 
HOUSEHOLDER 


1 420 

1 388 

1 169 

84.2 

1 143 

15 

1 

10 

11 

1 132 

219 

194 

25 

3 
192 

32 

13 
4 

1 
3 

11 

1 

4 
21 
101 
174 
304 
309 
506 
6.8 
7.0 
6.8 
7.2 
4.5 

1 240 
9 
10 
6 
98 
31 
11 

11 
4 

1 388 

222 
508 
281 
283 
67 
27 
2.43 
2.49 
2.07 

1 383 

4 

1 

.38 

1 086 

2 

15 

125 

302 

242 

290 

87 

15 

6 

2 

87 100 

97 700 

217 

393 

374 

203 
14 


- 


105 

104 
9 

8.7 
9 

9 
95 
69 
26 

69 

1 

1 

7 

29 

40 

21 

7 

1 

3.9 
4.0 
39 
5.1 
3.8 

11 

1 

9 

55 
28 

1 
104 

34 

32 

23 

12 

2 

1 

2.06 

2.25 

2.05 

101 
2 
1 

.56 

7 

4 
2 
1 

39 200 
46 800 

94 

83 

125 

84 

10 


1 567 

1 487 

1 198 

80.6 

1 156 

35 

2 

5 

5 

1 151 

289 

266 

22 

1 

2 
265 

80 

20 
23 

17 
5 

15 

1 
9 
21 
245 
316 
392 
270 
313 
6.0 
6.2 
6.0 
6.3 
4.7 

1 203 
40 
77 
33 
57 
3 

146 
8 

1 487 

226 
466 
332 
338 
97 
28 
2.66 
2.80 
2.14 

1 474 

12 

1 

.45 

998 

3 

13 

122 

401 
244 

170 
34 

7 
4 

77 400 
85 800 

283 

374 
383 

272 

11 


737 

699 
558 
79.8 

471 
87 

471 
141 
92 
48 

1 

1 
91 

38 

3 
22 

7 
2 

4 

1 

6 

28 

129 

79 

97 

114 

283 

6.8 

6.8 

6.8 

7.4 

4.2 

534 
1 

2 
23 
34 
21 

120 
2 

699 

113 
198 
145 
162 
67 
14 
2.77 
3.00 
1.95 

680 

15 

4 

.42 

447 

2 

12 

18 

48 

76 

130 

73 

44 

26 

18 

124 500 

144 700 

135 

327 

318 

125 
10 


1 418 

1 351 

818 

60.5 

804 

10 

1 

3 

4 

801 

533 

446 

76 

3 

4 

4 

7 
443 

67 

5 
51 

5 

6 

3 

14 
52 
408 
274 
304 
203 
160 
5.3 
5.5 
5.4 
6.2 
4.2 

865 

1 

83 

54 

237 
32 
36 

104 
6 

1 351 

302 
502 
254 
214 
64 
15 
2.24 
2.49 
1 90 

1 338 

12 

1 
.44 

720 

7 

49 

197 

229 

96 

100 

31 

7 

1 

3 

68 300 

78 900 

531 

342 

321 

522 
9 


1 220 

1 133 

919 

81.1 

413 

502 

1 

2 

1 

3 
413 
214 
108 

106 

108 

87 

24 

18 

23 

5 

17 

4 

1 

8 
46 
122 
358 
336 
187 
162 
5.7 
5.9 
5.8 
6.0 
5.0 

1 026 
5 

11 
6 
2 

16 

143 
11 

1 133 

167 
349 
258 
188 

110 
61 
2.70 
271 
261 

1 084 
39 
10 
.49 

792 

12 

124 

336 

204 

63 

46 

5 

1 

1 

54 000 
59 800 

202 

256 
259 

185 

17 


1 676 

1 446 


Owner-occupied housing units 

Percent of occupied housing units 

White . 


970 

67.1 
741 


Black ... 

American Indian, Eskimo, or Aleut 

Asian or Pacific Islander 


227 

2 


Other race 

Hispanic origin (of any race) 


1 
740 


Renter-occupied housing units 

White 


476 
295 


Black 

American Indian, Eskimo or Aleut 

Asian or Pacific Islander . 


175 
1 
3 


Other race 

Hispanic origin (of any race) 

White, not of Hispanic origin 

VACANCY STATUS 

Vacant housing units 

For sale only 


2 

2 

295 

230 

8 


For rent _. 


76 


Rented or sold, not occupied 

For seasonal, recreational, or occasional use 

For migrant workers 


21 

86 

1 


Other vacont 


38 


Boarded up 

ROOMS 

1 room . 


3 

14 


2 rooms 


105 


3 rooms 


158 


4 rooms . 

5 rooms . 

6 rooms 

7 rooms 

8 or more rooms _ 


451 
442 
287 
128 
91 


Median, all housing units 

Mean, all housing units. . 

Median, occupied housing units 

Median, owner-occupied housing units 

Median, renter-occupied housing units 

UNITS IN STRUCTURE 

1, detached 

1, attached. 

2 

3 or 4 

5 to 9 


4.7 
4.9 
4.9 
5.4 
4.0 

707 
14 
6 
10 

143 


10 to 19 


8 


20 to 49 


23 


50 or more 


- 


Mobile home or trailer 

Other 

Occupied housing units . . 

PERSONS IN UNIT 

1 person 

2 persons 

3 persons. 


756 

9 

1 446 

287 
464 
302 


4 persons 

5 persons 

6 or more persons 

Median, occupied housing units 


223 

114 

56 

2.44 


Median, owner-occupied housing units 

Medion, renter-occupied housing units 

PERSONS PER ROOM 

1.00 or less 

1.01 to 1.50 

1 ,51 or more __ 


2.50 
2.29 

1 367 
61 
18 


Mean .. 

VALUE 

Specified owner-occupied housing units 

Less than $20.000 


.54 

491 

13 


$20,000 to $39,999 


96 


$40,000 to $59,999 


223 


$60,000 to $79,999 


78 


$80,000 to $99,999 


32 


$100,000 to $149.999 


27 


$150,000 to $199,999 


13 


$200,000 to $249,999 


2 


$250,000 to $299,999 


3 


$300,000 or more 

Median (dollars) . 

Mean (dollars) 


4 
49 500 
62 300 


CONTRACT RENT 

Specified renter-occupied housing units 

Median contract rent (dollars) 


463 

252 




247 


With meals included in rent _ 

Mean contract rent (dollars) 


2 
262 


No meals included in rent 

No cash rent 


438 
23 



28 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 9 Occupancy, Utilization, and Financial Characteristics of Housing Units: 1990— Con. 



[For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 5 (pt.) 



Tract 6 (pt.) 



Tract 7 (pt.) 



Tract 8 (pt.) Tract 9 (pt.) 



Tract 10 (pt.: 



Tract 11 (pt.: 



Tract 12 (pt.) 
60 



56 

26 

46.4 

26 



All housing units 

TENURE BY RACE AND HISPANIC ORIGIN OF 
HOUSEHOLDER 

Occupied housing units 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Percent of occupied housing units 

White 

Black 

American Indian. Eskimo, or Aleut 

Asian or Pacific Islander 

Other race 

Hispanic origin (of any race) 

White, not of Hispanic origin 

Renter-occupied housing units 

White 

Black 

American Indian, Eskimo, or Aleut 

Asian or Pacific Islander 

Other race 

Hispanic origin (of any race) 

White, not of Hispanic origin 

VACANCY STATUS 

Vacant housing units 

For sale only 

For rent 

Rented or sold, not occupied 

For seasonal, recreational, or occasional use 

For migrant workers 

Other vacant 

Boarded up 

ROOMS 

1 room 

2 rooms 

3 rooms 

4 rooms 

5 rooms 

6 rooms 

7 rooms 

8 or more rooms 

Median, all housing units 

Mean, all housing units 

Median, occupied housing units 

Median, owner-occupied housing units 

Median, renter-occupied housing units 

UNITS IN STRUCTURE 

1, detached 

1, attached 

2 

3 or 4 

5 to 9 

10 to 19 

20 to 49 

50 or more 

Mobile home or trailer 

Other 

Occupied housing units 

PERSONS IN UNIT 

1 person 

2 persons 

3 persons 

4 persons 

5 persons 

6 or more persons 

Median, occupied housing units 

Median, owner-occupied housing units 

Median, renter-occupied housing units 

PERSONS PER ROOM 

1.00 or less 

1.01 to 1.50 

1.51 or more 

Mean 

VALUE 

Specified owner-occupied housing units.. 

Less than $20,000 

$20,000 to $39,999 

$40,000 to $59,999 

$60,000 to $79,999 

$80,000 to $99,999 

$100,000 to $149,999 

$150,000 to $199,999 

$200,000 to $249,999 

$250,000 to $299,999 

$300,000 or more 

Median (dollars) 

Mean (dollars) 

CONTRACT RENT 

Specified renter-occupied housing units . . 

Median contract rent (dollars) 

Mean contract rent (dollars) 

With meals included in rent 

Mean contract rent (dollars) 

No meals included in rent 

No cash rent 



1 423 



876 



556 



75 



268 



1 335 


860 


480 


73 


239 


946 


705 


308 


63 


131 


70.9 


82.0 


64.2 


86.3 


54.8 


782 


694 


38 


3 


33 


162 

1 
1 


11 


269 

1 


60 


98 


1 
781 


694 


38 


3 


33 


389 


155 


172 


10 


108 


255 


149 


15 


- 


6 


131 


4 


155 


10 


102 


3 


_ 


2 


- 


— 


3 


2 
3 








252 


148 


15 


_ 


6 


88 


16 


76 


2 


29 


7 


1 


- 


1 


- 


37 


5 


10 


- 


7 


12 


3 


9 


- 


4 


6 


- 


2 


- 


1 


26 


7 


55 


1 


17 


2 


- 


11 


- 


7 


3 


5 


1 




1 


45 


3 


15 


1 


5 


109 


24 


39 


1 


10 


386 


97 


124 


7 


88 


417 


235 


187 


23 


88 


284 


308 


112 


22 


48 


110 


126 


60 


15 


13 


69 


78 


18 


6 


15 


4.9 


5.7 


5.0 


5.8 


4.8 


5.0 


5.8 


5.1 


5.9 


5.0 


5.0 


5.7 


5.0 


5.8 


4.8 


5.2 


5.9 


5.2 


5.9 


5.2 


4.3 


4.8 


4.7 


4.9 


4.3 


656 


733 


336 


66 


213 


9 


5 


9 


2 


3 


7 


39 


13 


1 


6 


19 


3 


21 


- 


2 


2 


- 


8 


- 


- 


1 


- 


3 


: 


1 
5 


719 


91 


159 


4 


31 


10 


5 


7 


2 


7 


1 335 


860 


480 


73 


239 


294 


158 


110 


13 


51 


398 


311 


106 


17 


48 


286 


180 


105 


14 


56 


228 


152 


69 


12 


41 


81 


46 


48 


9 


20 


48 


13 


42 


8 


23 


2.44 


2.37 


2.73 


2.96 


2.87 


2.51 


2.39 


2.63 


3.00 


2.77 


2.26 


2.31 


2.86 


2.50 


2.98 


1 258 


851 


442 


67 


211 


59 


8 


24 


5 


21 


18 


1 


14 


1 


7 


.53 


.45 


59 


.55 


.62 


449 


598 


195 


52 


101 


23 


3 


38 


4 


28 


110 


75 


88 


10 


38 


192 


281 


41 


20 


26 


82 


188 


14 


17 


7 


21 


46 


11 


1 


1 


17 
2 
1 


4 


1 
1 


- 


1 


1 
48 900 


1 

55 600 


1 
34 000 


48 600 


31 100 


53 600 


57 900 


39 200 


49 500 


34 300 


376 


153 


163 


10 


107 


241 


290 


160 


263 


176 


245 


295 


156 


222 


169 


4 


- 


2 


- 


- 


257 


- 


163 


- 


- 


344 


140 


147 


10 


101 


28 


13 


14 


- 


6 



26 

30 

24 

5 



24 



2 
3 
18 

12 
11 
8 
6 
5,1 
5.4 
5.1 
6.3 
4.2 



34 



2 
24 



56 



16 
26 
9 
3 
2 

1.96 
2.00 
1.90 



55 
1 

.39 



25 

2 

11 
6 
3 

1 
1 



58 800 
78 100 



30 

295 

311 



29 

1 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 29 



Table 9. Occupancy, Utilization, and Financial Characteristics of Housing Units: 1990— Con. 



[For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text) 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 13 (pt.) 



Tract 14 (pt.) Tract 15.01 (pt.) 



Tract 15.02 Tract 16.01 (pt.) 



Tract 16.02 



Tract 17 



Tract 18 



All housing units 

TENURE BY RACE AND HISPANIC ORIGIN OF 
HOUSEHOLDER 

Occupied housing units 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Percent of occupied housing units 

White 

Black 

American Indian, Eskimo, or Aleut 

Asian or Pacific Islander 

Other race 

Hispanic origin (of any race) 

White, not of Hispanic origin 

Renter-occupied housing units 

White 

Black 

American Indian, Eskimo, or Aleut 

Asian or Pacific Islander 

Other race 

Hispanic origin (of any race) 

White, not of Hispanic origin 

VACANCY STATUS 

Vacant housing units 

For sale only 

For rent 

Rented or sold, not occupied 

For seasonal, recreational, or occasional use 

For migrant workers 

Other vacant 

Boarded up 

ROOMS 

1 room 

2 rooms 

3 rooms 

4 rooms 

5 rooms 

6 rooms 

7 rooms 

8 or more rooms 

Median, all housing units 

Mean, all housing units 

Median, occupied housing units 

Median, owner-occupied housing units 

Median, renter-occupied housing units 

UNITS IN STRUCTURE 

1, detached 

1, attached 

2 

3 or 4 

5 to 9 

10 to 19 

20 to 49 

50 or more 

Mobile home or trailer 

Other 

Occupied housing units 

PERSONS IN UNIT 

1 person 

2 persons 

3 persons 

4 persons 

5 persons 

6 or more persons 

Median, occupied housing units 

Median, owner-occupied housing units 

Median, renter-occupied housing units 

PERSONS PER ROOM 

1.00 or less 

1.01 to 1.50 

1.51 or more 

Mean 

VALUE 

Specified owner-occupied housing units... 

Less than $20,000 

$20,000 to $39,999 

$40,000 to $59,999 

$60,000 to $79,999 

$80,000 to $99,999 

$100,000 to $149,999 

$150,000 to $199,999 

$200,000 to $249.999 

$250,000 to $299,999 

$300,000 or more 

Median (dollars) 

Mean (dollars) 

CONTRACT RENT 

Specified renter-occupied housing units... 

Median contract rent (dollars) 

Meon contract rent (dollars) 

With meals included in rent 

Mean contract rent (dollars) 

No meals included in rent 

No cash rent 



608 



314 



1 914 



1 598 



1 398 



1 401 



713 



1 406 



584 


297 


1 819 


1 508 


1 318 


1 310 


657 


1 301 


396 


205 


1 556 


1 271 


974 


1 098 


533 


995 


67.8 


69.0 


85.5 


84.3 


73.9 


83.8 


81.1 


76.5 


387 


202 


1 054 


935 


782 


799 


267 


780 


3 


2 


498 


334 


192 


296 


265 


210 


3 


_ 


2 


2 


- 


2 


1 


3 


3 


1 


2 


- 


- 


1 


- 


2 




1 


1 




4 


3 


2 


2 


387 


201 


1 054 


935 


779 


798 


266 


779 


188 


92 


263 


237 


344 


212 


124 


306 


165 


74 


133 


161 


186 


143 


43 


144 


19 


18 


130 


76 


157 


69 


81 


159 

1 


4 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


2 










3 




1 


4 


165 


74 


133 


161 


184 


143 


42 


143 


24 


17 


95 


90 


80 


91 


56 


105 


3 


1 


19 


14 


26 


10 


7 


11 


13 


3 


19 


19 


28 


13 


13 


14 


_ 


2 


20 


29 


11 


19 


7 


15 


2 


1 


7 


9 


5 


9 


2 


6 

4 

55 

1 


6 

1 


10 
2 


30 

1 


19 

1 


10 


40 


27 


1 


10 


3 


2 




1 


1 


7 


13 


7 


15 


14 


14 


8 


13 


13 


33 


29 


84 


73 


21 


59 


43 


77 


174 


37 


391 


306 


252 


273 


117 


257 


203 


61 


475 


446 


483 


431 


197 


417 


115 


75 


464 


379 


373 


341 


193 


343 


44 


37 


245 


192 


161 


169 


83 


159 


25 


58 


237 


186 


94 


119 


66 


133 


4.9 


5.7 


5.5 


5.4 


5.4 


5.3 


5.4 


5.3 


5.0 


5.7 


5.6 


56 


5.5 


5.5 


5.5 


5.5 


4.9 


5.7 


5.5 


5.4 


5.4 


5.4 


5.5 


5.4 


5.2 


6.3 


5.7 


5.6 


55 


5.4 


5.6 


5.5 


4.2 


3.8 


4.4 


4.9 


4.9 


5.0 


5.2 


5.0 


373 


231 


1 115 


966 


919 


929 


417 


975 


9 


2 


9 


12 


5 


3 


3 


19 


7 


1 


5 


2 


62 


1 


2 


29 


16 


_ 


7 


5 


4 


1 


- 


6 


60 


_ 


1 


_ 


8 


3 


2 


26 


17 


2 


- 


1 


6 


- 


1 


2 


- 


31 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


— 


— 


121 


45 


763 


599 


391 


457 


281 


328 


5 


2 


14 


13 


3 


7 


7 


21 


584 


297 


1 819 


1 508 


1 318 


1 310 


657 


1 301 


168 


87 


306 


261 


233 


227 


129 


282 


187 


73 


486 


443 


366 


386 


166 


401 


119 


48 


375 


326 


294 


285 


153 


243 


69 


65 


365 


265 


271 


249 


99 


233 


29 


16 


178 


119 


101 


103 


65 


85 


12 


8 


109 


94 


53 


60 


45 


57 


2.16 


2.34 


2.81 


2.65 


2.70 


2.65 


2.72 


2.42 


2.24 


2.65 


286 


2.66 


2.66 


2.65 


2.75 


2.35 


1.99 


1.50- 


2.53 


2.57 


2.82 


2.59 


2.55 


2.75 


569 


290 


1 722 


1 425 


1 269 


1 257 


620 


1 248 


8 


5 


78 


66 


44 


43 


29 


42 


7 


2 


19 


17 


5 


10 


8 


11 


.48 


.45 


.53 


.52 


.52 


.52 


.53 


.49 


291 


173 


870 


628 


650 


520 


228 


567 


10 


1 


42 


45 


9 


43 


28 


79 


71 


15 


138 


137 


140 


144 


55 


168 


159 


55 


149 


181 


301 


158 


74 


181 


40 


38 


171 


126 


124 


107 


35 


84 


6 


20 


161 


65 


50 


41 


22 


33 


2 


33 


152 


65 


21 


21 


9 


19 


3 


6 


38 


6 


4 


5 


3 


2 


- 


4 


7 


1 


- 


1 


2 


- 


- 


1 


7 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


47 100 


67 500 


5 
73 200 


53 800 


49 600 


48 900 


46 600 


43 400 


49 200 


80 300 


80 300 


60 900 


55 500 


52 600 


53 200 


47 300 


188 


89 


255 


210 


343 


172 


108 


269 


302 


145 


200 


188 


290 


177 


135 


131 


286 


175 


207 


203 


285 


183 


148 


144 


_ 


, _ 


_ 


_ 


3 


— 


2 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


200 


_ 


132 


- 


179 


89 


219 


176 


327 


151 


61 


178 


9 


_ 


36 


34 


13 


21 


45 


91 



30 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 9. Occupancy, Utilization, and Financial Characteristics of Housing Units: 1990— Con. 



[For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



All housing units 

TENURE BY RACE AND HISPANIC ORIGIN OF 
HOUSEHOLDER 

Occupied housing units 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Percent of occupied housing units 

White 

Black 

American Indian, Eskimo, or Aleut 

Asian or Pacific Islander 

Other race 

Hispanic origin (of any race) 

White, not of Hispanic origin 

Renter-occupied housing units 

White 

Black 

American Indian, Eskimo, or Aleut 

Asian or Pacific Islander 

Other race 

Hispanic origin (of any race) 

White, not of Hispanic origin 

VACANCY STATUS 

Vacant housing units 

For sale only 

For rent 

Rented or sold, not occupied 

For seasonal, recreational, or occasional use 

For migrant workers 

Other vacant 

Boarded up 

ROOMS 

1 room 

2 rooms 

3 rooms 

4 rooms 

5 rooms 

6 rooms 

7 rooms 

8 or more rooms 

Median, all housing units 

Mean, all housing units 

Median, occupied housing units 

Median, owner-occupied housing units 

Median, renter-occupied housing units 

UNITS IN STRUCTURE 

1, detached 

1, attached 

2 

3 or 4 

5 to 9 

10 to 19 

20 to 49 

50 or more 

Mobile home or trailer 

Other 

Occupied housing units 

PERSONS IN UNIT 

1 person 

2 persons 

3 persons 

4 persons 

5 persons 

6 or more persons 

Median, occupied housing units 

Median, owner-occupied housing units 

Median, renter-occupied housing units 

PERSONS PER ROOM 

1.00 or less 

1.01 to 1.50 

1.51 or more 

Mean 

VALUE 

Specified owner-occupied housing units.. 

Less than $20,000 

$20,000 to $39,999 

$40,000 to $59,999 

$60,000 to $79,999 

$80,000 to $99,999 

$100,000 to $149,999 

$150,000 to $199,999 

$200,000 to $249,999 

$250,000 to $299,999 

$300,000 or more... 

Median (dollars) 

Mean (dollars) 

CONTRACT RENT 

Specified renter-occupied housing units.. 

Median contract rent (dollars) 

Mean contract rent (dollars) 

With meals included in rent 

Mean contract rent (dollars) 

No meals included in rent ... 

No cash rent 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 19 



Tract 20 



Tract 22.01 



Tract 22.02 



Tract 23 



Tract 24 98 



Tract 25 



Tract 26 



2 262 



2 082 
1 603 

77.0 
1 249 

354 



4 

1 246 

479 

317 

158 



5 
317 



180 

12 
39 
40 
12 

2 
75 

2 



7 
30 
95 
436 
734 
545 
249 
166 
5.3 
5.4 
5.3 
5.4 



1 414 
24 
31 
39 
32 
3 



695 
24 

2 082 



393 
550 
421 
427 
192 
99 
2.73 
2.76 
2.63 



1 959 
85 
38 
.54 



882 

97 

253 

294 

151 

44 

37 

6 



45 300 
49 100 



429 

141 
160 



329- 

100 



1 483 



1 362 

1 033 

75.8 

809 

223 

1 



2 
807 
329 
178 
151 



3 
176 



121 

9 

25 
41 

5 

41 

1 



6 
27 
99 
290 
460 
323 
158 
120 
5.2 
5.3 
5.2 
5.4 
4.6 



923 
11 
32 

15 

14 

1 



469 
18 

1 362 



245 
401 
269 
238 
109 
100 
2.63 
2.60 
2.73 



1 243 
77 
42 
.56 



44 200 
48 100 



,277 

153 

151 



200 
77 



2 117 



1 932 

1 215 

62.9 

414 

800 

1 



1 

414 

717 

185 

529 

1 

1 

1 

1 
185 



185 

16 

41 

47 

9 

4 

68 

5 



6 
57 
217 
382 
652 
426 
211 
166 
5.1 
5.2 
5.1 
5.5 
4.4 



410 
47 

176 
67 
30 
10 



343 
34 

1 932 



423 
489 
370 
292 
191 
167 
2.65 
2.70 
2.56 



1 728 
128 
76 
.57 



42 600 
48 400 



693 

137 
139 
2 
138 
623 
68 



1 347 



1 220 
885 
72.5 
614 
269 



3 
613 
335 
132 
201 
1 
1 

2 
131 



127 

10 
21 
42 
10 

44 
4 



19 
68 
193 
334 
304 
195 
234 
5.7 
5.9 
5.8 
6.2 
4.7 



10 
39 
112 



73 
17 

1 220 



283 
379 
212 
194 
84 
68 
2.36 
2.33 
2.47 



1 153 
52 
15 
.46 



505 


905 


745 


55 


119 


43 


155 


278 


143 


160 


328 


243 


96 


88 


149 


26 


30 


93 


9 


45 


57 


3 


10 


14 


1 


5 


2 


- 


2 


1 



53 700 
61 600 



321 

116 
137 



291 
30 



1 184 



1 097 
932 
85.0 
799 
131 
2 



3 

798 

165 

133 

32 



1 
132 



87 

12 
10 

12 
10 

43 
1 



2 
12 
44 
234 
369 
295 
127 
101 
5.3 
5.5 
5.3 
5.4 
4.9 



724 
6 
7 
2 
4 



434 
7 

1 097 



211 
323 
226 
211 
82 
44 
2.56 
2.61 
2.34 



1 070 

19 

8 

.51 



433 

67 

140 

121 

74 

16 

14 

1 



41 000 
44 600 



140 

118 

131 



99 

41 



1 359 



1 275 

1 010 

79.2 

793 

216 



1 



4 
789 
265 
148 
117 



145 



84 

19 
24 

10 
9 

22 

1 



5 

18 
49 
280 
432 
292 
162 
121 
5.3 
5.5 
5.3 
5.4 
4.8 



884 
8 
6 



434 
20 

1 275 



263 
336 
244 
216 
129 
87 
2.66 
2.56 
3.13 



1 171 
73 
31 
.54 



476 

60 

157 

142 

74 

24 

14 

4 



1 
42 100 
47 600 



225 

139 

140 

1 

50 
163 

61 



1 059 



976 
768 
78.7 
573 
194 

1 

1 
573 

208 
91 
117 



1 
90 



83 

2 

5 

23 

7 

1 

45 

5 



14 
44 
203 
326 
276 
124 
72 
5.3 
5.4 
5.3 
5.5 
4.8 



703 
6 

1 
1 
3 

1 



334 

10 

976 



185 
279 
186 
173 
71 
82 
2.63 
2.63 
2 62 



895 
53 
28 

.55 



321 

33 
93 
90 
77 
14 
13 
1 



46 100 
49 600 



168 

123 
128 



no 

58 



1 380 



1 246 
875 
70.2 
455 
420 



1 
455 
371 
117 
253 

1 



117 



134 

7 

18 
1.1 

14 



4 
25 
103 
290 
348 
335 
155 
120 
5.3 
5.4 
5.3 
5.7 
4,4 



959 
22 
73 
21 
31 
6 



247 
21 

1 246 



276 
345 
223 
171 
124 
107 
2.51 
2.53 
2.46 



1 143 
71 
32 
.54 



595 

92 

176 

179 

95 

26 

17 

7 

1 

1 

1 

42 000 

47 400 



352 

164 
171 
3 
109 
301 
48 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 31 



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46 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 17. Social Characteristics of Persons: 1990 

[Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Florence, SC 
MSA 



Florence County 



Total Florence city 



Totals for split tracts/BNA's in Florence County 



Tract 2.01 



Tract 2.02 



Tract 3 



Tract 5 



Tract 6 



Tract 7 



Tract 8 



PLACE OF BIRTH 

All persons 

Native 

Foreign born 

LANGUAGE SPOKEN AT HOME AND ABILITY TO 
SPEAK ENGLISH 

Linguistically isolated households 

Persons 5 years and over 

In linguistically isolated households 

Speak a language other than English 

Do not speak English "very well" 

Speak Spanish 

Do not speak English "very well" 

Linguistically isolated 

Speak an Asian or Pacific Island language 

Do not speak English "very well" 

Linguistically isolated 

SCHOOL ENROLLMENT AND TYPE OF SCHOOL 

Persons 3 years and over enrolled in school 
Preprimary school 

Public school 

Elementary or high school 

Public school 

College 

Public college 

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT 

Persons 25 years and over 

Less than 9th grade 

9th to 12th grade, no diploma 

High school graduate (includes equivalency) 

Some college, no degree 

Associate degree 

Bachelor's degree 

Graduate or professional degree 

Percent high school graduate or higher 

Percent bachelor's degree or higher 

FERTILITY 

Children ever born per 1,000 women 15 to 24 years.-. 

Children ever born per 1,000 women 25 to 34 years ... 

Children ever born per 1,000 women 35 to 44 years ... 

RESIDENCE IN 1985 

Persons 5 years and over 

Same house 

Different house in United States 

Central city of this MSA/PMSA 

Remainder of this MSA/PMSA 

Different MSA/PMSA 

Not in an MSA/PMSA 

Abroad 

URBAN, RURAL, AND FARM RESIDENCE 

Urban population 

In housing units on properties of less than 1 acre 

Rural population 

In housing units on properties of less than 1 acre 

On farms 

JOURNEY TO WORK 

Workers 16 years and over 

Car, truck, or van 

Drove alone 

Carpooled 

Public transportation (including taxicab) 

Bus or trolley bus or streetcar or trolley car 

Subway or elevated, railroad, or ferryboat 

Walked 

Other means 

Worked at home 

Persons per car, truck, or von 

Mean travel time to work (minutes) 

Departure time for work: 

5:00 a.m. to 5:59 a.m 

6:00 a.m. to 6:59 a.m 

7:00 a.m. to 7:59 a.m 

8:00 a.m. to 8:59 a.m 

All other times 

Worked in MSA of residence 

Florence city 

Lake City city 

Remainder of Florence County 

Worked outside MSA of residence 

Kingstree town 

Remainder of Williamsburg County 

Darlington city 

Remainder of Darlington County 

Sumter city 

Remainder of Sumter County 

Georgetown County 

Marion County 

Horry County 

Charleston city 

Remainder of Charleston, SC MSA 

Columbia city 

Remainder of Columbia, SC MSA 

Worked elsewhere 



114 344 

113 275 
1 069 



114 344 

113 275 
I 069 



29 813 

29 361 
452 



38 



105 957 


105 957 


27 612 


277 


277 


46 


3 389 


3 389 


1 086 


1 280 


1 280 


366 


1 057 


1 057 


325 


437 


437 


127 


48 


48 


9 


175 


175 


85 


73 


73 


38 


27 


27 


9 


32 153 


32 153 


7 641 


1 839 


1 839 


504 


1 112 


1 112 


306 


23 810 


23 810 


5 523 


22 386 


22 386 


5 104 


6 504 


6 504 


1 614 


5 806 


5 806 


1 416 


70 001 


70 001 


18 958 


11 001 


11 001 


3 115 


13 980 


13 980 


2 739 


21 073 


21 073 


5 072 


9 524 


9 524 


2 809 


4 065 


4 065 


949 


7 165 


7 165 


2 837 


3 193 


3 193 


1 437 


64.3 


64.3 


69.1 


14.8 


14.8 


22.5 


362 


362 


460 


1 491 


1 491 


1 291 


2 048 


2 048 


1 669 


105 957 


105 957 


27 612 


63 535 


63 535 


15 211 


41 941 


41 941 


12 164 


10 115 


10 115 


5 917 


17 419 


17 419 


1 928 


7 617 


7 617 


2 366 


6 790 


6 790 


1 953 


481 


481 


237 


59 855 


59 855 


29 813 


42 491 


42 491 


20 437 


54 489 


54 489 


- 


27 530 


27 530 


- 


3 071 


3 071 


_ 


51 339 


51 339 


12 736 


48 058 


48 058 


11 682 


39 288 


39 288 


9 646 


8 770 


8 770 


2 036 


634 


634 


404 


324 


324 


152 


1 155 


1 155 


334 


696 


696 


190 


796 


796 


126 


1.12 


1.12 


1.11 


18.9 


18.9 


14.7 


2 629 


2 629 


561 


9 286 


9 286 


1 788 


18 438 


18 438 


4 233 


9 035 


9 035 


3 033 


11 155 


11 155 


2 995 


44 668 


44 668 


11 616 


23 185 


23 185 


8 139 


2 829 


2 829 


22 


18 654 


18 654 


3 455 


6 671 


6 671 


1 120 


274 


274 


- 


I 179 


1 179 


28 


632 


632 


219 


1 498 


1 498 


389 


162 


162 


12 


208 


208 


22 


152 


152 


10 


264 


264 


54 


453 


453 


53 


47 


47 


6 


164 


164 


49 


132 


132 


53 


89 


89 


12 


1 417 


1 417 


213 



2 125 

2 060 
65 



1 966 



79 

25 
9 



677 

56 
14 
458 
383 
163 
136 



1 319 

64 
116 
292 
224 

91 
371 
161 

86.4 

40.3 



1 169 
1 630 



1 966 

1 008 
927 
238 
186 
373 
130 
31 



1 107 
943 

1 018 
744 



1 132 

1 106 

994 

112 

4 



7 

15 

1.06 
15.0 

21 
124 
382 
292 
298 

963 
592 
6 
365 
169 



47 
69 



3 376 

3 276 
100 



21 

3 206 

48 
221 

112 
46 
35 
12 
33 



894 

45 
15 
601 
559 
248 
241 



2 224 

162 
278 
603 
454 
227 
400 
100 

80.2 
22.5 



82 

1 010 
1 825 



3 206 

1 643 
1 550 
523 
586 
272 
169 
13 



3 376 
2 325 



1 944 

1 874 

1 757 

117 



6 
27 
37 

1.03 
15.6 

54 
223 
760 
354 
516 

1 732 
1 016 

716 
212 



35 

81 

6 



13 

64 



3 714 

3 684 
30 



7 

3 479 

14 
76 
51 
23 
23 



1 164 

62 
38 
865 
813 
237 
201 



! 269 

145 
501 
691 
332 
177 
249 
174 

71.5 
18.6 



213 

1 560 

2 201 



3 479 

2 347 
1 124 
284 
327 
282 
231 



3 223 

2 594 

491 

106 



1 783 

1 722 

1 453 

269 

15 

9 

23 
16 
7 

1.10 
17.3 

83 
339 
727 
273 

354 

1 548 

946 

4 

598 

235 



38 
76 



2 
12 

5 
2 
6 

94 



4 228 

4 177 
51 



29 

3 938 

41 
195 
85 
26 
12 

6 
15 

5 



1 571 

62 
41 
667 
628 
842 
842 



! 145 

356 
475 
825 
252 
114 
97 
26 

61.3 
5.7 



196 

1 471 

2 207 



3 938 

1 974 
1 945 
401 
587 
498 
459 
19 



2 000 

1 418 

2 228 
768 

65 



2 041 

1 876 

1 584 

292 

6 



109 
17 
33 

1.09 
18.5 

84 
362 
671 
327 
564 

1 874 
1 127 

14 
733 
167 

15 

7 
50 

6 
9 
10 



6 
12 
12 
40 



3 091 

3 049 
42 



2 917 

105 
48 
29 
11 



778 

55 
48 

513 
452 
210 
178 



2 064 

98 

400 
740 
352 
191 
207 
76 

75.9 
13.7 



181 

1 203 

2 202 



2 917 

1 687 
1 230 
258 
433 
391 
148 



3 091 
2 838 



1 736 

1 712 

1 491 

221 



5 
19 

1.08 
17.1 

71 
257 
678 
370 
341 

1 645 

1 021 

25 

599 

91 



4 

22 

6 



14 
30 



4 861 

4 856 
5 



6 

4 396 

6 
116 
38 
72 

17 



1 319 

87 

87 

1 002 

982 

230 

205 



2 766 

1 162 
611 
587 
186 

60 
102 

58 

35.9 
5.8 



872 
1 588 
1 340 



4 396 

2 884 
1 512 
804 
333 
261 
114 



4 861 
2 201 



1 375 

1 049 

600 

449 

110 

40 

108 

83 
25 

1.31 

16.7 

79 
188 
444 
235 
404 

1 307 
999 

308 



5 693 

5 693 



5 213 

134 
51 
73 
37 



1 718 

83 
75 

1 431 

1 402 

204 

186 



3 134 

747 

862 

1 070 

234 

66 
112 

43 

48.7 
4.9 



575 

1 751 

2 091 



5 213 

2 962 

2 238 

1 788 

226 

124 

100 

13 



5 667 

3 885 

26 

18 



2 181 

1 913 

1 439 
474 
167 

27 

75 
7 
19 

1.16 
16.9 

156 
482 
526 
224 
774 

2 038 
1 384 

654 

143 

12 
19 
36 



5 
7 

15 
9 

7 
33 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 47 



Table 17. Social Characteristics of Persons: 1990 -Con. 

[Data bosed on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Totals for split tracts/BNA's in Florence County— Con. 



Tract 9 



Tract 10 



Tract 1 1 



Tract 12 



Tract 13 



Tract 14 



Tract 15.01 



Tract 16.01 



Florence city, Florence County 



Tract 2.01 

(pt.) Tract 2.02 (pt.) 



PLACE OF BIRTH 

All persons 

Native 

Foreign born 

LANGUAGE SPOKEN AT HOME AND ABILITY TO 

SPEAK ENGLISH 
Linguistically isolated households 

Persons 5 years and over 

In linguistically isolated households 

Speak a language other than English 

Do not speak English "very well" 

Speak Spanish 

Do not speak English "very well" 

Linguistically isolated 

Speak an Asian or Pacific Island language 

Do not speak English "very well" 

Linguistically isolated 

SCHOOL ENROLLMENT AND TYPE OF SCHOOL 

Persons 3 years and over enrolled in school 
Preprimary school 

Public school 

Elementory or high school 

Public school 

College 

Public college 

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT 

Persons 25 years and over 

Less than 9th grade 

9th to 12th grade, no diploma 

High school graduate (includes equivalency) 

Some college, no degree 

Associate degree 

Bachelor's degree 

Graduate or professional degree 

Percent high school graduate or higher 

Percent bachelor's degree or higher 

FERTILITY 

Children ever born per 1,000 women 15 to 24 years .. 

Children ever born per 1,000 women 25 to 34 years -- 

Children ever born per 1 ,000 women 35 to 44 years _. 

RESIDENCE IN 1985 

Persons 5 years and over 

Same house 

Different house in United States 

Central city of this MSA/PMSA 

Remainder of this MSA/PMSA 

Different MSA/PMSA 

Not in an MSA/PMSA 

Abrood 

URBAN, RURAL, AND FARM RESIDENCE 

Urban population 

In housing units on properties of less than 1 acre 

Rural population 

In housing units on properties of less than 1 acre 

On farms 

JOURNEY TO WORK 

Workers 16 years and over 

Car, truck, or van 

Drove alone 

Carpooled 

Public transportation (including taxicab) 

Bus or trolley bus or streetcar or trolley car 

Subway or elevated, railroad, or ferryboat 

Walked 

Other means 

Worked at home 

Persons per car, truck, or van 

Mean travel time to work (minutes) 

Departure time for work: 

5:00 a.m. to 5:59 a.m 

6:00 a.m. to 6:59 a.m 

7:00 a.m. to 7:59 a.m 

8:00 a.m. to 8:59 a.m 

All other times 

Worked in MSA of residence 

Florence city 

Lake City city 

Remainder of Florence County 

Worked outside MSA of residence 

Kingstree town 

Remainder of Williamsburg County 

Darlington city 

Remainder of Darlington County 

Sumter city 

Remainder of Sumter County 

Georgetown County 

Marion County 

Horry County 

Charleston city 

Remainder of Charleston, SC MSA 

Columbia city 

Remainder of Columbia, SC MSA 

Worked elsewhere 



4 170 

4 163 
7 



2 084 

2 035 
49 



4 555 

4 469 
86 



3 387 

3 318 
69 



3 531 

3 389 
142 



22 



4 591 

4 455 
136 



5 502 

5 432 
70 



36 



4 177 

4 129 
48 



110 

110 



35 

35 



3 853 


1 923 


4 258 


3 202 


3 318 


4 252 


5 062 


3 805 


no 


35 


6 


16 


9 


- 


34 


9 


44 


16 




- 


92 


134 


119 


182 


309 


218 


186 


82 


_ 




28 


62 


36 


41 


130 


48 


96 


66 


_ 


- 


27 


44 


14 


55 


75 


43 


49 


26 


_ 


- 


12 


14 


- 


20 


29 


23 


28 


26 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


9 


- 


16 


_ 




- 


13 


9 


36 


7 


14 


- 


7 


_ 


_ 


- 


7 


9 


15 


- 


- 


- 


7 


- 


_ 


" 


" 


9 


" 


— 


— 


— 


— 


- 


- 


1 159 


334 


983 


794 


841 


1 246 


1 750 


1 182 


25 


12 


82 


56 


61 


57 


15 


120 


114 


59 


_ 




77 


52 


28 


6 


8 


20 


42 


27 


_ 


_ 


930 


221 


617 


550 


490 


818 


1 311 


930 


20 


6 


926 


221 


556 


464 


454 


643 


1 239 


891 


20 


6 


147 


57 


305 


187 


336 


308 


325 


193 


5 


6 


94 


43 


297 


141 


329 


279 


267 


142 


5 


6 


2 463 


1 459 


3 184 


2 392 


2 442 


3 052 


3 234 


2 452 


62 


23 


771 


162 


279 


26 


218 


121 


260 


262 


_ 


6 


617 


238 


352 


87 


393 


249 


682 


417 


1 


6 


692 


409 


939 


489 


711 


668 


1 166 


859 


_ 


11 


199 


256 


637 


509 


423 


563 


363 


475 


13 




67 


101 


183 


117 


221 


228 


291 


186 


_ 


_ 


81 


201 


529 


710 


293 


829 


340 


210 


48 


_ 


36 


92 


265 


454 


183 


394 


132 


43 


- 


- 


43.6 


72.6 


80.2 


95.3 


75.0 


87.9 


70.9 


72.3 


98.4 


47.8 


4.8 


20.1 


24.9 


48.7 


19.5 


40.1 


14.6 


10.3 


77.4 


- 


552 


439 


246 


31 


495 


184 


158 


360 






1 740 


843 


801 


1 180 


1 153 


1 418 


1 280 


1 459 


_ 


_ 


1 965 


1 243 


1 390 


1 535 


1 643 


1 691 


2 338 


2 015 


- 


2 000 


3 853 


1 923 


4 258 


3 202 


3 318 


4 252 


5 062 


3 805 


no 


35 


2 811 


624 


1 850 


1 885 


2 027 


2 291 


3 054 


2 064 


13 


35 


1 042 


1 286 


2 391 


1 317 


1 197 


1 869 


1 985 


1 733 


97 




498 


453 


1 090 


551 


412 


558 


242 


404 


27 


_ 


265 


285 


404 


201 


299 


230 


1 170 


752 


39 


_ 


121 


258 


492 


252 


207 


668 


391 


201 


18 


_ 


158 


290 


405 


313 


279 


413 


182 


376 


13 


_ 


_ 


13 


17 


— 


94 


92 


23 


8 


- 


- 


4 090 


2 084 


4 555 


3 387 


3 531 


4 232 


989 


2 915 


110 


35 


2 696 


907 


3 014 


2 667 


2 963 


3 724 


928 


2 100 


18 


35 


80 


- 


- 


- 


- 


359 


4 513 


1 262 


_ 


_ 


80 


- 


- 


- 


- 


332 


2 539 


736 


- 


- 














162 


" 


— 


- 


1 381 


762 


2 432 


1 654 


1 992 


2 370 


2 648 


2 053 


103 


5 


1 190 


659 


2 275 


1 592 


1 918 


2 308 


2 541 


1 954 


95 


5 


661 


560 


1 988 


1 492 


1 731 


2 068 


2 139 


1 558 


95 


5 


529 


99 


287 


100 


187 


240 


402 


396 


_ 




92 


16 


67 


6 


- 


- 


14 


- 


_ 


_ 


57 


16 


35 


6 


- 


- 


14 


- 


- 


- 


76 


79 


16 


11 


14 


6 


10 


51 


_ 




23 


8 


47 


13 


7 


11 


28 


8 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


27 


32 


53 


45 


55 


40 


8 


- 


1.35 


1.09 


1.07 


1.03 


1.05 


1.06 


1.10 


1.12 


1.00 


1.00 


14.9 


15.3 


13.1 


12.6 


13.6 


16.1 


20.8 


17.3 


14.4 


30.0 


115 


42 


77 


31 


80 


29 


106 


97 


_ 




222 


131 


371 


154 


183 


293 


481 


419 


_ 


_ 


500 


242 


775 


557 


569 


962 


1 007 


739 


44 


_ 


219 


170 


664 


521 


605 


600 


528 


388 


19 


_ 


325 


177 


518 


359 


502 


441 


471 


370 


32 


5 


1 279 


694 


2 215 


1 430 


1 801 


2 061 


2 304 


1 884 


80 


5 


884 


521 


1 492 


1 113 


1 161 


1 402 


1 217 


1 152 


48 


5 


- 


- 


22 


- 


- 


5 


- 


17 


_ 


_ 


395 


173 


701 


317 


640 


654 


1 087 


715 


32 


_ 


102 


68 


217 


224 


191 


309 


344 


169 


23 


- 


_ 


9 


_ 


_ 


_ 


7 


33 


6 


_ 


_ 


47 


6 


42 


39 


27 


42 


53 


40 


15 


_ 


21 


15 


75 


117 


64 


118 


141 


24 


- 


- 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


6 


— 


5 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


13 


12 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


10 


- 


- 


- 


5 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


18 


5 


34 


10 


34 


_ 


_ 


20 


7 


- 


12 


- 


14 


8 


8 


- 


- 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


6 


5 


- 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


24 


- 


8 


13 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


8 


8 


14 


- 


- 


11 
5 

41 


7 


5 


- 


- 


6 


23 


52 


38 


74 


82 


47 


8 


_ 



48 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 






Table 17. Social Characteristics of Persons: 1990— Con. 

[Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 




Florence city, Florence County— Con. 



Tract 3 (pt.) Tract 5 (pt.) 



Tract 6 (pt.) 


Tract 7 (pt.) 


Tract 8 (pt.) 


Tract 9 (pt.) 


Tract 10 (pt.) 


Tract 11 (pt.) 


Tract 12 (pt.) 


Tract 13 (pt.) 


1 074 

1 062 
12 


3 408 

3 403 
5 


5 443 

5 443 


3 440 

3 433 

7 


2 084 

2 035 
49 


4 555 

4 469 
86 


3 202 

3 161 
41 


2 144 

2 053 
91 



PUCE OF BIRTH 

All persons 

Native 

Foreign born 

LANGUAGE SPOKEN AT HOME AND ABILITY TO 
SPEAK ENGLISH 

Linguistically isolated households 

Persons 5 years and over 

In linguistically isolated households 

Speak a language other thon English 

Do not speak English "very well" 

Speak Spanish 

Do not speak English "very well" 

Linguistically isolated 

Speak an Asian or Pacific Island language 

Do not speak English "very well" 

Linguistically isolated 

SCHOOL ENROLLMENT AND TYPE OF SCHOOL 

Persons 3 years and over enrolled in school 
Preprimary school 

Public school 

Elementary or high school 

Public school 

College 

Public college 

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT 

Persons 25 years and over 

Less than 9th grade 

9th to 12th grade, no diploma 

High school graduate (includes equivalency) 

Some college, no degree 

Associate degree 

Bachelor's degree 

Graduate or professional degree 

Percent high school graduate or higher 

Percent bachelor's degree or higher 

FERTILITY 

Children ever born per 1,000 women 15 to 24 years .. 

Children ever born per 1,000 women 25 to 34 years .. 

Children ever born per 1,000 women 35 to 44 years -- 

RESIDENCE IN 1985 

Persons 5 years and over 

Same house 

Different house in United States 

Central city of this MSA/PMSA 

Remainder of this MSA/PMSA 

Different MSA/PMSA 

Not in an MSA/PMSA 

Abroad 

URBAN, RURAL, AND FARM RESIDENCE 

Urban population 

In housing units on properties of less than 1 acre 

Rural population 

In housing units on properties of less than 1 acre 

On farms 

JOURNEY TO WORK 

Workers 16 years and over 

Car, truck, or van 

Drove alone 

Carpooled 

Public transportation (including taxicab) 

Bus or trolley bus or streetcar or trolley car 

Subway or elevated, railroad, or ferryboat 

Walked 

Other means 

Worked at home 

Persons per car, truck, or van 

Mean travel time to work (minutes) 

Departure time for work: 

5:00 a.m. to 5:59 a.m 

6:00 a.m. to 6:59 a.m 

7:00 a.m. to 7:59 a.m 

8:00 a.m. to 8:59 a.m.. 

All other times 

Worked in MSA of residence 

Florence city 

Lake City city 

Remainder of Florence County 

Worked outside MSA of residence 

Kingstree town 

Remainder of Williamsburg County 

Darlington city 

Remainder of Darlington County 

Sumter city 

Remainder of Sumter County 

Georgetown County 

Marion County 

Horry County 

Charleston city 

Remainder of Charleston, SC MSA 

Columbia city 

Remainder of Columbia, SC MSA 

Worked elsewhere 



372 

372 



356 



173 



135 

128 

30 

12 



206 

11 
13 
70 
35 
33 
44 

88.3 
21.4 



1 077 

2 263 



356 

287 
69 
18 

10 
41 



372 
336 



144 

144 
123 
21 



1.09 
16.3 

23 
33 
51 
17 
20 

131 
62 

69 
13 



962 


3 117 


4 963 


3 181 


1 923 


4 258 


3 034 


2 012 


- 


6 


- 


6 


16 


9 


_ 


_ 


13 


85 


134 


56 


134 


119 


163 


167 


13 


29 


51 


12 


62 


36 


41 


67 


7 


64 


73 


- 


44 


14 


55 


25 


7 


17 


37 


- 


14 


- 


20 


9 


_ 


_ 


6 


_ 


13 


9 


36 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7 


9 


15 


- 




" 


" 


~ 


~ 


9 


_ 


- 


270 


842 


1 659 


943 


334 


983 


743 


551 


20 


28 


83 


57 


56 


61 


57 


15 


13 


28 


75 


52 


52 


28 


6 


8 


200 


647 


1 372 


782 


221 


617 


514 


291 


165 


632 


1 343 


778 


221 


556 


428 


276 


50 


167 


204 


104 


57 


305 


172 


245 


41 


147 


186 


64 


43 


297 


133 


242 


639 


2 038 


2 939 


2 061 


1 459 


3 184 


2 260 


1 462 


17 


997 


728 


705 


162 


279 


26 


88 


30 


424 


798 


471 


238 


352 


50 


141 


233 


346 


999 


565 


409 


939 


464 


436 


161 


119 


208 


151 


256 


637 


480 


263 


42 


47 


66 


63 


101 


183 


103 


137 


107 


63 


112 


75 


201 


529 


699 


229 


49 


42 


28 


31 


92 


265 


438 


168 


92.6 


30.3 


48.1 


42.9 


72.6 


80.2 


96.6 


84.3 


24.4 


5.2 


4.8 


5.1 


20.1 


24.9 


50.3 


27.2 


317 


930 


580 


506 


439 


246 


32 


689 


1 339 


1 445 


1 740 


1 827 


843 


801 


1 118 


1 129 


2 328 


1 115 


2 091 


1 957 


1 243 


1 390 


1 486 


1 861 


962 


3 117 


4 963 


3 181 


1 923 


4 258 


3 034 


2 012 


426 


1 978 


2 799 


2 318 


624 


1 850 


1 805 


1 128 


536 


1 139 


2 151 


863 


1 286 


2 391 


1 229 


790 


143 


640 


1 723 


405 


453 


1 090 


551 


354 


109 


154 


218 


189 


285 


404 


180 


162 


212 


236 


110 


111 


258 


492 


232 


94 


72 


109 


100 


158 


290 


405 


266 


180 


— 


— 


13 


- 


13 


17 


- 


94 


1 074 


3 408 


5 443 


3 440 


2 084 


4 555 


3 202 


2 144 


1 016 


1 402 


3 739 


2 275 


907 


3 014 


2 558 


1 816 



572 


854 


2 036 


1 085 


762 


2 432 


1 572 


1 178 


567 


584 


1 791 


938 


659 


2 275 


1 510 


1 161 


465 


317 


1 336 


509 


560 


1 988 


1 417 


1 071 


102 


267 


455 


429 


99 


287 


93 


90 


- 


87 


160 


68 


16 


67 


6 




- 


35 


27 


33 


16 


35 


6 


- 


_ 


92 


64 


56 


79 


16 


11 


10 


5 


76 


7 


23 


8 


47 


13 




- 


15 


14 


- 


- 


27 


32 


7 


1.11 


1.33 


1.16 


1.36 


1.09 


1.07 


1.03 


1.04 


15.9 


17.0 


16.8 


15.1 


15.3 


13.1 


12.2 


13.5 


27 


37 


149 


115 


42 


77 


31 


37 


88 


75 


434 


190 


131 


371 


146 


95 


297 


279 


504 


364 


242 


775 


539 


326 


118 


176 


215 


155 


170 


664 


483 


467 


42 


272 


720 


261 


177 


518 


341 


246 


549 


810 


1 915 


995 


694 


2 215 


1 378 


1 088 


364 


680 


1 301 


668 


521 


1 492 


1 061 


719 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


22 


_ 


_ 


185 


130 


614 


327 


173 


701 


317 


369 


23 


44 


121 


90 


68 


217 


194 


90 


- 


- 


12 


_ 


9 


_ 


_ 




- 


- 


, 19 


41 


6 


42 


39 


27 


5 
6 


15 


30 


21 


15 


75 


94 


32 


10 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10 


_ 


_ 


- 


12 


5 


- 


- 


_ 


18 


5 


- 


- 


7 


20 


7 


- 


5 


- 


_ 


_ 


15 


_ 


_ 


24 


_ 


3 


6 


- 


9 


8 


8 


14 


- 




— 


— 


7 


— 


— 


— 


_ 


_ 


6 


7 


17 


- 


23 


52 


38 


23 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 49 



Table 17. Social Characteristics of Persons: 1990 -Con. 

[Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Florence city, Florence County— Con. 



Tract 14 (pt.) Tract 15.01 (pt.) Tract 16.01 (pt.) 



Remainder of Florence County 



Tract 1 Tract 2.01 (pt.) Tract 2.02 (pt.) 



Tract 3 (pt.) 



Tract 4 



PLACE OF BIRTH 

All persons 

Native 

Foreign born 

LANGUAGE SPOKEN AT HOME AND ABILITY TO 
SPEAK ENGLISH 

Linguistically isolated households 

Persons 5 yeors and over 

In linguistically isolated households 

Speak a language other than English 

Do not speak English "very well" 

Speak Spanish 

Do not speak English "very well" 

Linguistically isolated 

Speak an Asian or Pacific Island language 

Do not speok English "very well" 

Linguistically isolated 

SCHOOL ENROLLMENT AND TYPE OF SCHOOL 

Persons 3 years and over enrolled in school 
Preprimory school 

Public school 

Elementary or high school 

Public school 

College 

Public college 

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT 

Persons 25 years and over 

Less than 9th grade 

9th to 12th grade, no diploma 

High school graduate (includes equivalency) 

Some college, no degree 

Associate degree 

Bachelor's degree 

Graduate or professional degree 

Percent high school graduate or higher 

Percent bachelor's degree or higher 

FERTILITY 

Children ever born per 1,000 women 15 to 24 years.. 
Children ever born per 1.000 women 25 to 34 years .. 
Children ever born per 1,000 women 35 to 44 years .. 

RESIDENCE IN 1985 

Persons 5 years and over 

Same house 

Different house in United States 

Central city of this MSA/PMSA. 

Remainder of this MSA/PMSA 

Different MSA/PMSA 

Not in an MSA/PMSA 

Abroad 

URBAN, RURAL, AND FARM RESIDENCE 

Urban population 

In housing units on properties of less thon 1 acre 

Rural population 

In housing units on properties of less thon 1 acre 

On farms 

JOURNEY TO WORK 

Workers 16 years and over 

Car, truck, or van 

Drove alone 

Carpooled 

Public transportation (including taxicob) 

Bus or trolley bus or streetcar or trolley car 

Subway or elevated, railroad, or ferryboat 

Walked 

Other means 

Worked at home 

Persons per car, truck, or van 

Mean travel time to work (minutes) 

Departure time for work: 

5:00 a.m. to 5:59 o.m 

6:00 a.m. to 6:59 am 

7:00 a.m. to 7:59 am 

8:00 a.m. to 8:59 a.m 

All other times 

Worked in MSA of residence 

Florence city 

Lake City city 

Remainder of Florence County 

Worked outside MSA of residence 

Kingstree town 

Remainder of Williamsburg County 

Darlington city 

Remainder of Darlington County 

Sumter city 

Remainder of Sumter County 

Georgetown County 

Marion County 

Horry County 

Charleston city 

Remainder of Charleston, SC MSA 

Columbia city 

Remainder of Columbia, SC MSA 

Worked elsewhere 



3 669 

3 540 
129 



3 446 

9 
203 
48 

43 

23 

9 

14 



1 001 

89 
14 
653 
486 
259 
230 



2 501 

63 
197 
560 
468 
168 
721 
324 

89.6 

41.8 



146 
1 291 
1 581 



3 446 

1 814 
1 540 
488 
140 
593 
319 
92 



3 669 
3 249 



1 915 

1 875 

1 690 

185 



6 
11 
23 

1.06 
15.4 

23 
199 
802 
540 
328 

1 678 

1 176 

502 

237 

7 
30 
102 

6 
12 

7 

14 
6 
7 
8 
5 
33 



277 

245 
32 



4 341 

4 291 
50 



2 015 

1 950 
65 



3 341 

3 241 
100 



3 342 

3 312 
30 



4 068 

4 055 
13 



215 


4 031 


1 856 


3 171 


3 123 


3 721 


- 


5 


- 


48 


14 


6 


12 


146 


79 


221 


76 


51 


7 


12 


25 


112 


51 


12 


- 


76 


9 


46 


23 


11 


- 


- 


- 


35 


23 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


12 


_ 


_ 


7 


- 


- 


33 


9 


_ 


7 


- 


: 


8 


9 
9 


- 


105 


1 351 


652 


882 


991 


997 


30 


1)7 


56 


45 


54 


35 


22 


21 


14 


15 


30 


18 


65 


876 


438 


595 


730 


660 


65 


780 


363 


553 


685 


638 


10 


358 


158 


242 


207 


302 


10 


288 


131 


235 


189 


280 


124 


2 787 


1 257 


2 201 


2 063 


2 295 


33 


102 


64 


156 


134 


272 


18 


206 


115 


272 


488 


595 


40 


673 


292 


592 


621 


627 


18 


604 


211 


454 


297 


401 


6 


276 


91 


227 


144 


168 


9 


667 


323 


400 


205 


150 


- 


259 


161 


100 


174 


82 


58.9 


88.9 


85.8 


80.6 


69.8 


62.2 


7.3 


33.2 


38.5 


22.7 


18.4 


10.1 


733 


64 




83 


238 


437 


2 273 


952 


1 218 


1 010 


1 619 


1 490 


1 654 


1 837 


1 819 


1 822 


2 185 


2 281 


215 


4 031 


1 856 


3 171 


3 123 


3 721 


134 


1 726 


995 


1 608 


2 060 


1 667 


73 


2 264 


830 


1 550 


1 055 


2 033 


25 


388 


211 


523 


266 


318 


48 


471 


147 


586 


327 


1 022 


- 


881 


355 


272 


272 


373 


- 


524 


117 


169 


190 


320 


8 


41 


31 


13 


8 


21 


277 


1 978 


997 


3 341 


2 851 


1 616 


72 


1 227 


925 


2 290 


2 258 


1 080 


- 


2 363 


1 018 


- 


491 


2 452 


- 


1 560 


744 


- 


106 


1 354 


_ 


110 


- 


- 


- 


32 


78 


2 477 


1 029 


1 939 


1 639 


1 854 


78 


2 418 


1 011 


1 869 


1 578 


1 737 


70 


2 194 


899 


1 752 


1 330 


1 503 


8 


224 


112 


117 


248 


234 


- 


- 


4 


- 


15 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


9 


- 


_ 


6 


_ 


6 


23 


58 


- 


- 


7 


27 


16 


35 


- 


53 


7 


37 


7 


24 


1.05 


1.05 


1.07 


1.03 


1.10 


1.08 


14.5 


19.7 


15.0 


15.5 


17.3 


18.7 


_ 


69 


21 


54 


60 


169 


26 


364 


124 


223 


306 


298 


10 


1 028 


338 


760 


676 


645 


9 


525 


273 


354 


256 


296 


33 


438 


266 


511 


334 


422 


78 


2 024 


883 


1 727 


1 417 


1 583 


42 


1 310 


544 


1 011 


884 


1 082 


- 


- 


6 


- 


4 


_ 


36 


714 


333 


716 


529 


501 


- 


453 


146 


212 


222 


271 


- 


7 


- 


- 


- 


9 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


20 


- 


40 


32 


35 


38 


29 


- 


203 


69 


81 


76 


106 


- 


25 


- 


6 


- 


_ 


- 


7 


- 


- 


2 
5 


4 


- 


26 


- 


13 


16 
9 
8 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


5 


- 


17 


- 


- 


2 


_ 


- 


7 


- 


13 


6 


7 


- 


121 


45 


64 


88 


63 



50 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 17. Social Characteristics of Persons: 1990— Con. 

[Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 5 <pt.) 



Tract 6 (pt.) 



Tract 7 (pt.) 



Tract 8 (pt,) 



Tract 9 (pt.) 



Tract 10 (pt.: 



Tract 1 1 (pt.) 



Tract 12 (pt.) 



PLACE OF BIRTH 

All persons 

Native 

Foreign born 

LANGUAGE SPOKEN AT HOME AND ABILITY TO 
SPEAK ENGLISH 

Linguistically isolated households 

Persons 5 years and over 

In linguistically isolated households 

Speak o language other than English 

Do not speak English "very well" 

Speak Spanish 

Do not speak English "very well" 

Linguistically isolated 

Speak an Asian or Pacific Island language 

Do not speak English "very well" 

Linguistically isolated 

SCHOOL ENROLLMENT AND TYPE OF SCHOOL 

Persons 3 years and over enrolled in school 
Preprimary school 

Public school 

Elementary or high school 

Public school 

College 

Public college 

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT 

Persons 25 years and over 

Less than 9th grade 

9th to 1 2th grade, no diploma 

High school graduate (includes equivalency) 

Some college, no degree 

Associate degree 

Bachelor's degree 

Graduate or professional degree 

Percent high school graduate or higher 

Percent bachelor's degree or higher 

FERTILITY 

Children ever born per 1,000 women 15 to 24 years ... 

Children ever born per 1,000 women 25 to 34 years .. 

Children ever born per 1,000 women 35 to 44 years .. 

RESIDENCE IN 1985 

Persons 5 years and over 

Same house 

Different house in United States 

Central city of this MSA/PMSA 

Remainder of this MSA/PMSA 

Different MSA/PMSA 

Not in an MSA/PMSA 

Abroad 

URBAN, RURAL, AND FARM RESIDENCE 

Urban population 

In housing units on properties of less man 1 acre 

Rural population 

In housing units on properties of less than 1 acre 

On farms 

JOURNEY TO WORK 

Workers 16 years and over 

Car, truck, or van 

Drove alone 

Carpooled 

Public transportation (including taxicab) 

Bus or trolley bus or streetcar or trolley car 

Subway or elevated, railroad, or ferryboat 

Walked 

Other means 

Worked at home 

Persons per cor, truck, or van 

Mean travel time to work (minutes) 

Departure time for work: 

5:00 a.m. to 5:59 a.m... 

6:00 a.m. to 6:59 a.m... 

7:00 a.m. to 7:59 a.m 

8:00 a.m. to 8:59 a.m 

All other times 

Worked in MSA of residence 

Florence city 

Lake City city 

Remainder of Florence County 

Worked outside MSA of residence 

Kingstree town 

Remainder of Williamsburg County 

Darlington city 

Remainder of Darlington County 

Sumter city 

Remainder of Sumter County 

Georgetown County 

Marion County 

Horry County 

Charleston city 

Remainder of Charleston, SC MSA 

Columbia city 

Remainder of Columbia, SC MSA 

Worked elsewhere 



4 228 

4 177 
51 



29 



2 017 

1 987 
30 



1 453 

1 453 



250 

250 



730 

730 



3 938 


1 955 


1 279 


250 


672 


41 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


195 


92 


31 


- 


36 


85 


35 


9 


- 


16 


26 


22 


8 


- 


27 


12 
6 

15 
5 


4 


- 


- 


12 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 571 


508 


477 


59 


216 


62 


35 


59 


- 


25 


41 


35 


59 


- 


25 


667 


313 


355 


59 


148 


628 


287 


350 


59 


148 


842 


160 


63 


- 


43 


842 


137 


58 


- 


30 


2 145 


1 425 


728 


195 


402 


356 


81 


165 


19 


66 


475 


370 


187 


64 


146 


825 


507 


241 


71 


127 


252 


191 


67 


26 


48 


114 


149 


13 


- 


4 


97 


100 


39 


- 


6 


26 


27 


16 


15 


5 


61.3 


68.4 


51.6 


57.4 


47.3 


5.7 


8.9 


7.6 


7.7 


2.7 


196 


125 


769 




711 


1 471 


1 059 


2 026 


1 957 


1 275 


2 207 


2 117 


1 980 


- 


2 000 


3 938 


1 955 


1 279 


250 


672 


1 974 


1 261 


906 


163 


493 


1 945 


694 


373 


87 


179 


401 


115 


164 


65 


93 


587 


324 


179 


8 


76 


498 


179 


25 


14 


10 


459 


76 


5 


- 


_ 


19 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


2 000 


2 017 


1 453 


224 


650 


1 418 


1 822 


799 


146 


421 


2 228 


- 


- 


26 


80 


768 


- 


- 


18 


80 


65 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


2 041 


1 164 


521 


145 


296 


1 876 


1 145 


465 


122 


252 


1 584 


1 026 


283 


103 


152 


292 


119 


182 


19 


100 


6 


- 


23 


7 


24 


- 


- 


5 


- 


24 


109 


_ 


16 


11 


20 


17 


- 


7 


_ 


_ 


33 


19 


10 


5 


- 


1.09 


1.07 


1.29 


1.08 


1.31 


18.5 


17.6 


16.1 


18.9 


14,2 


84 


44 


42 


7 


_ 


362 


169 


113 


48 


32 


671 


381 


165 


22 


136 


327 


252 


59 


9 


64 


564 


299 


132 


54 


64 


1 874 


1 096 


497 


123 


284 


1 127 


657 


319 


83 


216 


14 


25 


_ 


_ 


_ 


733 


414 


178 


40 


68 


167 


68 


24 


22 


12 


15 


- 


- 


- 




7 


4 


19 


_ 


6 


50 


17 


- 


6 


- 


6 
9 

10 


- 


5 


- 


- 


15 


- 


- 


- 


6 

12 


8 


- 


- 


- 


12 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


40 


24 


- 


16 


6 



185 

157 
28 



168 

19 



51 



36 
36 

15 
8 



132 

37 
25 
29 
14 

11 
16 

72.0 
20.5 



3 000 
2 429 



168 

80 
88 

21 
20 
47 



185 
109 



82 

82 
75 

7 



1.04 
19.8 



8 
18 
38 
18 

52 
52 



30 



23 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 51 



Table 17. Social Characteristics of Persons: 1990— Con. 

[Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



PLACE OF BIRTH 

All persons 

Native 

Foreign born 

LANGUAGE SPOKEN AT HOME AND ABILITY TO 
SPEAK ENGLISH 

Linguistically isolated households 

Persons 5 yeors and over 

In linguistically isolated households 

Speak a language other than English 

Do not speak English "very well" 

Speok Spanish 

Do not speak English "very well" 

Linguistically isolated 

Speak an Asian or Pacific Island language 

Do not speak English "very well" 

Linguistically isolated 

SCHOOL ENROLLMENT AND TYPE OF SCHOOL 

Persons 3 yeors and over enrolled in school 
Preprimary school 

Public school 

Elementory or high school 

Public school 

College 

Public college 

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT 

Persons 25 years and over 

Less than 9th grade 

9th to 12th grade, no diploma 

High school graduate (includes equivalency) 

Some college, no degree 

Associate degree 

Bachelor's degree 

Graduate or professional degree 

Percent high school graduate or higher 

Percent bachelor's degree or higher 

FERTILITY 

Children ever born per 1,000 women 15 to 24 years.. 
Children ever born per 1,000 women 25 to 34 years. . 
Children ever born per 1,000 women 35 to 44 years .. 

RESIDENCE IN 1985 

Persons 5 years and over 

Same house 

Different house in United States 

Central city of this MSA/PMSA 

Remainder of this MSA/PMSA 

Different MSA/PMSA 

Not in an MSA/PMSA... , 

Abroad 

URBAN, RURAL, AND FARM RESIDENCE 

Urban population 

In housing units on properties of less than 1 acre 

Rural population 

In housing units on properties of less than 1 acre 

On farms 

JOURNEY TO WORK 

Workers 16 years and over 

Car, truck, or van 

Drove alone 

Carpooled 

Public transportation (including taxicab) 

Bus or trolley bus or streetcar or trolley car 

Subway or elevated, railroad, or ferryboat 

Walked 

Other means 

Worked at home 

Persons per car, truck, or van 

Mean travel time to work (minutes) 

Departure time for work: 

5:00 a.m. to 5:59 a.m. 

6:00 a.m. to 6.59 a.m 

7:00 a.m. to 7:59 a.m 

8:00 a.m. to 8:59 a.m 

All other times 

Worked in MSA of residence 

Florence city 

Lake City city 

Remainder of Florence County 

Worked outside MSA of residence 

Kingstree town 

Remainder of Williamsburg County 

Darlington city 

Remainder of Darlington County 

Sumter city 

Remainder of Sumter County 

Georgetown County 

Marion County 

Horry County 

Charleston city 

Remainder of Charleston, SC MSA 

Columbia city 

Remainder of Columbia, SC MSA 

Worked elsewhere 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 13 (pt.) 



Tract 14 (pt.) Tract 15.01 (pt.) 



Tract 15.02 Tract 16.01 (pt.) 



Tract 16.02 



1 387 

1 336 
51 



22 



922 5 502 

915 5 432 

7 70 



36 



4 425 3 900 

4 425 3 884 

16 



3 905 

3 896 
9 



Tract 17 



2 011 

2 011 



Tract 18 



3 481 

3 481 



1 306 


806 


5 062 


4 119 


3 590 


3 670 


1 868 


3 295 


34 


— 


44 


— 


16 


_ 


_ 


8 


142 


15 


186 


68 


70 


41 


56 


74 


63 


- 


96 


11 


59 


33 


14 


30 


50 


- 


49 


12 


26 


24 


24 


32 


20 


- 


28 


- 


26 


16 




13 


- 


- 


- 


- 


16 


- 


- 


5 



290 


245 


1 750 


1 340 


1 077 


1 090 


551 


1 091 


- 


31 


114 


82 


29 


88 


24 


37 


- 


6 


42 


77 


5 


64 


10 


22 


199 


165 


1 311 


1 035 


865 


828 


447 


839 


178 


157 


1 239 


935 


826 


805 


416 


817 


91 


49 


325 


223 


183 


174 


80 


215 


87 


49 


267 


223 


132 


151 


73 


201 


980 


551 


3 234 


2 707 


2 328 


2 498 


1 255 


2 216 


130 


58 


260 


370 


229 


409 


298 


436 


252 


52 


682 


661 


399 


549 


280 


483 


275 


108 


1 166 


1 011 


819 


826 


355 


733 


160 


95 


363 


338 


457 


313 


217 


276 


84 


60 


291 


150 


180 


197 


65 


105 


64 


108 


340 


137 


201 


152 


35 


119 


15 


70 


132 


40 


43 


52 


5 


64 


61.0 


80.0 


70.9 


61.9 


,73.0 


61.6 


53.9 


58.5 


8.1 


32.3 


14.6 


6.5 


10.5 


8.2 


3.2 


8.3 


187 


310 


158 


219 


326 


279 


265 


336 


1 198 


1 892 


1 280 


2 200 


1 402 


1 475 


1 133 


1 692 


1 413 


2 222 


2 338 


2 052 


2 046 


1 936 


2 418 


2 367 


1 306 


806 


5 062 


4 119 


3 590 


3 670 


1 868 


3 295 


899 


477 


3 054 


2 487 


1 930 


2 563 


1 362 


2 338 


407 


329 


1 985 


1 602 


1 660 


1 107 


506 


957 


58 


70 


242 


279 


379 


234 


44 


21 


137 


90 


1 170 


1 004 


704 


628 


339 


682 


113 


75 


391 


170 


201 


165 


83 


112 


99 


94 


182 


149 


376 


80 


40 


142 


— 


— 


23 


30 


- 


- 






1 387 


563 


989 




2 638 








1 147 


475 


928 


- 


2 028 


_ 


_ 




- 


359 


4 513 


4 425 


1 262 


3 905 


2 011 


3 481 


- 


332 


2 539 


1 816 


736 


1 384 


1 003 


1 580 


" 


" 


162 


179 


~~ 


352 


105 


557 


814 


455 


2 648 


2 020 


1 975 


1 849 


840 


1 633 


757 


433 


2 541 


1 947 


1 876 


1 718 


807 


1 565 


660 


378 


2 139 


1 744 


1 488 


1 458 


603 


1 293 


97 


55 


402 


203 


388 


260 


204 


272 


- 


- 


14 


- 


- 


6 


_ 


14 


- 


- 


14 


- 


- 


6 


- 


14 


4 


_ 


10 


32 


51 


31 


_ 


12 


7 


- 


28 


15 


8 


19 


17 


23 


46 


22 


55 


26 


40 


75 


16 


19 


1.07 


1.07 


1.10 


1.06 


1.12 


1.09 


1.17 


1.11 


13.8 


19.1 


20.8 


21.0 


17.4 


24.1 


23.3 


23.7 


43 


6 


106 


115 


97 


68 


73 


59 


88 


94 


481 


492 


393 


467 


165 


427 


243 


160 


1 007 


692 


729 


683 


302 


600 


138 


60 


528 


222 


379 


261 


63 


202 


256 


113 


471 


473 


337 


295 


221 


326 


713 


383 


2 304 


1 862 


1 806 


1 740 


754 


1 426 


442 


226 


1 217 


1 152 


1 110 


807 


317 


395 


- 


5 


- 


9 


17 


7 


17 


65 


271 


152 


1 087 


701 


679 


926 


420 


966 


101 


72 


344 


158 


169 


109 


86 


207 


- 


- 


- 


8 


- 


- 


- 


10 


- 


- 


33 


18 


6 


14 


31 


63 


- 


12 


53 


7 


40 


6 


_ 


2 


32 


16 


141 


39 


24 
5 


15 


19 


16 


13 


- 


_ 


21 


8 


_ 




- 


- 


5 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


13 


- 


27 


10 


- 


34 


8 


9 


1 


- 


- 


8 


6 


8 


6 


- 


48 


— 


- 


5 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


3 


5 


6 


- 


- 


_ 


8 


8 


4 


- 


3 


7 


- 


5 


_ 


_ 




- 


- 


- 


12 


- 


_ 


8 


2 


51 


8 


82 


47 


47 


44 


11 


45 



52 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 17. Social Characteristics of Persons: 1990 -Con. 

[Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 19 



Tract 20 



Tract 22.01 



Tract 22.02 



Tract 23 



Tract 24.98 



Tract 25 



Tract 26 



PLACE OF BIRTH 

All persons 

Native 

Foreign born 

LANGUAGE SPOKEN AT HOME AND ABILITY TO 

SPEAK ENGLISH 
Linguistically isolated households 

Persons 5 years and over 

In linguistically isoloted households 

Speak a language other than English 

Do not speak English "very well" 

Speak Spanish 

Do not speak English "very well" 

Linguistically isolated 

Speak an Asian or Pacific Island language 

Do not speak English "very well" 

Linguistically isolated 

SCHOOL ENROLLMENT AND TYPE OF SCHOOL 

Persons 3 years and over enrolled in school 
Preprimary school 

Public school 

Elementary or high school 

Public school 

College 

Public college 

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT 

Persons 25 years and over 

Less than 9th grade 

9th to 12th grade, no diploma 

High school graduate (includes equivalency) 

Some college, no degree 

Associate degree 

Bachelor's degree 

Graduate or professional degree 

Percent high school graduate or higher 

Percent bachelor's degree or higher 

FERTILITY 

Children ever born per 1,000 women 15 to 24 years .. 
Children ever born per 1,000 women 25 to 34 years -- 
Children ever born per 1,000 women 35 to 44 years .. 

RESIDENCE IN 1985 

Persons 5 years and over 

Same house 

Different house in United States 

Central city of this MSA/PMSA 

Remainder of this MSA/PMSA 

Different MSA/PMSA 

Not in an MSA/PMSA 

Abroad 

URBAN, RURAL, AND FARM RESIDENCE 

Urban population 

In housing units on properties of less than 1 acre 

Rural population 

In housing units on properties of less than 1 acre 

On farms 

JOURNEY TO WORK 

Workers 16 years and over 

Car, truck, or van 

Drove alone 

Carpooled 

Public transportation (including taxicab) 

Bus or trolley bus or streetcar or trolley car 

Subway or elevated, railrood, or ferryboat 

Walked 

Other means 

Worked at home 

Persons per car, truck, or van 

Mean travel time to work (minutes) 

Departure time for work: 

5:00 a.m. to 5:59 a.m 

6.00 a.m. to 6:59 a.m 

7:00 a.m. to 7:59 a.m 

8:00 a.m. to 8:59 a.m 

All other times 

Worked in MSA of residence 

Florence city 

Lake City city 

Remainder of Florence County 

Worked outside MSA of residence 

Kingstree town 

Remainder of Williamsburg County 

Darlington city 

Remainder of Darlington County 

Sumter city 

Remainder of Sumter County 

Georgetown County 

Marion County 

Horry County 

Charleston city 

Remainder of Charleston, SC MSA 

Columbia city 

Remainder of Columbia, SC MSA 

Worked elsewhere 



6 111 

6 078 
33 



5 654 

107 
32 
40 
22 



1 620 

109 
99 
1 349 
1 310 
162 
143 



3 592 

806 
821 
1 188 
360 
166 
163 
88 

54.7 
7.0 



519 

1 687 

2 075 



5 654 

3 646 
1 982 

1 002 

188 

792 

26 



6 111 

3 414 

299 



2 580 

2 424 

1 779 

645 

18 

18 

38 
53 
47 

1.18 
23.3 

143 
579 
1 058 
276 
477 

1 545 

119 

48 

1 378 

1 035 

53 

582 

3 

4 

21 

101 
29 
147 
9 
27 
2 

16 
41 



4 346 

4 323 
23 



3 945 

175 
56 
68 
24 

9 
4 



1 245 

73 
70 
930 
879 
242 
190 



! 538 

551 
650 
853 
252 

98 
110 

24 

52.7 
5.3 



588 

1 887 

2 587 



3 945 

2 543 

1 395 

24 

1 170 

49 

152 

7 



93 

79 

4 253 

2 333 

280 



1 726 

1 578 

1 246 

332 

18 

7 



101 
25 
4 

1.14 
21.5 

106 
376 
691 
200 
349 

1 436 

151 

569 

716 

290 

33 

129 

9 

2 

2 

38 

5 

13 



4 
17 

38 



5 706 

5 701 
5 



5 296 



83 

5 

15 



1 917 

91 
49 
1 633 
1 588 
193 
185 



3 219 

781 
861 
974 
294 

90 
132 

87 

49.0 
6.8 



500 

1 930 

2 324 



5 296 

3 428 

1 868 

16 

1 430 

276 

146 



4 313 

2 970 

1 393 

812 

60 



2 040 

1 791 

1 240 

551 

47 

47 

115 
71 
16 

1.25 
20.3 

118 
423 
763 
275 
445 

1 661 
211 
928 
522 
379 
48 
156 

11 
7 
17 



77 



63 



3 282 

3 269 
13 



3 006 



76 
21 
22 

14 



950 

35 

25 
761 
735 
154 
131 



! 107 

394 
420 
468 
235 
100 
372 
118 

61.4 
23.3 



547 

1 558 

2 160 



3 006 

1 779 

1 227 

87 

765 

247 

128 



2 747 

1 932 

535 

299 

34 



1 175 

1 113 
916 
197 



30 
11 
21 

1.11 

18.7 

60 
231 
402 
279 
182 

1 003 

145 

571 

287 

172 

46 

29 

5 

13 



6 
38 
24 



3 081 

3 077 
4 



2 887 



64 
29 
30 
18 



717 

9 

3 

610 

598 

98 

98 



1 919 

487 
588 
555 
118 
104 
54 
13 

44.0 

3.5 



431 

1 783 

2 235 



2 887 

2 049 

838 

51 

703 

16 



3 081 

1 297 

147 



1 338 



1 265 

998 

267 

3 

3 

11 
43 
16 

1.14 

24.5 

113 
253 
505 
177 
274 

1 188 
323 
234 
631 

150 

33 
39 
9 
9 
14 
2 
4 
2 
3 



3 

30 



3 863 

3 863 



3 559 

9 
54 
30 
11 



994 

55 
28 
838 
810 
101 
93 



2 331 

568 
510 
726 
255 

90 
125 
57 

53.8 
7.8 



307 

1 728 

2 820 



3 559 

2 307 

1 249 

64 

820 

143 

222 

3 



3 863 

1 832 

306 



1 607 

1 496 

1 107 

389 

18 

18 

29 
47 

17 

1.18 

236 

156 
347 
659 
189 
239 

1 303 
211 
285 
807 
304 
12 
27 

12 
61 
21 



8 
6 
5 

152 



3 039 

3 028 
11 



2 799 

44 
20 
35 

11 



841 
23 

13 

745 

675 

73 

46 



1 804 

304 

634 

545 

199 

39 

72 

11 

48.0 

4.6 



477 
2 072 
2 723 



2 799 

2 037 

762 

14 

560 

40 

148 



3 039 

1 236 

200 



1 339 

1 240 
713 
527 



65 

6 

28 

1.31 

24.2 

104 
328 
459 
118 
302 

1 159 
398 

761 
180 



21 
70 



40 



26 



3 600 

3 592 



319 

6 
102 
58 
46 
32 



1 039 

47 
35 
855 
787 
137 
123 



2 134 

390 
444 
798 
203 

97 
146 

56 

60.9 

9.5 



364 

1 645 

2 247 



3 319 

2 492 
805 

71 
539 

83 
112 

22 



3 600 

2 287 

183 



1 377 

1 270 
979 
291 

13 

7 

43 
24 
27 

1.14 
21.9 

151 
307 
412 
182 
298 

1 209 

537 

3 

669 

168 

4 
36 
55 
9 
4 
2 

4 
3 



7 
44 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 53 



Table 18. Labor Force and Disability Characteristics of Persons: 1990 

[Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



LABOR FORCE STATUS 

Persons 16 years and over 

In labor force 

Percent of persons 16 years and over 

Civilian labor force 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Percent of civilian labor force 

Not in labor force 

Institutionalized persons 

Enrolled in school 

Noninstitutionalized persons 65 years and over, not 

enrolled in school 

Females 16 years and over 

In labor force 

Percent of females 16 years and over 

Civilian labor force 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Percent of civilian labor force 

With own children under 6 years 

In labor force 

With own children 6 to 17 years only 

In labor force 

Own children under 6 years in families and 

subfamilies 

All parents present in household in labor force 

Own children 6 to 17 years in families and 

subfamilies 

All parents present in household in labor force 

Persons 16 to 19 years 

Not enrolled in school 

Unemployed or not in labor force 

Not high school graduate 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Not in labor force 

OCCUPATION AND SELECTED INDUSTRIES 

Employed persons 16 years and over 

Executive, administrative, and managerial occupations 

Professional specialty occupations 

Technicians and related support occupations 

Sales occupations 

Administrative support occupations, including clerical 

Private household occupations 

Protective service occupations 

Service occupations, except protective and household 

Farming, forestry, and fishing occupations 

Precision production, craft, and repair occupations 

Machine operators, assemblers, and inspectors 

Transportation and material moving occupations 

Handlers, equipment cleaners, helpers, and laborers 

Construction 

Manufacturing 

Transportation, communications, and other utilities 

Wholesale and retail trade 

Finance, insurance, and real estate 

Business and repair services 

Professional and related services 

CLASS OF WORKER 

Employed persons 16 years and over 

Private wage and salary workers 

Government workers 

Local government workers 

Self-employed workers 

WORK STATUS IN 1989 

Persons 16 years and over who worked in 
1989 

Usually worked 35 or more hours per week 

50 to 52 weeks 

40 to 49 weeks 

27 to 39 weeks— 

Usually worked 1 to 34 hours per week, 40 to 52 weeks 

DISABILITY 

Civilian noninstitutionalized persons 16 to 64 

years 

With a mobility or self-care limitation 

With a mobility limitation 

In labor force 

With a self-care limitation 

With a work disability 

In labor force 

Prevented from working 

No work disability 

In labor force 

Civilian noninstitutionalized persons 65 years 

and over 

With a mobility or self -care limitation 

With a mobility limitation 

With a self-care limitation 

WORKERS IN FAMILY IN 1989 

No workers 

Mean family income (dollars) 

1 worker 

Mean family income (dollars) 

2 or more workers 

Mean family income (dollars) 



Florence County 



Florence, SC 
MSA 



Total Florence city 



85 638 

55 066 

64.3 

54 916 

51 984 

2 932 

5.3 

30 572 

1 502 

5 380 

10 207 
46 358 

26 452 

57.1 

26 437 

24 788 



9 749 

6 241 

21 286 

15 054 

7 608 

1 486 
752 
809 
253 
124 
432 



51 984 



900 
221 
734 
376 
379 
306 
652 
975 
568 
972 
645 
225 
031 



5 
I 
6 
5 
2 
2 

3 702 

11 961 

2 829 
11 385 

3 229 
1 865 

11 468 



51 984 

41 209 
7 260 

2 111 

3 137 



58 000 

46 718 

33 534 

5 771 

2 818 

5 898 



71 922 

6 594 
2 566 
573 
568 
111 
061 
642 



5 
7 
2 

4 

64 811 
51 173 

12 064 

3 462 
2 665 
2 147 



3 631 
14 894 

8 723 
25 478 
17 801 
44 958 



85 638 

55 066 

64.3 

54 916 

51 984 

2 932 

5.3 

30 572 

1 502 

5 380 

10 207 
46 358 

26 452 

57.1 

26 437 

24 788 



649 
6,2 
790 
457 
077 
920 



9 749 

6 241 

21 286 

15 054 

7 608 
1 486 

752 
809 
253 
124 
432 



51 984 

4 
6 
1 
6 
7 



900 
221 
734 
376 
379 
306 
652 
975 
568 
972 
645 
225 
031 



3 702 

11 961 

2 829 
11 385 

3 229 
1 865 

11 468 



51 984 

41 209 
7 260 

2 111 

3 137 



58 000 

46 718 

33 534 

5 771 

2 818 

5 898 



71 922 

6 594 
2 566 

573 
5 568 

7 111 
2 061 
4 642 

64 811 
51 173 



12 064 

3 462 
2 665 
2 147 



3 631 
14 894 

8 723 
25 478 
17 801 
44 958 



22 794 

13 804 

60.6 

13 776 

12 924 

852 

6.2 

8 990 

934 

1 259 

3 353 
12 753 

6 960 
54.6 

6 952 

6 475 
477 
6.9 

1 720 

1 111 

2 062 

1 658 

2 497 

1 607 

4 756 

3 585 
1 721 

376 
260 
247 
40 
69 
138 



12 924 

1 571 

2 037 
475 

1 834 

) 732 
106 
134 

1 850 
121 

1 105 

1 071 
517 
371 

760 

2 204 
799 

2 749 
1 086 

458 

3 693 



12 924 

9 988 

2 115 

551 

768 



14 551 

11 415 

7 871 

1 529 

779 

1 813 



17 833 



Totals for split tracts/BNA's in Florence County 



Tract 2.01 



Tract 2.02 



Tract 3 



959 
890 
169 
693 
830 
461 
319 
003 
768 



3 999 

1 102 
910 
711 



1 048 
22 269 

2 278 
28 364 

4 146 
52 541 



1 594 

1 166 

73.1 

1 151 

1 128 

23 

2.0 

428 

96 

83 
788 

511 

64.8 

511 

504 

7 

1.4 

142 

92 

170 

126 

190 

114 

420 

276 
147 

12 



1 128 

187 
213 



149 
164 

6 
123 
12 
110 
42 
21 
53 

37 
225 

62 
248 

91 

25 
351 



1 128 

892 
150 
68 



1 219 

977 
730 
130 
21 
129 



1 469 

85 
26 

68 
92 
31 
61 
1 377 
1 093 

110 

34 
26 



26 
10 952 

201 
79 247 

389 
73 537 



2 745 

2 017 

73.5 

2 003 

1 930 

73 

3.6 

728 

110 

239 
1 517 

1 025 
67.6 

1 018 
960 
58 
5.7 
133 
105 
308 
244 

199 

164 

566 

391 
219 

33 

17 
17 



1 930 

286 

339 

95 

275 

383 

13 

20 

87 

22 

257 

80 

60 

13 

110 
335 
140 
457 
163 
61 
480 



1 930 

1 529 

299 

64 

84 



2 112 

1 719 

1 431 

80 

116 

193 



2 425 

57 
20 

44 

212 

92 

93 

2 213 

1 852 

306 

41 
25 
35 



104 
26 202 

247 
34 763 

624 
53 035 



2 752 

1 940 
70.5 



1 940 

1 813 

127 

6.5 

812 

174 

253 
1 505 

985 
65.4 
985 
916 
69 
7.0 
223 
159 
350 
304 

262 

200 

816 

650 
276 

36 
16 
10 
8 



1 813 

183 
323 

93 

156 

252 

7 

51 
215 

12 
238 
130 
118 

35 

80 
380 
113 
339 
52 
69 
586 



1 813 

1 296 

433 

132 

72 



2 029 

1 672 

1 167 

227 

153 

158 



2 447 

320 

63 

20 

282 

178 

54 

102 

2 269 

1 834 

305 

70 
38 
54 



93 
13 232 

225 
27 683 

713 
42 006 



Tract 5 



3 324 

2 180 
65.6 

2 180 

2 074 
106 
4.9 

1 144 

500 

206 
1 784 

1 045 
58.6 

1 045 
987 
58 
5.6 
216 
135 
322 
212 

314 

209 

654 

443 
556 

62 
21 
25 
11 

14 



2 074 

155 
191 

46 

205 

346 

4 

43 
381 

29 
338 
187 

70 

79 

180 
410 

68 
540 
190 

74 
485 



074 

692 

290 

94 

92 



2 636 

1 790 

1 217 

204 

124 

419 



3 070 

214 

21 

205 

211 
94 

111 
2 859 
2 038 

254 

68 
36 
36 



61 
10 909 

342 
22 006 

637 
47 502 



Tract 6 



2 467 

1 784 

72.3 

1 784 

1 763 

21 

1.2 

683 

120 

201 
1 321 

896 
67.8 
896 
896 



170 
147 
266 
219 



201 

159 

500 

391 
218 

50 

7 
7 

7 



1 763 

154 
225 
93 
268 
382 

13 
212 

262 
68 

42 
44 

119 
241 
102 
448 
207 
68 
496 



1 763 

1 435 

248 

52 

68 



1 806 

1 479 
1 130 

143 
72 

219 



2 215 

80 
47 

60 
194 
49 
127 
2 021 
1 684 

252 

72 
63 
38 



110 

24 908 
219 

25 945 
624 

43 419 



Tract 7 



3 478 

1 607 
46.2 

1 607 

1 420 
187 
11.6 

1 871 
393 
242 



459 
1 994 

911 
45.7 
911 
794 
117 
12.8 
311 
178 
360 
293 

515 

324 

792 

577 

316 

99 



7 

16 
65 



1 420 

34 

84 

63 

151 

102 

21 

26 

360 

18 

214 

229 

60 

58 

112 

236 
56 

353 
60 
72 

315 



1 420 

1 140 

207 

73 

63 



1 677 

1 217 

678 

284 

65 

208 



2 535 

566 

337 

5 

502 

526 

63 

463 

2 009 

1 481 

550 

227 

180 
160 



194 
7 646 

363 
11 347 

441 
32 294 



Tract 8 



4 055 


2 454 


60.5 


2 454 


2 218 


236 


9.6 


1 601 


407 


464 


2 358 


1 313 


55.7 


1 313 


1 201 


112 


8.5 


369 


213 


489 


383 


542 


319 


1 148 


870 


488 


71 


59 


48 


7 


34 


7 


2 218 


93 


114 


46 


158 


233 


29 


35 


647 


17 


201 


396 


137 


112 


155 


509 


182 


485 


127 


53 


560 


2 218 


1 721 


398 


143 


94 


2 518 


1 935 


1 234 


267 


209 


308 


3 487 


474 


248 


72 


365 


456 


136 


303 


3 031 


2 231 


568 


195 


145 


84 


154 


4 776 


565 


13 417 



34 619 



54 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 18. Labor Force and Disability Characteristics of Persons: 1990— Con. 

[Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text) 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Totals for split tracts/BNA's in Florence County— Con. 



Tract 9 



Tract 10 



Tract 1 1 



Tract 12 



Tract 13 



Tract 14 



Tract 15.01 



Tract 16.01 



Florence city, Florence County 



Tract 2.01 

(pt.) Tract 2.02 (pt.) 



LABOR FORCE STATUS 

Persons 16 years and over 

In labor force 

Percent of persons 16 years and over 

Civilian labor force 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Percent of civilian labor force 

Not in lobor force 

Institutionalized persons 

Enrolled in school 

Noninstitutionalized persons 65 years and over, not 

enrolled in school 

Females 16 years and over 

In labor force 

Percent of females 16 years and over 

Civilian labor force 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Percent of civilian labor force 

With own children under 6 years 

In labor force 

With own children 6 to 17 years only 

In labor force 

Own children under 6 years in families and 

subfamilies 

All parents present in household in labor force 

Own children 6 to 17 years in families and 

subfamilies 

All parents present in household in labor force 

Persons 16 to 19 years -. 

Not enrolled in school 

Unemployed or not in labor force 

Not high school graduate 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Not in labor force 

OCCUPATION AND SELECTED INDUSTRIES 

Employed persons 16 years and over 

Executive, administrative, ond managerial occupations 

Professional specialty occupations 

Technicians and related support occupations 

Sales occupations 

Administrative support occupations, including clerical 

Private household occupations 

Protective service occupations 

Service occupations, except protective and household 

Farming, forestry, and fishing occupations 

Precision production, craft, and repair occupations 

Machine operators, assemblers, and inspectors 

Transportation and material moving occupations 

Handlers, equipment cleaners, helpers, and laborers 

Construction 

Manufacturing 

Transportation, communications, and other utilities 

Wholesale and retail trade 

Finance, insurance, and real estate 

Business and repair services 

Professional and related services 

CLASS OF WORKER 

Employed persons 16 years and over 

Private wage and salary workers 

Government workers 

Local government workers 

Self-employed workers 

WORK STATUS IN 1989 

Persons 16 years and over who worked in 
1989.. 

Usually worked 35 or more hours per week 

50 to 52 weeks 

40 to 49 weeks 

27 to 39 weeks 

Usually worked 1 to 34 hours per week, 40 to 52 weeks 

DISABILITY 

Civilian noninstitutionalized persons 16 to 64 

years 

With a mobility or self-care limitation 

With a mobility limitation 

In labor force 

With a self-care limitation 

With a work disability 

In labor force 

Prevented from working 

No work disability 

In labor force 

Civilian noninstitutionalized persons 65 years 

and over 

With a mobility or self-care limitation 

With a mobility limitation 

With a self-care limitation 

WORKERS IN FAMILY IN 1989 

No workers 

Mean family income (dollars) 

1 worker 

Mean family income (dollars) 

2 or more workers 

Mean family income (dollars) 



3 058 

1 646 
53.8 

1 619 

1 413 
206 
12.7 

1 412 
164 
210 

424 
1 724 

876 
50.8 
868 
749 
119 
13.7 
188 
124 
323 
229 

350 

207 

789 

581 
286 

92 

57 
78 
21 
9 
48 



1 413 

46 

88 

5 

105 

148 

36 

18 

370 

21 

138 

204 

128 

106 

122 

275 
74 

322 
74 
56 

310 



1 413 

1 145 
181 
86 
82 



1 585 

1 243 

712 

227 

55 

213 



2 376 

414 

180 

50 

345 

326 

74 

244 

2 050 

1 484 

491 

158 
135 
101 



145 
5 597 

379 
15 786 

401 
28 183 



1 706 

793 

46.5 

793 

770 

23 

2.9 

913 

332 

49 

370 
921 

379 

41.2 

379 

366 

13 

3.4 

101 

80 

61 

49 

188 

145 

188 

142 
60 

16 
16 
16 



770 

64 
90 
81 
74 
90 

16 
188 
17 
89 
29 
17 
15 

78 
78 
22 

158 
85 
24 

201 



770 

610 
105 
30 
55 



960 

823 

582 

85 

56 

82 



969 

153 
68 
32 
136 
158 
70 
88 
811 
695 

405 

144 
125 
92 



92 

18 299 
109 

19 961 
202 

34 339 



3 713 

2 554 
68.8 



554 
474 

80 
3.1 
159 

45 
106 



707 
2 160 



335 
61.8 
335 
304 
31 
2.3 
206 
139 
218 
199 

329 

231 

574 

509 
168 

63 
35 
26 

14 
12 



2 474 

251 
481 
116 
395 
430 

21 
172 
39 

249 
170 

101 
49 

138 
351 
192 
516 
211 
117 
744 



2 474 

1 898 

446 

77 

121 



2 637 

2 148 

1 608 

236 

164 

293 



2 794 

168 

43 

5 

142 

197 

64 

133 

2 597 

2 339 

874 

193 
179 

125 



161 

48 607 
340 

24 575 
642 

49 305 



2 686 

1 702 

63.4 

1 702 

1 663 

39 

2.3 

984 

76 

425 
1 479 

752 

50.8 

752 

734 

18 

2.4 

169 

98 

234 

156 

212 

109 

521 

319 
116 

20 

7 



1 663 

271 
487 
84 
336 
211 

21 
106 
6 
57 
27 
32 
25 

47 
195 

90 
354 
188 

64 
612 



1 663 

1 238 

239 

35 

178 



1 837 



339 
965 
206 
57 
346 



2 120 

89 

39 

8 

63 
127 
38 
80 
1 993 
1 540 

566 

91 
69 
66 



143 
32 513 

338 
69 480 

552 
76 521 



2 925 

2 071 

70.8 

2 071 

2 007 

64 

3.1 

854 

87 

465 
1 467 

944 
64.3 
944 
924 
20 
2.1 
184 
140 
210 
170 

251 

192 

415 

296 
185 

14 
10 
3 



2 007 

338 
244 
60 
346 
366 

12 
120 

30 
244 
113 

67 

67 

139 
395 

77 
544 
182 

95 
433 



2 007 

1 617 

230 

62 

156 



2 163 

1 723 

1 279 

166 

144 

290 



2 429 

206 
49 
21 
195 
198 
82 
111 
2 231 
1 958 

496 

142 
91 
98 



164 
22 292 

203 
28 095 

644 
62 833 



3 511 

2 452 

69.8 

2 445 

2 377 

68 

2.8 

1 059 

183 

420 
1 823 

1 109 

60.8 

1 109 

1 058 

51 

4.6 

327 

224 

388 

332 

428 

309 

761 

591 
240 

22 
10 
22 

12 

10 



2 377 

545 

610 

65 

420 

275 

41 

20 

96 

192 
50 
34 
29 

67 
436 
119 
434 
222 

51 
786 



2 377 

1 735 
472 
115 
145 



621 

060 
590 
213 
98 
300 



3 018 

151 
61 
41 
131 
127 
54 
57 
2 891 
2 341 

486 

101 
89 

74 



128 
29 743 

286 
44 865 

927 
67 974 



3 925 

2 756 

70.2 

2 742 

2 666 

76 

2.8 

1 169 

282 

302 

2 080 

1 273 

61.2 

1 273 

1 237 

36 

2.8 

352 

223 

490 

371 

489 

273 

1 270 

857 
376 

117 
34 
49 
34 

15 



2 666 

300 
207 
108 
294 
341 
8 

16 
321 

82 
381 
344 
116 
148 

289 

596 
159 
620 
139 
83 
522 



2 666 

2 179 

280 

44 

183 



941 

540 
862 
346 
112 
244 



3 558 

220 

116 

3 

203 

293 

55 

220 

3 265 

2 652 

353 

103 
65 
85 



105 

11 036 

363 

22 633 

1 008 

43 235 



3 053 

2 227 

72.9 

2 227 

2 083 

144 

6.5 

826 

108 

162 

211 
1 649 

1 128 

68.4 

1 128 

1 046 

82 

7.3 

274 

210 

370 

319 

460 

351 

810 

693 
329 

68 
28 
30 

14 
5 
11 



2 083 

160 
209 
85 
343 
356 

11 
212 

34 
264 
206 
132 

71 

55 
488 
120 
453 
183 
104 
443 



2 083 

1 742 

265 

49 

69 



2 265 

1 891 
1 340 

290 
78 

172 



2 656 

265 

88 

20 

219 

261 

97 

140 

2 395 

2 052 

289 

52 
20 

41 



125 
10 042 

259 
25 276 

731 
40 002 



104 

104 

100.0 

104 

103 

1 
1.0 



53 

53 

100.0 

53 

53 



20 

20 
14 



103 

12 
30 



34 

14 
13 



33 



45 



103 

74 

21 

6 



104 

79 

51 

21 

1 

6 



104 

10 



104 
104 



29 

11 
37.9 
11 
5 
6 
54.5 
18 



12 
18 

6 

33.3 

6 

6 
100.0 



21 
41 667 



11 

11 
5 



17 



17 
11 

12 
6 
6 



6 
13 372 



5 
40 300 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 55 



Table 18. Labor Force and Disability Characteristics of Persons: 1990— Con. 

[Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



LABOR FORCE STATUS 

Persons 16 years and over 

In labor force 

Percent of persons 16 years and over 

Civilian labor force 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Percent of civilian labor force 

Not in labor force 

Institutionalized persons 

Enrolled in school 

Noninstitutionalized persons 65 years and over, not 

enrolled in school 

Females 16 years and over 

In labor force 

Percent of females 16 years and over 

Civilian labor force 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Percent of civilian labor force 

With own children under 6 years 

In labor force 

With own children 6 to 17 years only 

In labor force 

Own children under 6 years in families and 

subfamilies 

All parents present in household in labor force 

Own children 6 to 17 years in families and 

subfamilies 

All parents present in household in labor force 

Persons 16 to 19 years 

Not enrolled in school 

Unemployed or not in labor force 

Not high school graduate 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Not in labor force 

OCCUPATION AND SELECTED INDUSTRIES 

Employed persons 16 years and over 

Executive, administrative, and managerial occupations 

Professional specialty occupations 

Technicians and related support occupations 

Sales occupations 

Administrative support occupations, including clerical 

Private household occupations 

Protective service occupations 

Service occupations, except protective and household 

Farming, forestry, and fishing occupations 

Precision production, craft, and repair occupations 

Machine operators, assemblers, and inspectors 

Transportation and material moving occupations 

Handlers, equipment cleaners, helpers, and laborers 

Construction 

Manufacturing 

Transportation, communications, and other utilities 

Wholesale and retail trade 

Finance, insurance, and real estate 

Business and repair services 

Professional and related services 

CLASS OF WORKER 

Employed persons 16 years and over 

Privote wage and salary workers 

Government workers 

Local government workers 

Self-employed workers 

WORK STATUS IN 1989 

Persons 16 years and over who worked in 
1989 

Usually worked 35 or more hours per week 

50 to 52 weeks 

40 to 49 weeks 

27 to 39 weeks 

Usually worked 1 to 34 hours per week, 40 to 52 weeks 

DISABILITY 

Civilian noninstitutionalized persons 16 to 64 

years 

With a mobility or self-care limitation 

With a mobility limitation 

In labor force 

With a self-care limitation 

With a work disability 

In labor force 

Prevented from working 

No work disability 

In labor force 

Civilian noninstitutionalized persons 65 years 

and over 

With a mobility or self-care limitation 

With a mobility limitation 

With a self-care limitation 



Florence city, Florence County— Con. 



Tract 3 (pt.) Tract 5 (pt.) Tract 6 (pt.) Tract 7 (pt.) Tract 8 (pt.) Tract 9 (pt.) Tract 10 (pt.) Tract 11 (pt.) Tract 12 (pt.) Tract 13 (pt.) 



WORKERS IN FAMILY IN 1989 
No workers 

Mean family income (dollars) 

1 worker 

Mean family income (dollars) 

2 or more workers 

Mean family income (dollars) 



242 

176 
72.7 
176 
160 
16 
9.1 
66 

29 

22 
153 

102 

66.7 

102 

86 

16 

15.7 

19 

19 

55 

55 

16 

16 

128 

128 
26 



160 

32 

7 
18 

26 

36 
29 

12 



62 
11 
23 
7 
13 
31 



160 

118 
42 



191 

156 
120 

22 
9 

18 



220 

7 
7 



7 
213 
176 

22 



6 
13 440 

18 
12 017 

73 
34 645 



761 


2 546 


3 838 


2 532 


1 706 


3 713 


2 554 


1 765 


594 


1 037 


2 299 


1 321 


793 


2 554 


1 620 


1 231 


78.1 


40.7 


59.9 


52.2 


46.5 


68.8 


63.4 


69.7 


594 


1 037 


2 299 


1 300 


793 


2 554 


1 620 


1 231 


581 


875 


2 073 


1 116 


770 


2 474 


1 581 


1 193 


13 


162 


226 


184 


23 


80 


39 


38 


2.2 


15.6 


9.8 


14.2 


2.9 


3.1 


2.4 


3 1 


167 


1 509 


1 539 


1 211 


913 


1 159 


934 


534 


— 


393 


- 


164 


332 


45 


_ 




26 


171 


385 


192 


49 


106 


76 


65 


37 


328 


464 


350 


370 


707 


400 


278 


400 


1 442 


2 253 


1 426 


921 


2 160 


1 411 


884 


293 


596 


1 248 


692 


379 


1 335 


712 


567 


73.3 


41.3 


55.4 


48.5 


41.2 


61.8 


50.5 


64.1 


293 


596 


1 248 


684 


379 


1 335 


712 


567 


293 


486 


1 136 


578 


366 


1 304 


694 


561 


- 


110 


112 


106 


13 


31 


18 


6 


- 


18.5 


9.0 


15.5 


3.4 


2.3 


2.5 


1.1 


97 


202 


369 


151 


101 


206 


161 


126 


82 


113 


213 


97 


80 


139 


90 


88 


129 


232 


466 


259 


61 


218 


211 


100 


101 


186 


366 


196 


49 


199 


142 


75 


123 


310 


542 


280 


188 


329 


195 


164 


89 


186 


319 


168 


145 


231 


92 


116 


211 


476 


1 111 


648 


188 


574 


485 


246 


153 


328 


840 


498 


142 


509 


292 


148 


78 


217 


484 


231 


60 


168 


116 


118 


36 


70 


71 


76 


16 


63 


20 


10 


7 


63 


59 


53 


16 


35 


7 


10 


7 


65 


48 


68 


16 


26 




3 


7 


7 


7 


15 


_ 




_ 




- 


16 


34 


5 


_ 


14 


_ 




— 


42 


7 


48 


16 


12 


- 


3 


581 


875 


2 073 


1 116 


770 


2 474 


1 581 


1 193 


88 


25 


89 


46 


64 


251 


271 


240 


84 


32 


99 


49 


90 


481 


462 


217 


33 


47 


39 


5 


81 


116 


84 


33 


86 


108 


146 


105 


74 


395 


319 


227 


131 


43 


212 


94 


90 


430 


190 


211 


- 


21 


29 


22 


_ 


_ 






- 


22 


28 


- 


16 


21 


21 


6 


64 


219 


601 


311 


188 


172 


106 


50 


- 


18 


17 


17 


17 


39 


6 


7 


51 


113 


186 


119 


89 


249 


50 


93 


13 


139 


386 


173 


29 


170 


27 


39 


19 


60 


137 


92 


17 


101 


27 


21 


12 


28 


104 


83 


15 


49 


18 


49 


60 


54 


155 


97 


78 


138 


40 


94 


48 


141 


492 


216 


78 


351 


188 


216 


28 


56 


182 


54 


22 


192 


85 


53 


125 


236 


445 


294 


158 


516 


326 


253 


83 


36 


111 


45 


85 


211 


174 


129 


13 


41 


53 


43 


24 


117 


57 


44 


216 


156 


492 


242 


201 


744 


598 


330 


581 


875 


2 073 


1 116 


770 


2 474 


1 581 


1 193 


463 


740 


1 624 


894 


610 


1 898 


1 156 


952 


118 


70 


363 


140 


105 


446 


239 


178 


34 


36 


129 


49 


30 


77 


35 


39 




55 


86 


77 


55 


121 


178 


63 


625 


1 092 


2 357 


1 288 


960 


2 637 


1 750 


1 301 


549 


730 


1 819 


1 038 


823 


2 148 


1 257 


1 046 


441 


354 


1 130 


582 


582 


1 608 


900 


705 


41 


185 


262 


197 


85 


236 


200 


134 


11 


40 


202 


47 


56 


164 


51 


115 


42 


146 


275 


167 


82 


293 


341 


187 


724 


1 744 


3 286 


1 941 


969 


2 794 


2 013 


1 475 


16 


506 


445 


344 


153 


168 


75 


137 


5 


303 


219 


147 


68 


43 


39 


33 


- 


- 


64 


44 


32 


5 


8 


16 


11 


468 


360 


296 


136 


142 


49 


137 


16 


465 


421 


255 


158 


197 


116 


86 


5 


48 


122 


53 


70 


64 


33 


23 


11 


417 


282 


194 


88 


133 


74 


63 


708 


1 279 


2 865 


1 686 


811 


2 597 


1 897 


1 389 


589 


936 


2 098 


1 197 


695 


2 339 


1 463 


1 196 


37 


409 


552 


406 


405 


874 


541 


290 


7 


185 


187 


133 


144 


193 


83 


83 


7 


145 


145 


115 


125 


179 


61 


59 


7 


140 


76 


82 


92 


125 


66 


63 


12 


141 


145 


107 


92 


161 


131 


114 


50 094 


7 266 


4 559 


4 940 


18 299 


48 607 


31 597 


27 790 


73 


232 


558 


298 


109 


340 


309 


74 


25 170 


10 323 


13 404 


16 527 


19 961 


24 575 


74 341 


43 035 


223 


264 


637 


337 


202 


642 


526 


417 


43 318 


25 299 


33 486 


27 065 


34 339 


49 305 


78 120 


75 415 



56 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 18. Labor Force and Disability Characteristics of Persons: 1990— Con. 

[Data based on sample and subject to sompling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Florence city, Florence County— Con. 



Tract 14 (pt.) Tract 15.01 (pt.) Tract 16.01 (pt.) 



Remainder of Florence County 



Tract 1 


Tract 2.01 (pt.) 


Tract 2.02 (pt.) 


3 256 


1 490 


2 716 


2 540 


1 062 


2 006 


78.0 


71.3 


73.9 


2 540 


1 047 


1 992 


2 484 


1 025 


1 925 


56 


22 


67 


2.2 


2.1 


3.4 


716 


428 


710 


174 


- 


_ 


151 


96 


104 


155 


83 


227 


1 705 


735 


1 499 


1 218 


458 


1 019 


71.4 


62.3 


68.0 


1 218 


458 


1 012 


1 180 


451 


960 


38 


7 


52 


3.1 


1.5 


5.1 


303 


142 


133 


239 


92 


105 


364 


162 


302 


299 


118 


238 


387 


190 


199 


297 


114 


164 


794 


400 


560 


648 


256 


385 


241 


133 


213 


19 


12 


33 


4 


- 


_ 


4 


- 


17 


- 


- 


17 



Tract 3 (pt.: 



Tract 4 



LABOR FORCE STATUS 

Persons 16 years and over 

In labor force 

Percent of persons 16 years and over 

Civilian labor force 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Percent of civilian labor force 

Not in labor force 

Institutionalized persons 

Enrolled in school 

Noninstitutionalized persons 65 years and over, not 

enrolled in school 

Females 16 years and over 

In labor force 

Percent of females 16 years and over 

Civilian labor force 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Percent of civilian labor force 

With own children under 6 years 

In labor force 

With own children 6 to 17 years only 

In labor force 

Own children under 6 years in families and 

subfamilies 

All parents present in household in labor force 

Own children 6 to 17 years in families and 

subfamilies 

All parents present in household in labor force 

Persons 16 to 19 years 

Not enrolled in school 

Unemployed or not in labor force 

Not high school graduate 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Not in labor force 

OCCUPATION AND SELECTED INDUSTRIES 

Employed persons 16 years and over 

Executive, administrative, and managerial occupations 

Professional specialty occupations 

Technicians and related support occupations 

Sales occupations 

Administrative support occupations, including clerical 

Private household occupations 

Protective service occupations 

Service occupations, except protective and household 

Farming, forestry, and fishing occupations 

Precision production, craft, and repair occupations 

Machine operators, assemblers, and inspectors 

Transportation and material moving occupations 

Handlers, equipment cleaners, helpers, and laborers 

Construction 

Manufacturing 

Transportation, communications, and other utilities 

Wholesale and retail trade 

Finance, insurance, and real estate 

Business and repair services 

Professional and related services 

CLASS OF WORKER 

Employed persons 16 years and over 

Private wage and salary workers 

Government workers 

Local government workers 

Self-employed workers 

WORK STATUS IN 1989 

Persons 16 years and over who worked in 
1989 

Usually worked 35 or more hours per week 

50 to 52 weeks. 

40 to 49 weeks 

27 to 39 weeks 

Usually worked 1 to 34 hours per week, 40 to 52 weeks 

DISABILITY 

Civilian noninstitutionalized persons 16 to 64 

years 

With a mobility or self-care limitation 

With a mobility limitation 

In labor force 

With a self-care limitation 

With a work disability 

In labor force 

Prevented from working 

No work disability 

In labor force 

Civilian noninstitutionalized persons 65 years 

and over 

With a mobility or self-care limitation 

With a mobility limitation 

With a self-care limitation 

WORKERS IN FAMILY IN 1989 

No workers 

Mean family income (dollars) 

1 worker 

Mean family income (dollars) 

2 or more workers 

Mean family income (dollars) 



2 850 

1 978 

69.4 

1 971 

1 915 

56 

2.8 

872 

143 

348 
1 509 

908 
60.2 
908 
857 
51 
5.6 
254 
173 
300 
258 

289 

213 

609 

474 
183 

14 
10 
14 
4 

10 



1 915 


485 


461 


37 


335 


261 


34 


20 


82 


106 


50 


31 


13 


35 


354 


116 


327 


197 


43 


628 


1 915 


1 383 


393 


108 


118 


2 152 


1 690 


1 340 


138 


83 


248 


2 429 


65 


19 


51 


83 


35 


32 


2 346 


1 886 


414 


74 


68 


53 


115 


30 372 


226 


46 664 


782 


71 185 



154 

86 
55.8 
86 
78 
8 
9.3 
68 

11 

37 
123 

69 

56.1 

69 

61 

8 

11.6 
34 
17 
17 
17 

61 

32 

54 

47 
20 



2 510 

1 764 

70.3 

1 764 

1 653 

111 

6.3 

746 

145 

231 
1 352 

883 
65.3 
883 
830 
53 
6.0 
204 
140 
295 
249 

246 

184 

688 

522 
250 

36 
16 
10 



3 072 

2 057 
67.0 

2 057 

1 938 
119 
5.8 

1 015 

195 

290 
1 587 

913 
57.5 
913 
823 
90 
9.9 
314 
229 
253 
180 

406 

274 

651 

385 
286 

84 

51 
60 
22 

38 



78 


2 484 


1 025 


1 925 


1 653 


1 938 


- 


381 


175 


286 


183 


88 


- 


570 


183 


339 


291 


186 


- 


168 


48 


95 


93 


68 


27 


331 


149 


270 


149 


230 


18 


493 


130 


383 


234 


330 


- 


- 


- 


13 


7 


_ 


- 


17 


6 


20 


51 


48 


17 


165 


109 


87 


189 


252 


- 


18 


12 


22 


12 


54 


- 


175 


97 


257 


202 


276 


16 


60 


42 


80 


101 


206 


- 


41 


21 


60 


106 


116 


- 


65 


53 


13 


35 


84 


9 


136 


37 


110 


80 


182 


25 


486 


192 


335 


318 


394 


- 


168 


62 


140 


102 


138 


24 


520 


231 


452 


316 


517 


- 


180 


83 


163 


45 


92 


10 


88 


25 


61 


56 


38 


10 


672 


306 


480 


555 


367 


78 


2 484 


1 025 


1 925 


1 653 


1 938 


71 


1 844 


818 


1 524 


1 178 


1 562 


- 


446 


129 


299 


391 


272 


- 


146 


62 


64 


124 


46 


7 


187 


78 


84 


72 


78 


83 


2 644 


1 115 


2 101 


1 838 


2 141 


69 


2 130 


898 


1 708 


1 516 


1 867 


53 


1 629 


679 


1 426 


1 047 


1 430 


8 


224 


109 


80 


205 


170 


- 


96 


20 


116 


144 


136 


8 


323 


123 


193 


140 


121 


117 


2 898 


1 365 


2 408 


2 227 


2 742 


33 


41 


75 


57 


313 


274 


7 


28 


26 


20 


56 


54 


- 


6 


- 


- 


20 


29 


33 


20 


58 


44 


282 


245 


26 


131 


92 


212 


171 


219 


8 


84 


31 


92 


54 


53 


18 


39 


61 


93 


95 


152 


91 


2 767 


1 273 


2 196 


2 056 


2 523 


78 


2 427 


989 


1 841 


1 658 


1 964 


37 


184 


no 


294 


283 


330 


7 


50 


34 


35 


70 


86 


- 


44 


26 


19 


38 


38 


7 


19 


8 


35 


54 


59 


18 


56 


26 


98 


87 


121 


2 917 


24 369 


10 952 


26 988 


13 217 


9 389 


41 


203 


201 


247 


207 


281 


12 887 


36 361 


79 247 


34 763 


29 045 


23 411 


17 


958 


368 


619 


640 


671 


37 689 


53 452 


75 355 


53 138 


42 846 


37 911 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 57 



Table 18. Labor Force and Disability Characteristics of Persons: 1990— Con. 

[Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



LABOR FORCE STATUS 

Persons 16 years and over 

In labor force 

Percent of persons 16 years and over 

Civilian labor force 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Percent of civilian labor force 

Not in labor force 

Institutionalized persons 

Enrolled in school 

Noninstitutionolized persons 65 years and over, not 

enrolled in school 

Females 16 years and over 

In labor force 

Percent of females 16 years and over 

Civilian labor force 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Percent of civilian labor force 

With own children under 6 years 

In labor force 

With own children 6 to 17 years only 

In labor force 

Own children under 6 years in families and 

subfamilies 

All parents present in household in labor force 

Own children 6 to 17 years in families and 

subfamilies 

All parents present in household in labor force 

Persons 16 to 19 years 

Not enrolled in school 

Unemployed or not in labor force 

Not high school graduate 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Not in labor force 

OCCUPATION AND SELECTED INDUSTRIES 

Employed persons 16 years and over 

Executive, administrative, and managerial occupations 

Professional specialty occupations 

Technicians and related support occupations 

Sales occupations 

Administrative support occupations, including clerical 

Private household occupations 

Protective service occupations 

Service occupations, except protective and household 

Farming, forestry, and fishing occupations 

Precision production, craft, and repoir occupations 

Machine operotors, assemblers, and inspectors 

Transportation and material moving occupations 

Handlers, equipment cleaners, helpers, and laborers 

Construction 

Manufacturing 

Transportation, communications, and other utilities 

Wholesale and retail trade 

Finance, insurance, and real estate 

Business and repair services 

Professional and related services 

CLASS OF WORKER 

Employed persons 16 years and over 

Private wage and salary workers 

Government workers 

Local government workers 

Self-employed workers 

WORK STATUS IN 1989 

Persons 16 years and over who worked in 

1989 

Usually worked 35 or more hours per week 

50 to 52 weeks 

40 to 49 weeks 

27 to 39 weeks 

Usually worked 1 to 34 hours per week, 40 to 52 weeks 

DISABILITY 

Civilian noninstitutionalized persons 16 to 64 
years 

With a mobility or self-care limitation 

With a mobility limitation 

In labor force 

With a self-care limitation 

With a work disability 

In labor force 

Prevented from working 

No work disability 

In labor force 

Civilian noninstitutionalized persons 65 years 

and over 

With a mobility or self-care limitation 

With a mobility limitation 

With a self-care limitation 

WORKERS IN FAMILY IN 1989 

No workers 

Mean family income (dollars) 

1 worker 

Mean family income (dollars) 

2 or more workers 

Mean family income (dollars) 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 5 (pt.) 



Tract 6 (pt.) 



Tract 7 (pt.) 



Tract 8 (pt.) 



3 324 

2 180 
65.6 



180 
074 
106 
4.9 
144 

500 



1 706 

1 190 

69.8 

1 190 

1 182 

8 

.7 

516 

94 



932 

570 
61.2 
570 
545 
25 
4.4 
362 

71 



217 

155 
71.4 
155 
145 

10 
6.5 

62 

22 



Tract 9 (pt.) 



526 

325 
61.8 
319 
297 
22 
6.9 
201 

18 



206 


164 


131 


_ 


74 


1 784 


921 


552 


105 


298 


1 045 


603 


315 


65 


184 


58.6 


65.5 


57.1 


61.9 


61.7 


1 045 


603 


315 


65 


184 


987 


603 


308 


65 


171 


58 


- 


7 


_ 


13 


5.6 


- 


2.2 


_ 


7.1 


216 


73 


109 


_ 


37 


135 


65 


65 


_ 


27 


322 


137 


128 


23 


64 


212 


118 


107 


17 


33 


314 


78 


205 


_ 


70 


209 


70 


138 


- 


39 


654 


289 


316 


37 


141 


443 


238 


249 


30 


83 


556 


140 


99 


4 


55 


62 


14 


29 


- 


16 


21 


- 


23 


- 


4 


25 


- 


23 


- 


10 


11 


- 


- 


- 


6 


14 


- 


23 


- 


4 


2 074 


1 182 


545 


145 


297 


155 


66 


9 


4 


_ 


191 


141 


52 


15 


39 


46 


60 


16 


7 




205 


182 


43 


12 


_ 


346 


251 


59 


21 


54 


4 


- 


- 


_ 


14 


43 


13 


4 


7 


18 


381 


148 


141 


46 


59 


29 


- 


- 


_ 


4 


338 


211 


101 


15 


19 


187 


55 


90 


10 


31 


70 


23 


- 


_ 


36 


79 


32 


30 


8 


23 


180 


59 


58 


_ 


25 


410 


193 


95 


17 


59 


68 


74 


- 


- 


20 


540 


323 


117 


40 


28 


190 


124 


24 


16 


29 


74 


55 


31 


_ 


13 


485 


280 


159 


68 


68 


2 074 


1 182 


545 


145 


297 


1 692 


972 


400 


97 


251 


290 


130 


137 


35 


41 


94 


18 


37 


14 


37 


92 


68 


8 


8 


5 


2 636 


1 181 


585 


161 


297 


1 790 


930 


487 


116 


205 


1 217 


689 


324 


104 


130 


204 


102 


99 


5 


30 


124 


61 


25 


7 


8 


419 


177 


62 


33 


46 


3 070 


1 491 


791 


201 


435 


214 


64 


60 


29 


70 


21 


42 


34 


29 


33 


- 


- 


5 


8 


6 


205 


49 


34 


5 


49 


211 


178 


61 


35 


71 


94 


44 


15 


14 


21 


111 


116 


46 


21 


50 


2 859 


1 313 


730 


166 


364 


2 038 


1 095 


545 


133 


287 


254 


215 


141 


16 


85 


68 


65 


42 


8 


25 


36 


56 


35 


_ 


20 


36 


31 


20 


8 


19 


61 


98 


53 


9 


38 


10 909 


21 824 


8 659 


8 256 


7 447 


342 


146 


131 


7 


81 


22 006 


26 333 


13 161 


14 500 


13 063 


637 


401 


177 


51 


64 


47 502 


43 475 


42 728 


48 761 


34 070 



Tract 10 (pt.) 



Tract 1 1 (pt.: 



Tract 12 (pt.) 



132 

82 

62.1 

82 

82 



50 



25 
68 

40 

58.8 

40 

40 



23 

14 

17 

17 

36 

27 



82 

25 



17 
21 



5 
7 

7 
7 
5 
28 
14 
7 
14 



82 

82 



87 

82 

65 

6 

6 

5 



107 

14 



14 
11 
5 
6 
96 
77 

25 



12 
42 510 

29 
17 688 

26 
44 171 



58 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 18. Labor Force and Disability Characteristics of Persons: 1990— Con. 

[Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 13 (pt.) 


Tract 14 (pt.) 


Tract 15.01 (pt.) 


Tract 15.02 


Tract 16.01 (pt.) 


Tract 16.02 


1 160 


661 


3 925 


3 278 


2 899 


3 008 


840 


474 


2 756 


2 144 


2 141 


1 940 


72.4 


71.7 


70.2 


65.4 


73.9 


64.5 


840 


474 


2 742 


2 133 


2 141 


1 924 


814 


462 


2 666 


2 039 


2 005 


1 849 


26 


12 


76 


94 


136 


75 


3.1 


2.5 


2.8 


4.4 


6.4 


3.9 


320 


187 


1 169 


1 134 


758 


1 068 


- 


- 


- 


- 


108 


120 


22 


40 


282 


232 


151 


182 


187 


72 


302 


362 


174 


317 


583 


314 


2 080 


1 779 


1 526 


1 572 


377 


201 


1 273 


1 034 


1 059 


815 


64.7 


64.0 


61.2 


58.1 


69.4 


51.8 


377 


201 


1 273 


1 034 


1 059 


815 


363 


201 


1 237 


992 


985 


772 


14 


- 


36 


42 


74 


43 


3.7 


- 


2.8 


4.1 


7.0 


5.3 


58 


73 


352 


220 


240 


300 


52 


51 


223 


115 


193 


182 


110 


88 


490 


434 


353 


275 


95 


74 


371 


311 


302 


207 


87 


139 


489 


332 


399 


312 


76 


96 


273 


150 


319 


180 


169 


152 


1 270 


924 


756 


717 


148 


117 


857 


641 


646 


539 


67 


57 


376 


303 


309 


261 


4 


8 


117 


43 


68 


21 


- 


- 


34 


7 


28 


14 


- 


8 


49 


21 


30 


21 


- 


8 


34 


14 


14 


7 


- 


- 


15 


- 


5 


5 


- 


_ 


_ 


7 


11 


9 


814 


462 


2 666 


2 039 


2 005 


1 849 


98 


60 


300 


176 


160 


134 


27 


149 


207 


137 


209 


162 


27 


28 


108 


22 


85 


53 


119 


85 


294 


256 


316 


259 


155 


14 


341 


340 


338 


253 


- 


7 


8 


14 


- 


6 


6 


- 


16 


12 


11 


10 


70 


14 


321 


239 


195 


147 


23 


- 


82 


62 


34 


104 


151 


86 


381 


348 


264 


314 


74 


- 


344 


274 


190 


212 


46 


3 


116 


107 


132 


123 


18 


16 


148 


52 


71 


72 


45 


32 


289 


131 


46 


133 


179 


82 


596 


474 


463 


485 


24 


3 


159 


189 


120 


96 


291 


107 


620 


536 


429 


522 


53 


25 


139 


116 


183 


100 


51 


8 


83 


62 


94 


68 


103 


158 


522 


331 


433 


274 


814 


462 


2 666 


2 039 


2 005 


1 849 


665 


352 


2 179 


1 707 


1 671 


1 514 


52 


79 


280 


232 


265 


213 


23 


7 


44 


60 


49 


40 


93 


27 


183 


84 


62 


108 


862 


469 


2 941 


2 332 


2 182 


2 020 


677 


370 


2 540 


1 866 


1 822 


1 709 


574 


250 


1 862 


1 419 


1 287 


1 363 


32 


75 


346 


211 


282 


153 


29 


15 


112 


52 


78 


64 


103 


52 


244 


200 


164 


220 


954 


589 


3 558 


2 842 


2 539 


2 482 


69 


86 


220 


173 


232 


446 


16 


62 


116 


68 


81 


77 


5 


41 


3 


10 


20 


41 


58 


80 


203 


155 


186 


420 


112 


44 


293 


228 


235 


218 


59 


19 


55 


58 


89 


64 


48 


25 


220 


140 


122 


144 


842 


545 


3 265 


2 614 


2 304 


2 264 


762 


455 


2 652 


2 024 


1 974 


1 787 


206 


72 


353 


425 


252 


390 


59 


27 


103 


117 


45 


159 


32 


21 


65 


112 


20 


108 


35 


21 


85 


78 


34 


97 


50 


13 


105 


132 


107 


78 


9 757 


24 182 


11 036 


11 749 


11 241 


12 777 


129 


60 


363 


330 


218 


338 


19 524 


38 089 


22 633 


22 823 


27 606 


22 618 


227 


145 


1 008 


734 


714 


631 


39 719 


50 655 


43 235 


42 686 


40 057 


43 218 



Tract 17 



Tract 18 



LABOR FORCE STATUS 

Persons 16 years and over 

In labor force 

Percent of persons 16 years and over 

Civilian labor force 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Percent of civilian labor force 

Not in labor force 

Institutionalized persons 

Enrolled in school 

Noninstitutionalized persons 65 years and over, not 

enrolled in school 

Females 16 years and over 

In labor force 

Percent of females 16 years and over 

Civilian labor force 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Percent of civilian labor force 

With own children under 6 years 

In labor force 

With own children 6 to 17 years only 

In labor force 

Own children under 6 years in families and 

subfamilies 

All parents present in household in labor force 

Own children 6 to 17 years in families and 

subfamilies 

All parents present in household in labor force 

Persons 16 to 19 years 

Not enrolled in school 

Unemployed or not in labor force 

Not high school graduate 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Not in labor force 

OCCUPATION AND SELECTED INDUSTRIES 

Employed persons 16 years and over 

Executive, administrative, and managerial occupations 

Professional specialty occupations 

Technicians and related support occupations 

Sales occupations 

Administrative support occupations, including clerical 

Private household occupations 

Protective service occupations 

Service occupations, except protective and household 

Farming, forestry, and fishing occupations 

Precision production, craft, ond repair occupations 

Machine operators, assemblers, and inspectors 

Transportation and material moving occupations 

Handlers, equipment cleaners, helpers, and laborers 

Construction 

Manufacturing 

Transportation, communications, and other utilities 

Wholesale and retail trade 

Finance, insurance, and real estate 

Business and repair services 

Professional and related services 

CLASS OF WORKER 

Employed persons 16 years and over 

Private wage and salary workers 

Government workers 

Local government workers 

Self-employed workers 

WORK STATUS IN 1989 

Persons 16 years and over who worked in 
1989 

Usually worked 35 or more hours per week 

50 to 52 weeks 

40 to 49 weeks 

27 to 39 weeks 

Usually worked 1 to 34 hours per week, 40 to 52 weeks 

DISABILITY 

Civilian noninstitutionalized persons 16 to 64 

years 

With a mobility or self-care limitation 

With a mobility limitation 

In labor force 

With a self-care limitotion 

With a work disability 

In labor force 

Prevented from working 

No work disability 

In labor force 

Gvilian noninstitutionalized persons 65 years 

and over 

With a mobility or self-care limitation 

With a mobility limitation 

With a self-care limitation 

WORKERS IN FAMILY IN 1989 

No workers 

Mean family income (dollars) 

1 worker 

Mean family income (dollars) 

2 or more workers 

Mean family income (dollars) 



1 482 

909 
61.3 
901 
844 
57 
6.3 
573 

97 

203 
786 

419 
53.3 
419 
386 

33 
7.9 
126 

85 
173 
128 

156 

103 

431 

295 
132 

23 
15 
10 
3 

7 



844 

55 

31 

11 

49 

118 

14 

48 

90 

36 

150 

167 

44 

31 

45 
320 

24 
130 

39 

66 
103 



844 

684 
133 
56 

11 



947 

809 

556 

123 

41 

58 



1 225 

91 
57 
14 
55 

179 
40 

131 
1 046 

815 

249 

40 
34 
25 



66 

9 805 

170 

21 329 

317 

33 407 



2 667 


1 785 


66.9 


1 781 


1 676 


105 


5.9 


882 


217 


361 


1 416 


850 


60.0 


850 


783 


67 


7.9 


158 


103 


360 


299 


218 


141 


693 


570 


254 


42 


11 


17 


10 


2 


5 


1 676 


119 


153 


47 


205 


189 


21 


12 


183 


147 


237 


198 


88 


77 


137 


446 


37 


407 


58 


34 


317 


1 676 


1 355 


193 


35 


103 


1 819 


1 491 


1 047 


138 


123 


158 


2 228 


329 


56 


13 


291 


164 


54 


105 


2 064 


1 661 


435 


139 


104 


80 


128 


8 837 


291 


22 860 


559 


39 836 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 59 



Table 18. Labor Force and Disability Characteristics of Persons: 1990— Con. 

[Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 19 



Tract 20 


Tract 22.01 


Tract 22.02 


3 163 


3 876 


2 443 


1 864 


2 307 


1 285 


58.9 


59.5 


52.6 


1 858 


2 307 


1 285 


1 739 


2 058 


1 197 


119 


249 


88 


6.4 


10.8 


6.8 


1 299 


1 569 


1 158 


63 


- 


16 


215 


255 


175 


364 


602 


400 


1 607 


2 268 


1 381 


818 


1 202 


622 


50.9 


53.0 


45.0 


818 


1 202 


622 


768 


1 068 


568 


50 


134 


54 


6.1 


11.1 


8.7 


237 


356 


175 


118 


239 


96 


275 


517 


259 


193 


375 


167 


469 


501 


301 


220 


326 


159 


805 


1 394 


631 


480 


855 


346 


281 


275 


219 


64 


16 


37 


47 


6 


21 


42 


10 


17 


6 


10 


- 


4 


- 


- 


32 


- 


17 


1 739 


2 058 


1 197 


78 


135 


101 


149 


128 


192 


29 


23 


40 


160 


242 


171 


163 


203 


134 


- 


18 


- 


32 


34 


5 


166 


261 


101 


151 


35 


58 


317 


337 


180 


279 


422 


109 


61 


127 


51 


154 


93 


55 


155 


165 


92 


513 


610 


237 


50 


110 


57 


349 


478 


239 


58 


79 


65 


101 


71 


37 


271 


300 


309 


1 739 


2 058 


1 197 


1 407 


1 654 


899 


174 


246 


214 


57 


122 


101 


150 


158 


84 


2 056 


2 357 


1 385 


1 715 


1 830 


1 082 


1 204 


1 261 


775 


235 


255 


127 


94 


145 


76 


164 


205 


88 


2 687 


3 198 


1 933 


299 


397 


137 


194 


157 


95 


62 


37 


12 


199 


343 


102 


415 


450 


240 


135 


177 


31 


264 


247 


197 


2 272 


2 748 


1 693 


1 680 


2 054 


1 172 


407 


678 


494 


100 


239 


105 


89 


202 


77 


41 


146 


75 


156 


264 


190 


11 524 


6 147 


9 540 


323 


514 


279 


17 855 


14 959 


30 364 


654 


643 


437 


31 419 


32 849 


51 381 



Tract 23 


Tract 24.98 


2 322 


2 833 


1 480 


1 740 


63.7 


61.4 


1 480 


1 740 


1 394 


1 621 


86 


119 


5.8 


6.8 


842 


1 093 


- 


64 


109 


124 


272 


368 


1 194 


1 495 


609 


788 


51.0 


52.7 


609 


788 


565 


725 


44 


63 


7.2 


8.0 


215 


200 


120 


174 


262 


282 


143 


185 


240 


360 


129 


293 


593 


756 


309 


498 


186 


284 


53 


87 


16 


47 


23 


42 


8 


13 


3 


2 


12 


27 


1 394 


1 621 


72 


123 


65 


134 


45 


9 


115 


185 


222 


202 


- 


49 


5 


41 


92 


81 


84 


146 


310 


206 


223 


293 


93 


82 


68 


70 


134 


189 


497 


511 


78 


45 


258 


268 


77 


58 


28 


19 


179 


211 


1 394 


1 621 


1 154 


1 306 


139 


164 


55 


56 


89 


145 


1 567 


1 785 


1 303 


1 480 


875 


978 


216 


208 


70 


113 


150 


128 


2 005 


2 362 


143 


236 


49 


83 


5 


10 


119 


186 


229 


264 


54 


59 


163 


183 


1 776 


2 098 


1 381 


1 642 


317 


407 


93 


145 


77 


121 


75 


68 


53 


184 


13 904 


9 801 


313 


213 


18 890 


21 079 


509 


582 


33 727 


32 145 



Tract 25 



Tract 26 



LABOR FORCE STATUS 

Persons 16 years and over 

In labor force 

Percent of persons 16 years and over 

Civilian labor force 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Percent of civilian labor force 

Not in labor force 

Institutionalized persons 

Enrolled in school 

Noninstitutionalized persons 65 years and over, not 

enrolled in school 

Females 16 years and over 

In labor force 

Percent of females 16 years and over 

Civilian labor force 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Percent of civilian labor force 

With own children under 6 years 

In labor force 

With own children 6 to 17 years only 

In labor force 

Own children under 6 years in families and 

subfamilies 

All parents present in household in labor force 

Own children 6 to 17 years in families and 

subfamilies 

All parents present in household in labor force 

Persons 16 to 19 years 

Not enrolled in school l 

Unemployed or not in labor force 

Not high school graduate 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Not in labor force 

OCCUPATION AND SELECTED INDUSTRIES 

Employed persons 16 years and over 

Executive, administrative, and managerial occupations 

Professional specialty occupations 

Technicians and related support occupations 

Sales occupations 

Administrative support occupations, including clerical 

Private household occupations 

Protective service occupations 

Service occupations, except protective and household 

Farming, forestry, and fishing occupations 

Precision production, craft, and repair occupations 

Machine operators, assemblers, and inspectors 

Transportation and material moving occupations 

Handlers, equipment cleaners, helpers, and laborers 

Construction 

Manufacturing 

Transportation, communications, and other utilities 

Wholesale and retail trade 

Finance, insurance, and real estate 

Business and repair services 

Professional and related services 

CLASS OF WORKER 

Employed persons 16 years and over 

Private wage and salary workers 

Government workers 

Local government workers 

Self-employed workers 

WORK STATUS IN 1989 

Persons 16 years and over who worked in 
1989 

Usually worked 35 or more hours per week 

50 to 52 weeks 

40 to 49 weeks 

27 to 39 weeks 

Usually worked 1 to 34 hours per week, 40 to 52 weeks 

DISABILITY 

Civilian noninstitutionalized persons 16 to 64 
years 

With a mobility or self-care limitation 

With a mobility limitation 

In labor force 

With a self-care limitation 

With a work disability 

In labor force 

Prevented from working 

No work disability 

In labor force 

Civilian noninstitutionalized persons 65 years 

and over 

With a mobility or self-care limitation 

With a mobility limitation 

With a self-care limitation 

WORKERS IN FAMILY IN 1989 

No workers 

Mean family income (dollars) 

1 worker 

Mean family income (dollars) 

2 or more workers 

Mean family income (dollars) 



4 429 

2 745 

62.0 

2 720 

2 608 

112 

4.1 

1 684 

279 

574 

2 369 

1 290 

54.5 

1 290 

1 219 

71 

5.5 

405 

200 

515 

431 

539 

262 

1 334 

940 
435 

144 
70 
78 
14 

64 



2 608 

168 
212 

53 
209 
316 

13 

36 
197 
138 
506 
517 

70 
173 

291 

1 099 

73 

391 
40 
91 

319 



2 608 

2 208 

201 

60 

130 



2 976 

2 474 

1 748 

285 

146 

211 



3 766 

193 

80 

21 

155 

426 

125 

273 

3 340 

2 543 

638 

230 
162 
135 



169 
12 352 

491 
19 893 

965 
44 880 



2 212 

1 412 

63.8 

1 412 

1 339 

73 

5.2 

800 

140 

316 
1 142 

637 
55.8 
637 
578 
59 
9.3 
197 
135 
245 
177 

273 

178 

604 

422 
218 

48 

37 

37 

6 

31 



1 339 


125 


80 


49 


119 


182 


6 


144 


124 


199 


232 


34 


45 


84 


450 


90 


185 


41 


65 


228 


1 339 


952 


173 


71 


175 


1 446 


1 201 


905 


121 


56 


138 


1 862 


171 


35 


7 


154 


152 


37 


103 


1 710 


1 341 


350 


100 


88 


52 


69 


10 591 


221 


18 089 


475 


38 770 



2 605 


1 509 


57.9 


1 506 


1 399 


107 


7.1 


1 096 


23 


205 


394 


1 487 


755 


50.8 


755 


685 


70 


9.3 


219 


155 


304 


219 


325 


223 


735 


540 


253 


30 


20 


8 


2 


4 


2 


1 399 


78 


117 


29 


170 


155 


12 


17 


247 


72 


183 


178 


53 


88 


100 


289 


98 


314 


52 


81 


263 


1 399 


1 094 


217 


82 


87 


1 519 


1 205 


819 


201 


82 


160 


2 124 


202 


107 


29 


164 


240 


37 


168 


1 884 


1 408 


455 


168 


123 


100 


160 


12 186 


317 


24 555 


443 


33 821 



60 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 19 Income and Poverty Status in 1989: 1990 

[Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Florence, SC 
MSA 



Florence County 



Total Florence city 



Totals for split tracts/BNA's in Florence County 



Tract 2.01 



Tract 2.02 



Tract 3 



Tract 5 



Tract 6 



Tract 7 



Tract i 



INCOME IN 1989 

Households 

Less than $5,000 

$5,000 to $9,999 

$10,000 to $14,999 

$15,000 to $24,999 

$25,000 to $34,999 

$35,000 to $49,999 

$50,000 to $74,999 

$75,000 to $99,999 

$100,000 or more 

Median (dollars) 

Mean (dollars) 

Families 

Median income (dollars) 

Males 15 years and over, with income 

Median income (dollars) 

Percent year-round full-time workers 

Median income (dollars) 

Females 15 years and over, with income 

Median income (dollars) 

Percent year-round full-time workers 

Median income (dollars) 

Per capita income (dollars) 

INCOME TYPE IN 1989 

Households 

With earnings 

Mean earnings (dollars) 

With Social Security income 

Mean Social Security income (dollars) 

With public assistance income 

Mean public assistance income (dollars) 

With retirement income 

Mean retirement income (dollars) 

MEAN FAMILY INCOME IN 1989 BY FAMILY TYPE 
Families (dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

No own children under 18 years (dollars) 

Married-couple families (dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

No own children under 18 years (dollars) 

Female householder, no husband present 

(dollars) - 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

No own children under 18 years (dollars) 

POVERTY STATUS IN 1989 
All Income Levels In 1989 

Families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Married-couple families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Unrelated individuals for whom poverty status is 
determined 

Nonfamily householder 

65 years and over 

Persons for whom poverty status is determined _ 
Persons under 18 years 

Related children under 18 years 

Related children 5 to 17 years 

Persons 65 years and over 

Persons 75 years and over 

Income In 1989 Below Poverty Level 

Families 

Percent below poverty level 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Married-couple families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Unrelated individuals 

Nonfamily householder 

65 years and over 

Persons 

Percent below poverty level 

Persons under 18 years 

Related children under 18 years 

Related children 5 to 17 years 

Persons 65 years and over 

Persons 75 years and over 

Ratio of income in 1989 to poverty level: 

Persons below 50 percent of poverty level 

Persons below 125 percent of poverty level 

Persons below 200 percent of poverty level 



39 998 

4 099 
4 916 
3 996 



39 998 



7 438 
6 245 
6 805 
4 452 
1 096 

951 
24 264 
31 197 
30 155 
28 718 

35 860 
16 534 
55.0 
23 987 
39 021 

8 514 
35.1 

14 964 

11 007 



39 998 

32 068 

32 490 

10 419 

6 559 

4 575 

3 167 

4 539 
8 960 



35 703 

34 706 

36 684 

41 895 

42 322 
41 488 

16 909 

13 121 
20 924 



099 
916 
996 
438 
245 
805 
452 
096 
951 
24 264 
31 197 
30 155 
28 718 

35 860 
16 534 

55.0 

23 987 

39 021 

8 514 

35.1 
14 964 

11 007 



39 998 

32 068 

32 490 

10 419 

6 559 

4 575 

3 167 

4 539 
8 960 



35 703 

34 706 

36 684 

41 895 

42 322 
41 488 

16 909 

13 121 
20 924 



10 968 

1 194 

1 309 

1 236 

1 762 

1 637 

1 736 

1 227 

418 

449 

24 906 

34 503 

7 472 
31 048 

9 206 

16 956 

49.1 

27 170 

11 060 

8 792 
30.3 

16 206 

12 831 



10 968 

8 429 

35 115 



40 924 

38 033 
43 289 

52 128 

53 965 
50 808 

17 118 

11 040 
23 546 



30 155 


30 155 


7 472 


23 580 


23 580 


5 597 


16 810 


16 810 


3 894 


6 433 


6 433 


1 666 


22 319 


22 319 


4 983 


18 529 


18 529 


3 962 


11 541 


11 541 


2 253 


4 326 


4 326 


936 


6 657 


6 657 


2 177 


4 238 


4 238 


1 425 


4 562 


4 562 


1 471 


1 851 


1 851 


662 


12 516 


12 516 


4 515 


9 843 


9 843 


3 496 


4 049 


4 049 


1 528 


111 850 


111 850 


28 703 


32 253 


32 253 


7 687 


32 174 


32 174 


7 643 


23 854 


23 854 


5 467 


12 064 


12 064 


3 999 


4 092 


4 092 


1 479 


4 794 


4 794 


1 331 


15.9 


15.9 


17.8 


2 304 


2 304 


731 


3 488 


3 488 


989 


1 601 


1 601 


508 


1 788 


1 788 


358 


822 


822 


175 


958 


958 


174 


389 


389 


65 


2 784 


2 784 


924 


1 386 


1 386 


540 


2 371 


2 371 


791 


1 143 


1 143 


433 


4 490 


4 490 


1 448 


3 210 


3 210 


916 


1 899 


1 899 


587 


22 500 


22 500 


6 266 


20.1 


20.1 


21.8 


8 530 


8 530 


2 360 


8 467 


8 467 


2 326 


6 Oil 


6 Oil 


1 531 


3 377 


3 377 


920 


1 398 


1 398 


342 


9 797 


9 797 


3 034 


29 468 


29 468 


8 168 


47 826 


47 826 


12 203 



764 

9 
51 
52 
107 
95 
129 
195 
32 
94 

41 190 
62 896 

616 
52 049 

769 

25 917 

59.8 

42 262 
659 

11 967 

41.0 

20 867 

22 521 



764 

715 

56 784 

79 

8 029 

11 

10 569 
62 

10 074 



72 758 

81 082 
63 876 
81 448 

92 537 
70 360 

30 590 

33 689 
27 421 



616 

543 

329 

116 

506 

439 

253 

85 

91 

85 

57 

31 

179 

148 
9 

2 125 

610 
610 

451 

110 
17 



15 

2.4 
15 
10 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
9 
9 
4 

44 

26 
9 

118 

5.6 

31 
31 
25 
14 
9 

39 
169 
463 



1 378 

35 

99 

78 

280 

177 

366 

220 

93 

30 

35 526 

39 085 
975 

40 373 

1 194 

24 734 

69.9 

31 042 

1 301 

11 185 

45.0 

17 232 

15 763 



1 378 

1 194 

38 629 

303 

9 805 

25 

1 913 

175 

10 922 



45 544 

45 629 
45 470 
49 510 

48 991 

49 970 

19 659 

22 438 
17 403 



975 

798 

489 

129 

820 

681 

385 

109 

125 

87 

89 

14 

525 

403 
80 

3 376 

780 
780 
610 
306 
45 



41 

4.2 

27 

21 

8 

6 

6 



35 

21 

21 

8 

56 

27 

8 

171 

5.1 
39 
39 
22 



1 233 

44 
102 
133 
224 
213 
309 
152 

49 

7 

30 663 

33 158 
1 031 

34 142 

1 145 

17 686 

57.2 

24 632 

1 278 

10 986 
39.9 

15 906 

11 069 



1 233 

1 067 

33 860 

255 



48 
103 
177 
146 



36 285 

39 102 
33 673 
39 824 

43 692 
36 366 

18 633 

20 503 
16 640 



1 031 

852 
543 
195 
841 
719 
412 
123 
157 
105 
113 
68 

245 

202 
80 



80 
310 
663 



700 

083 
081 
851 
305 
39 



78 

7.6 
24 
58 
45 
29 

18 
12 
49 

24 
40 
33 

53 

27 
12 

371 

10.0 
135 
133 

84 
38 

13 

139 
621 

1 175 



1 371 

97 

127 

150 

294 

274 

236 

150 

18 

25 

25 568 

33 405 

1 040 

27 535 

1 437 

13 764 

49.1 

21 793 

1 475 

7 355 

34.7 

13 561 

11 182 



1 371 

1 187 

35 225 

264 

5 657 

115 

3 885 

40 

14 730 



36 971 

28 178 
47 594 
43 356 

33 197 
53 036 

16 638 

17 081 
15 538 



1 040 

930 
635 
242 
787 
727 
411 
153 
219 
174 
195 
79 

459 

331 

111 

3 551 

1 004 

1 004 

722 

254 

76 



146 

14.0 
89 
139 
66 
55 
37 
48 
24 
83 
44 
83 
42 

163 

98 
39 

681 

19.2 
283 
283 
191 
51 
25 

241 

872 

1 379 



1 128 

57 

70 

83 

173 

210 

321 

186 

23 

5 

33 578 

33 673 

953 

38 375 

1 044 

22 627 

63.2 

27 734 

1 135 

10 781 

41.4 

16 125 

12 401 



1 128 

925 

34 571 

239 

9 881 

65 

4 036 

144 

11 806 



37 267 

40 652 
34 932 
39 821 

44 063 
36 608 

22 391 

14 002 
26 014 



953 

766 
419 
135 
796 
635 
353 
121 
126 
100 
58 
14 

208 

175 
90 

3 091 

723 
723 
549 
252 

52 



42 

4.4 
5 
6 

31 



11 

5 
6 

76 

51 
24 

179 

5.8 

8 
8 
8 
51 
19 

121 
279 
695 



1 394 

273 

389 

213 

194 

131 

106 

54 

24 

10 

10 748 

17 793 

998 

13 095 

1 334 

5 939 

24.3 

16 488 

1 828 

4 633 
19.4 

14 082 

5 234 



1 394 

970 

20 315 
492 

4 806 
440 

3 286 
129 

5 352 



19 884 

19 618 

20 219 
29 769 

37 988 
22 870 

14 042 

10 884 
19 549 



998 

662 
689 
335 
355 
212 
210 
87 
557 
394 
439 
226 

764 

396 
229 

4 397 

1 446 

1 446 
991 
550 
214 

432 

43.3 

234 

350 

187 

75 

18 

42 

15 

336 

208 

300 

164 

479 

203 

138 

2 106 

47.9 
842 
842 
554 
242 
94 

990 

2 481 

3 201 



1 781 


308 


357 


285 


269 


229 


199 


95 


27 


12 


14 034 


20 629 


1 407 


16 152 


1 457 


10 781 


42.8 


16 676 


1 946 


6 792 


31.3 


12 524 


6 481 


1 781 


1 424 


21 199 


514 


5 209 


439 


2 398 


219 


6 040 


22 839 


19 272 


26 350 


31 645 


30 713 


32 354 


14 776 


10 961 


19 465 



1 407 

1 056 
933 
376 
639 
518 
370 
134 
700 
491 
516 
230 

473 

374 
204 

5 689 

1 896 

1 886 

1 406 

568 

174 



482 

34.3 

291 

381 

183 

138 

75 

80 

37 

339 

216 

301 

146 

222 

159 

118 

2 027 

35.6 
896 
886 
615 
196 
71 

979 

2 464 

3 640 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 61 



Table 19 Income and Poverty Status in 1989: 1990 -Con. 

[Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text) 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Totals for split tracts/BNA's in Florence County— Con. 



Tract 9 



Tract 10 



Tract 1 1 



Tract 12 



Tract 13 



Tract 14 



Tract 15.01 



Tract 16.01 



Florence city, Florence County 



Tract 2.01 

(pt.) Tract 2.02 (pt.) 



INCOME IN 1989 

Households 

Less than $5,000 

$5,000 to $9,999 - 

$10,000 to $14,999 

$15,000 to $24,999 

$25,000 to $34,999 - 

$35,000 to $49,999 

$50,000 to $74,999 

$75,000 to $99,999 

$100,000 or more 

Median (dollars) 

Mean (dollars) 

Families 

Median income (dollars) 

Mules 15 years and over, with income 

Median income (dollars) 

Percent year-round full-time workers 

Median income (dollars) 

Females 15 years and over, with income 

Median income (dollars) 

Percent year-round full-time workers 

Median income (dollars) 

Per capita income (dollars) 

INCOME TYPE IN 1989 

Households 

With earnings 

Mean earnings (dollars) 

With Social Security income 

Mean Social Security income (dollars) 

With public assistance income 

Mean public assistance income (dollars) 

With retirement income 

Mean retirement income (dollars) 

MEAN FAMILY INCOME IN 1989 BY FAMILY TYPE 
Families (dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars). 

No own children under 18 years (dollars) 

Married-couple families (dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

No own children under 18 years (dollars) 

Female householder, no husband present 

(dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

No own children under 18 years (dollars) 

POVERTY STATUS IN 1989 
All Income Levels In 1989 

Families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Married-couple families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Unrelated individuals for whom poverty status is 

determined 

Nonfamily householder 

65 years and over 

Persons for whom poverty status is determined . 
Persons under 18 years 

Related children under 18 years 

Related children 5 to 17 years 

Persons 65 years and over 

Persons 75 years and over 

Income In 1989 Below Poverty Level 

Families 

Percent below poverty level 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Married-couple families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Unrelated individuals 

Nonfamily householder 

65 years and over 

Persons 

Percent below poverty level 

Persons under 18 years 

Related children under 18 years 

Related children 5 to 17 years 

Persons 65 years and over 

Persons 75 years and over 

Ratio of income in 1989 to poverty level: 

Persons below 50 percent of poverty level 

Persons below 125 percent of poverty level 

Persons below 200 percent of poverty level 



1 300 

263 
249 
262 
214 

176 
90 

41 

5 

12 540 

16 937 

925 

14 228 

1 107 

8 379 

35.6 

15 551 
1 399 
5 244 

22.4 
11 347 

5 451 



1 300 

965 
17 970 

450 
5 226 

281 
1 988 

146 
5 985 



19 563 

20 819 
18 500 
26 566 

29 240 
23 483 

13 455 

10 087 
15 413 



874 

75 
156 

90 
150 
214 
125 

41 
7 

16 
21 250 

25 424 
403 

26 680 

684 

17 805 

51.8 

24 773 

792 

9 302 

28.8 

14 655 

11 454 



874 

581 
28 334 

315 
7 353 

130 
3 445 

182 
6 176 



26 788 

20 990 
30 528 
32 010 

27 400 
34 260 

18 709 

14 247 
23 996 



2 185 

173 
211 
255 
509 
400 
309 
232 
38 
58 

24 009 
32 047 

1 143 
31 186 

1 465 

19 682 
58.3 

25 482 

2 034 
11 878 

37.1 
17 500 

15 313 



2 185 

1 668 
30 936 

736 

7 644 

78 

2 788 
262 

10 781 



41 851 

26 354 
51 407 
47 685 

35 283 
53 474 

23 118 

12 333 

36 721 



1 408 

64 

51 

88 

162 

197 

332 

205 

131 

178 

40 545 

58 290 

1 033 

47 201 

1 187 

30 136 

53.2 

38 214 

1 240 

13 508 

26.9 

19 688 

24 192 



1 408 

1 126 

53 995 

446 

9 126 

36 

6 861 

248 

17 459 



68 125 

81 634 

60 459 
71 729 

91 145 

61 103 

40 523 

19 323 
54 761 



1 478 

81 

103 

122 

271 

258 

306 

189 

73 

75 

1 119 

1 630 



1 Oil 

36 617 

1 375 

20 126 

56.7 

26 380 

1 351 

12 075 

37.0 

17 845 

17 497 



1 478 

1 177 

42 532 

428 

7 989 

34 

3 666 

203 

14 786 

49 281 

40 331 
55 093 
55 189 

46 045 
61 136 

24 856 

16 878 
28 468 



1 701 

85 

72 

34 

196 

211 

373 

464 

168 

98 

45 530 

50 827 
1 341 

51 478 

1 647 

32 156 

63.8 

40 943 

1 517 

13 714 

35.6 

22 689 

18 998 



1 701 

1 371 

51 561 

466 

9 425 

61 

4 133 

274 

11 852 



59 396 

66 987 

52 170 
61 359 

69 265 

53 336 

33 760 

33 601 
33 868 



1 801 

162 

176 

122 

348 

219 

469 

237 

49 

19 

28 832 

32 643 

1 476 

35 000 

1 731 

19 559 

65.0 

25 345 

1 722 

8 909 

42.8 

14 550 

10 604 



1 801 

1 554 
34 492 

297 

5 319 

156 

2 602 
174 

8 388 



35 878 

35 590 

36 279 
39 857 

39 831 
39 896 

18 575 

12 923 
23 937 



1 414 

79 

110 

181 

283 

272 

261 

168 

37 

23 

26 406 

30 616 

1 115 

28 972 

1 305 

19 023 

54.4 

25 109 

1 436 

10 206 

43.9 

14 431 

10 491 



1 414 

1 196 
32 455 

279 

6 492 

88 

2 717 
159 

6 453 



33 223 

32 311 

34 648 
36 875 

38 915 
34 260 

14 828 

13 570 
18 995 



925 


403 


1 143 


1 033 


1 on 


1 341 


1 476 


1 115 


21 


11 


544 


276 


842 


807 


792 


1 170 


1 292 


925 


21 


5 


583 


165 


464 


402 


410 


685 


943 


716 


21 


5 


189 


92 


229 


143 


191 


278 


406 


294 


_ 




422 


247 


839 


916 


817 


1 217 


1 213 


874 


8 


11 


306 


193 


618 


718 


634 


1 083 


1 112 


736 


8 


5 


260 


81 


273 


344 


326 


628 


757 


497 


8 


5 


77 


64 


118 


125 


165 


266 


342 


166 


_ 




449 


142 


251 


112 


154 


87 


228 


194 


_ 




207 


75 


179 


89 


126 


65 


168 


142 


_ 


_ 


285 


84 


162 


53 


56 


46 


165 


179 


_ 


_ 


107 


28 


90 


13 


16 


7 


52 


88 


- 


- 


449 


581 


1 245 


444 


551 


424 


406 


377 


62 




375 


471 


1 042 


375 


467 


360 


325 


299 


44 


_ 


147 


227 


368 


143 


159 


170 


83 


108 


- 


- 


3 944 


1 736 


4 510 


3 379 


3 531 


4 591 


5 492 


4 052 


110 


35 


1 220 


397 


911 


733 


686 


1 229 


1 801 


1 291 


20 


6 


1 220 


384 


911 


733 


679 


1 206 


1 790 


1 291 


20 


6 


903 


223 


614 


548 


466 


867 


1 360 


936 


20 


6 


491 


405 


874 


566 


496 


486 


353 


289 


_ 


12 


149 


247 


384 


190 


144 


119 


146 


91 


- 


12 


311 


51 


123 


48 


61 


21 


193 


109 






33.6 


12.7 


10.8 


4.6 


6.0 


1.6 


13.1 


9.8 


_ 


_ 


148 


21 


67 


25 


27 


7 


133 


58 


_ 


_ 


229 


35 


77 


25 


27 


- 


153 


94 


_ 


_ 


96 


15 


48 


14 


16 


- 


99 


50 


_ 


_ 


72 


8 


53 


30 


41 


21 


86 


28 


_ 


_ 


42 


8 


26 


12 


12 


7 


56 


20 


_ 


_ 


51 


- 


7 


12 


12 


- 


50 


20 


_ 


_ 


12 


- 


- 


6 


6 


- 


43 


7 


_ 


_ 


217 


43 


62 


18 


10 


_ 


86 


66 


_ 




100 


13 


41 


13 


5 


- 


65 


23 


_ 


_ 


172 


35 


62 


13 


5 


- 


82 


59 


_ 


_ 


84 


15 


48 


8 


- 


- 


44 


28 


- 


- 


213 


169 


217 


59 


122 


106 


142 


63 


5 




179 


97 


164 


48 


88 


83 


121 


47 




_ 


105 


61 


89 


29 


44 


48 


53 


47 


- 


- 


1 436 


303 


591 


202 


290 


145 


905 


474 


5 




36.4 


17.5 


13.1 


6.0 


8.2 


3.2 


16.5 


11.7 


4.5 


_ 


584 


83 


176 


48 


69 


13 


383 


240 


_ 


_ 


584 


70 


176 


48 


62 


- 


372 


240 


_ 


_ 


405 


33 


130 


31 


27 


- 


230 


172 


_ 


_ 


183 


68 


158 


49 


87 


68 


120 


62 


_ 


_ 


55 


41 


58 


23 


23 


6 


82 


30 


- 


- 


625 


146 


338 


73 


130 


78 


332 


162 


5 




2 078 


458 


835 


262 


446 


179 


1 155 


708 


5 


_ 


2 881 


807 


1 511 


536 


775 


442 


2 041 


1 375 


29 


12 



65 



11 
26 
28 



33 594 

33 760 

21 
39 519 

51 

26 094 

56.9 

34 531 

53 

14 250 

41.5 

26 500 

19 870 



65 

65 
33 693 



41 667 

41 667 



46 000 

46 000 



11 
6 
5 



14 792 

25 612 

11 

14 792 

11 

4 792 
45.5 

40 476 
12 

5 000 



8 058 



11 

5 

40 300 

6 

7 788 


6 
5 584 


25 612 

40 300 
13 372 
25 612 

40 300 
13 372 



62 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 19. Income and Poverty Status in 1989: 1990-Con. 

(Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text) 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Florence city, Florence County— Con. 



Tract 3 (pt.) Tract 5 (pt.) Tract 6 (pt.) Tract 7 (pt.) Tract 8 (pt.) Tract 9 (pt.) Tract 10 (pt.) Tract 1 1 (pt.) Tract 12 (pt.) Tract 13 (pt.) 



INCOME IN 1989 

Households 

Less than $5,000 — 

$5,000 to $9,999 

$10,000 to $14,999 

$15,000 to $24,999 

$25,000 to $34,999 

$35,000 to $49,999. 

$50,000 to $74,999 

$75,000 to $99,999 

$100,000 or more -- 

Median (dollars) 

Mean (dollars) 

Families 

Median income (dollars) 

Males 15 years and over, with income 

Median income (dollars) 

Percent year-round full-time workers 

Median income (dollars) 

Females 15 years and over, with income 

Median income (dollars) 

Percent year-round full-time workers 

Median income (dollars) 

Per capita income (dollars) 

INCOME TYPE IN 1989 

Households 

With earnings 

Mean earnings (dollars) 

With Social Security income 

Mean Social Security income (dollars) 

With public assistance income 

Mean public assistance income (dollars) 

With retirement income 

Mean retirement income (dollars) 

MEAN FAMILY INCOME IN 1989 BY FAMILY TYPE 
Families (dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

No own children under 18 years (dollars) 

Married-couple families (dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

No own children under 18 years (dollars) 

Female householder, no husband present 

(dollars)— 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

No own children under 18 years (dollars) 

POVERTY STATUS IN 1989 
All Income Levels In 1989 

Families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Married-couple families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Unrelated individuals for whom poverty status is 
determined 

Nonfomily householder 

65 years and over 

Persons for whom poverty status is determined . 

Persons under 18 years 

Related children under 18 years 

Related children 5 to 17 years 

Persons 65 years and over 

Persons 75 years and over 

Income In 1989 Below Poverty Level 

Families 

Percent below poverty level 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Married-couple families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Unrelated individuals 

Nonfomily householder 

65 years and over 

Persons 

Percent below poverty level 

Persons under 18 years 

Related children under 18 years 

Related children 5 to 17 years 

Persons 65 years and over 

Persons 75 years and over 

Ratio of income in 1989 to poverty level: 

Persons below 50 percent of poverty level 

Persons below 125 percent of poverty level 

Persons below 200 percent of poverty level 



102 



24 


15 


35 


22 


6 


28 864 


29 276 


97 


28 295 


89 


17 396 


67.4 


23 214 


131 


12 031 


45.8 


14 048 


8 273 


102 


96 


28 113 


22 


8 181 


13 


6 116 


29 134 


28 482 


30 025 


30 661 


33 600 


26 507 


13 225 


14 494 


10 052 



97 

85 
62 
13 
70 
64 
41 

7 
21 
15 
21 

6 

12 

5 
5 

372 

144 
144 
128 
22 



333 

5 

16 

66 

51 

132 

45 

13 

5 

38 711 

38 718 
308 

39 219 

339 

24 312 
71.7 

27 466 
324 

13 750 
61.1 

18 309 

12 514 



333 

314 

36 609 

25 

8 538 

6 

2 445 

32 

21 673 



39 281 

42 379 
34 492 

43 228 

45 103 
39 665 

17 360 

13 261 
19 475 



308 

283 
195 
84 
261 
243 
171 
76 
47 
40 
24 



25 

25 

1 074 

341 

341 

229 

37 

7 



5 

1.6 
5 



10 
.9 



83 
144 



37 
202 



971 

221 

296 

175 

133 

55 

50 

29 

6 

6 

9 115 

14 741 

637 

II 519 

995 

4 872 

16.6 

16 518 

1 353 

4 141 

14.0 

13 165 

4 534 



971 

633 

16 519 

372 

4 585 
348 

3 336 
90 

5 480 



15 853 

13 971 
17 967 
24 519 

35 689 

17 682 

11 930 

7 839 

18 643 



637 

381 

411 

202 

187 

75 

90 

32 

412 

284 

311 

170 

678 

334 
201 

2 946 

868 
868 
585 
409 
173 



341 

53.5 

192 

268 

143 

66 

18 

33 

10 

271 

174 

235 

133 

428 

169 
120 

1 696 

57.6 
632 
632 
404 
192 
82 

821 

1 887 

2 275 



1 688 

308 

332 

268 

256 

224 

186 

82 

20 

12 

13 912 

20 059 

1 340 

15 469 

1 355 

10 455 
41.3 

16 332 
1 853 
6 702 

30.8 
12 515 

6 242 



1 688 

1 348 
20 792 

496 

5 242 

425 

2 303 
208 

5 755 



21 993 

19 040 
25 157 
30 841 

30 713 
30 953 

14 512 

10 429 
19 578 



1 340 

998 
910 
376 
590 
478 
358 
134 
688 
479 
511 
230 

447 

348 
196 

5 439 

1 859 

1 849 

1 369 

552 

174 



473 

35.3 

291 

381 

183 

129 

75 

80 

37 

339 

216 

301 

146 

214 

151 
110 

2 003 

36.8 
896 
886 
615 
188 
71 

979 

2 432 

3 581 



1 073 

223 
186 
223 
187 
152 
69 
28 

5 

12 810 

16 809 

742 

14 688 

923 

8 447 

34.7 

15 809 
1 143 

4 990 
22.5 

11 185 

5 360 



1 073 

794 

8 250 

366 

5 051 
215 

1 791 
91 

6 065 



19 642 

21 524 
18 110 
28 106 

30 824 
25 240 

12 505 

10 080 

13 850 



742 

453 
468 
156 
337 
265 
207 

70 
356 
162 
228 

81 

405 

331 

141 

3 214 

991 
991 
732 

406 
120 

243 

32.7 

114 

170 

78 

52 

36 

36 

12 

169 

72 

128 

66 

195 

161 
105 

1 145 

35.6 
436 
436 
295 
167 
50 

474 

1 712 

2 357 



874 

75 
156 

90 
150 
214 
125 

41 
7 

16 
21 250 

25 424 
403 

26 680 

684 

17 805 

51.8 

24 773 

792 

9 302 

28.8 

14 655 

11 454 



874 

581 

28 334 
315 

7 353 
130 

3 445 
182 

6 176 



26 788 

20 990 
30 528 
32 010 

27 400 
34 260 

18 709 

14 247 
23 996 



403 

276 
165 
92 
247 
193 
81 
64 
142 
75 
84 
28 

581 

471 
227 

1 736 

397 
384 
223 
405 
247 



51 

12.7 

21 

35 

15 

8 



43 

13 
35 
15 

169 

97 
61 

303 

17.5 
83 
70 
33 
68 
41 

146 
458 
807 



2 185 

173 
211 
255 
509 
400 
309 
232 
38 
58 

24 009 
32 047 

1 143 
31 186 

1 465 

19 682 
58.3 

25 482 

2 034 
11 878 

37.1 
17 500 

15 313 



2 185 

1 668 
30 936 

736 

7 644 

78 

2 788 
262 

10 781 



41 851 

26 354 
51 407 
47 685 

35 283 
53 474 

23 118 

12 333 

36 721 



1 143 

842 
464 
229 
839 
618 
273 
118 
251 
179 
162 
90 

1 245 

1 042 
368 

4 510 

911 
911 
614 
874 
384 



123 

10.8 
67 
77 
48 
53 
26 
7 

62 

41 
62 
48 

217 

164 

89 

591 

13.1 
176 
176 
130 
158 
58 

338 

835 

1 511 



1 341 

64 

51 

80 

140 

191 

314 

192 

131 

178 

41 295 

59 583 

966 

47 991 

1 117 

31 168 

52.8 

41 099 

1 178 

13 717 

26.3 

20 054 

24 863 



1 341 

1 071 

55 489 

421 

9 115 

28 

8 684 

228 

17 841 



70 602 

86 048 
62 098 
73 977 

95 022 
62 705 

43 158 

21 147 
56 508 



966 

758 

371 

137 

863 

683 

321 

119 

98 

75 

45 

13 



375 

143 

3 194 

680 
680 
512 
541 
178 

48 

5.0 
25 
25 
14 
30 
12 
12 

6 
18 
13 
13 

8 

59 

48 
29 

202 

6.3 
48 
48 
31 
49 
23 

73 
239 
485 



850 

53 

12 

34 

129 

123 

210 

162 

56 

71 

39 891 

53 762 

605 

43 562 

840 

22 024 
52.0 

37 202 
818 

14 385 
32.8 

19 292 

21 364 



850 

676 

54 517 

225 

8 850 

13 

4 701 

170 

15 605 



62 481 

45 978 
71 978 
67 246 

50 055 
77 519 

34 526 

18 200 
36 859 



605 

466 

225 

131 

524 

411 

196 

117 

56 

38 

11 

4 

301 

245 
95 

144 

426 
419 
287 
290 
61 



16 

2.6 

10 
16 
10 
6 



91 

70 
33 

162 

7.6 
49 
42 
16 
33 
6 

96 
251 
340 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 63 



Table 19 Income and Poverty Status in 1989: 1990 -Con. 

[Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Florence city, Florence County— Con. 



Tract 14 (pt.) Tract 15.01 (pt.) Tract 16.01 (pt.) 



Remainder of Florence County 



Tract 1 


Tract 2.01 


(pt.) 


Tract 2.02 (pt.) 


Tract 3 (pt.) 


1 488 




699 


1 367 


1 131 


30 




9 


35 


44 


81 




51 


99 


102 


54 




52 


72 


109 


127 




96 


280 


209 


229 




69 


177 


178 


356 




101 


361 


287 


443 




195 


220 


146 


127 




32 


93 


49 


41 




94 


30 


7 


45 852 


43 


207 


35 539 


31 042 


45 344 


65 


606 


39 193 


33 508 


1 217 




595 


964 


934 


48 958 


53 


832 


40 433 


35 183 


1 472 




718 


1 183 


1 056 


30 632 


25 


714 


24 761 


17 713 


68.7 




60.0 


70.2 


56.3 


37 783 


44 9C 


30 962 


24 858 


1 461 




606 


1 289 


1 147 


13 059 


11 


600 


11 315 


10 903 


41.8 




40.9 


45.4 


39.2 


20 253 


20 


561 


17 232 


16 402 


15 992 


22 665 


15 843 


11 380 


1 488 




699 


1 367 


1 131 


1 400 




650 


1 189 


971 


43 847 


59 


093 


38 622 


34 428 


156 




79 


297 


233 


8 843 


8 02 


9 846 


7 839 


20 




11 


25 


48 


2 231 


10 


569 


1 913 


5 103 


127 




62 


169 


164 


12 650 


10 074 


11 1)2 


7 228 


49 263 


73 856 


45 772 


37 027 


50 141 


83 


869 


45 688 


40 454 


48 243 


63 


876 


45 845 


33 976 


51 584 


82 018 


49 835 


40 656 


52 466 


94 056 


49 105 


44 855 


50 498 


70 360 


50 482 


37 055 


27 670 


30 590 


19 659 


19 468 


21 428 


33 


689 


22 438 


21 869 


33 551 


27 421 


17 403 


17 205 



Tract 4 



INCOME IN 1989 

Households 

Less than $5,000 — 

$5,000 to $9,999 — 

$10,000 to $14,999 

$15,000 to $24,999 

$25,000 to $34,999 

$35,000 to $49.999 

$50,000 to $74,999 

$75,000 to $99,999 

$100,000 or more 

Median (dollars) 

Mean (dollars) 

Families 

Median income (dollars) 

Males 15 years and over, with income 

Median income (dollars) 

Percent year-round full-time workers 

Median income (dollars) 

Females 15 years and over, with income 

Median income (dollars) 

Percent year-round full-time workers 

Median income (dollars) 

Per capita income (dollars) 

INCOME TYPE IN 1989 

Households 

With earnings 

Mean earnings (dollars) 

With Social Security income 

Mean Social Security income (dollars) - 

With public assistance income 

Mean public assistance income (dollars) 

With retirement income 

Mean retirement income (dollars) 

MEAN FAMILY INCOME IN 1989 BY FAMILY TYPE 
Families (dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

No own children under 18 years (dollars) 

Married-couple families (dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

No own children under 18 years (dollars) 

Female householder, no husband present 

(dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

No own children under 18 years (dollars) 

POVERTY STATUS IN 1989 
All Income Levels In 1989 

Families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Married-couple families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Unrelated individuals for whom poverty status is 

determined 

Nonfamily householder 

65 years and over 

Persons for whom poverty status is determined. 

Persons under 18 years 

Related children under 18 years 

Related children 5 to 17 years 

Persons 65 years and over 

Persons 75 years and over 

Income In 1989 Below Poverty Level 

Families 

Percent below poverty level 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Married-couple families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Unrelated individuals 

Nonfamily householder 

65 years and over 

Persons 

Percent below poverty level 

Persons under 18 years 

Related children under 18 years 

Related children 5 to 17 years 

Persons 65 years and over 

Persons 75 years and over 

Ratio of income in 1989 to poverty level: 

Persons below 50 percent of poverty level 

Persons below 125 percent of poverty level 

Persons below 200 percent of poverty level 



1 354 


44 


30 


34 


158 


156 


286 


401 


147 


98 


48 565 


55 008 


1 123 


53 236 


1 306 


35 733 


67.6 


42 491 


1 266 


13 947 


36.1 


22 807 


20 478 


1 354 


1 112 


54 740 


373 


10 104 


25 


4 878 


242 


11 974 


62 071 


71 900 


53 864 


64 007 


74 183 


54 987 


31 055 


31 521 


30 775 



1 123 

971 

536 

211 

1 030 

910 

493 

199 

56 

39 

32 

7 

270 

231 

122 

3 669 

929 
915 
692 
414 
94 



14 

1.2 



14 



51 

37 
21 

77 

2.1 

4 



49 

96 

242 



121 

28 
35 
31 
8 
10 



9 399 


12 698 


76 


11 400 


31 


20 536 


54.8 


25 375 


103 


9 514 


35.0 


12 222 


5 469 


121 


66 


18 267 


39 


6 200 


27 


1 209 


6 


5 328 


16 073 


16 039 


16 215 


31 406 


50 000 


7 500 


9 182 


6 390 


23 840 



76 

58 
61 
35 
16 

9 
9 

50 

39 
42 

25 

45 

45 
30 

260 

115 
115 
70 
37 
29 



17 

22.4 
6 
17 
17 



17 

6 
17 
17 

19 

19 
19 

72 

27.7 
36 
36 

7 
19 
11 

53 
133 
218 



1 217 

1 125 

681 

270 

1 096 

1 010 

613 

265 

101 

95 

68 

5 

319 

271 

15 

4 167 

1 222 

1 222 

912 

184 

48 



48 

3.9 
48 
48 

9 
28 
28 
28 

9 
20 
20 
20 

45 

35 
7 

238 

5.7 
104 
104 
93 

7 
7 

72 
371 
525 



595 

522 

308 

116 

498 

431 

245 

85 

91 

85 

57 

31 

117 

104 

9 

2 015 

590 
590 
431 

110 
17 



15 

2.5 
15 
10 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
9 
9 
4 

39 

26 
9 

113 

5.6 

31 
31 
25 
14 
9 

34 
164 
434 



964 

793 

484 

129 

809 

676 

380 

109 

125 

87 

89 

14 

525 

403 
80 

341 

774 
774 
604 
294 
33 



41 

4.3 

27 

21 

8 

6 

6 



35 

21 

21 

8 

56 

27 
8 

171 

5.1 
39 
39 
22 
8 



80 
310 
651 



934 

767 

481 

182 

771 

655 

371 

116 

136 

90 

92 

62 

233 

197 
75 

3 328 

939 
937 
723 
283 
39 



78 

8.4 
24 
58 
45 
29 

18 
12 
49 

24 
40 
33 

53 

27 
12 

371 

11.1 

135 

133 

84 

38 

13 

139 

538 

1 031 



1 449 


198 


83 


184 


318 


268 


268 


102 


12 


16 


22 969 


25 879 


1 073 


28 260 


1 337 


16 787 


66.5 


21 531 


1 274 


9 496 


42.5 


15 887 


9 690 


1 449 


1 184 


28 511 


199 


6 244 


117 


3 618 


117 


7 739 


30 897 


27 164 


34 597 


33 874 


30 324 


37 098 


16 081 


15 224 


17 399 



1 073 

877 
589 
286 
872 

739 

451 
219 
165 

115 
119 
67 

579 

376 

119 

4 059 

1 087 

1 087 

740 

330 

74 



128 

11.9 
50 
98 
69 
38 
10 
27 
17 
90 
40 
71 
52 

246 

173 
29 

677 

16.7 
215 
215 
111 
61 
19 

379 

924 

1 652 



64 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 19 Income and Poverty Status in 1989: 1990 -Con. 

[Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms ond meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 5 (pt.) 



Tract 6 (pt.) 



Tract 7 (pt.) 



Tract 8 (pt.) 



Tract 9 (pt.) 



Tract 10 (pt.) 



Tract 11 (pt.) 



Tract 12 (pt.) 



INCOME IN 1989 

Households 

Less than $5,000 

$5,000 to $9,999 

$10,000 to $14,999 

$15,000 to $24,999 

$25,000 to $34,999 

$35,000 to $49,999 

$50,000 to $74,999 

$75,000 to $99,999 

$100,000 or more 

Median (dollars) 

Mean (dollars) 

Families 

Median income (dollars) 

Moles 15 years and over, with income 

Median income (dollars) 

Percent year-round full-time workers 

Median income (dollars) 

Females 15 years and over, with income 

Median income (dollars) 

Percent year-round full-time workers 

Median income (dollars) 

Per capita income (dollars) 

INCOME TYPE IN 1989 

Households 

With earnings 

Mean earnings (dollars) 

With Social Security income 

Mean Social Security income (dollars) 

With public assistance income 

Mean public assistance income (dollars) 

With retirement income 

Mean retirement income (dollars) 

MEAN FAMILY INCOME IN 1989 BY FAMILY TYPE 
Families (dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

No own children under 18 years (dollars) 

Married-couple families (dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

No own children under 18 years (dollars) 

Female householder, no husband present 

(dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

No own children under 18 years (dollars) 

POVERTY STATUS IN 1989 
All Income Levels In 1989 

Families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Married-couple families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Unrelated individuals for whom poverty status is 

determined 

Nonfamily householder 

65 years and over 

Persons for whom poverty status is determined . 

Persons under 18 years 

Related children under 18 years 

Related children 5 to 17 years 

Persons 65 years and over 

Persons 75 years and over 

Income In 1989 Below Poverty Level 

Families 

Percent below poverty level 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Married-couple families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Unrelated individuals 

Nonfamily householder 

65 years and over 

Persons 

Percent below poverty level 

Persons under 18 years 

Related children under 18 years 

Related children 5 to 17 years 

Persons 65 years and over 

Persons 75 years and over 

Ratio of income in 1989 to poverty level: 

Persons below 50 percent of poverty level 

Persons below 125 percent of poverty level 

Persons below 200 percent of poverty level 



1 371 

97 

127 

150 

294 

274 

236 

150 

18 

25 

25 568 

33 405 

1 040 

27 535 

1 437 

13 764 

49.1 

21 793 

1 475 

7 355 

34.7 

13 561 

11 182 



1 371 

1 187 

35 225 

264 

5 657 

115 

3 885 

40 

14 730 



36 971 

28 178 
47 594 
43 356 

33 197 
53 036 

16 638 

17 081 
15 538 



1 040 

930 
635 
242 
787 
727 
411 
153 
219 
174 
195 
79 

459 

331 

111 

3 551 

1 004 

1 004 

722 

254 

76 



146 

14.0 
89 
139 
66 
55 
37 
48 
24 
83 
44 
83 
42 

163 

98 
39 

681 

19.2 
283 
283 
191 

51 
25 

241 

872 

1 379 



795 

52 
70 
67 
107 
159 
189 
141 
10 

30 781 

31 560 
645 

37 909 

705 

22 131 

59.1 

28 083 

811 

9 533 

33.5 

14 828 

12 341 



795 

611 

33 523 

214 

10 038 

59 

4 198 

112 

8 987 



36 305 

39 054 
35 052 
38 158 

43 029 
35 850 

25 385 

14 540 
29 570 



645 

483 

224 

51 

535 

392 

182 

45 

79 

60 

34 

6 

183 

150 

90 

2 017 

382 
382 
320 
215 
45 



37 

5.7 



6 
31 



76 

51 
24 

169 

8.4 



46 

19 

121 
242 
493 



423 

52 

93 

38 

61 

76 

56 

25 

18 

4 

19 728 

24 799 

361 

22 981 

339 

11 250 

46.9 

14 844 

475 

7 183 

34.7 

16 331 

6 874 



423 

337 

27 444 

120 

5 492 

92 

3 097 

39 

5 058 



26 997 

28 306 
24 977 
35 613 

39 782 
30 685 

20 044 

18 839 
22 555 



361 

281 
278 
133 
168 
137 
120 

55 
145 
110 
128 

56 

86 

62 
28 

1 451 

578 
578 
406 
141 
41 



91 

25.2 

42 

82 

44 

9 

9 

5 

65 

34 
65 
31 

51 

34 
18 

410 

28.3 

210 

210 

150 

50 

12 

169 
594 
926 



93 



25 


17 


13 


5 


13 


13 


7 


18 906 


30 972 


67 


34 750 


102 


17 222 


63.7 


17 454 


93 


10 375 


41.9 


12 562 


11 692 


93 


76 


28 421 


18 


4 312 


14 


5 280 


11 


11 433 


39 740 


51 484 


38 793 


41 332 


41 332 


29 910 


51 484 


14 500 



67 

58 
23 

49 

40 
12 

12 

12 
5 



26 

26 
8 

250 

37 
37 
37 
16 



9 

13.4 



24 

9.6 



227 

40 

63 
39 
27 
24 

21 
13 



11 193 
17 539 

183 

12 279 

184 

8 026 

40.2 

13 654 
256 

6 176 

21.9 

11 842 



67 



32 
59 



5 



227 

171 

16 668 

84 

5 985 

66 

2 633 

55 

5 854 



19 244 

18 240 

20 236 

20 460 

24 069 
14 483 

17 093 

10 110 

21 918 



183 

91 
115 
33 
85 
41 
53 
7 
93 
45 
57 
26 

44 

44 
6 

730 

229 

229 

171 

85 

29 



68 

37.2 
34 
59 
18 
20 
6 
15 

48 

28 
44 
18 



291 

39.9 
148 
148 

110 
16 
5 

151 
366 
524 



8 


22 


6 


18 


13 


28 958 


32 411 


67 


28 958 


70 


23 375 


60.0 


22 000 


62 


11 333 


37.1 


11 917 


12 576 


67 


55 


24 889 


25 


9 323 


8 


480 


20 


13 106 


32 411 


32 792 


32 083 


35 140 


40 411 


31 100 


22 078 


10 886 


37 000 



67 

49 
31 

6 
53 
35 
23 

6 
14 
14 

8 



185 

53 
53 
36 
25 

12 



23 
51 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 65 



Table 19 Income and Poverty Status in 1989: 1990 -Con. 

[Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 13 (pt.) 



Tract 14 (pt.) Tract 15.01 (pt.) 



Tract 15.02 Tract 16.01 (pt.) 



Tract 16.02 



Tract 17 



Tract 18 



INCOME IN 1989 

Households 

Less than $5,000 

$5,000 to $9,999 

$10,000 to $14,999 — — 

$15,000 to $24,999 — 

$25,000 to $34,999 

$35,000 to $49,999 — 

$50,000 to $74,999 — 

$75,000 to $99,999 — 

$100,000 or more 

Median (dollars) 

Mean (dollars) 

Families 

Median income (dollars) 

Males 15 years and over, with income 

Median income (dollars) 

Percent year-round full-time workers 

Median income (dollars) 

Females 15 years and over, with income 

Median income (dollars) 

Percent year-round full-time workers 

Median income (dollars) 

Per capita income (dollars) 

INCOME TYPE IN 1989 

Households 

With earnings 

Mean earnings (dollars) 

With Social Security income 

Mean Social Security income (dollars) - 

With public assistance income 

Mean public assistance income (dollars) 

With retirement income 

Mean retirement income (dollars) 

MEAN FAMILY INCOME IN 1989 BY FAMILY TYPE 
Families (dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

No own children under 18 years (dollars) 

Married-couple families (dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

No own children under 18 years (dollars) 

Female householder, no husband present 

(dollars). 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

No own children under 18 years (dollars) 

POVERTY STATUS IN 1989 
All Income Levels In 1989 

Families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Married-couple families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Unrelated individuals for whom poverty status is 
determined 

Nonfamily householder 

65 years and over 

Persons for whom poverty status is determined . 

Persons under 18 years 

Related children under 18 years 

Related children 5 to 17 years 

Persons 65 years and over 

Persons 75 years and over 

Income In 1989 Below Poverty Level 

Families 

Percent below poverty level 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Married-couple families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Unrelated individuals 

Nonfomily householder 

65 years and over 

Persons 

Percent below poverty level 

Persons under 18 years 

Related children under 18 years 

Related children 5 to 17 years 

Persons 65 years and over 

Persons 75 years and over 

Ratio of income in 1989 to poverty level: 

Persons below 50 percent of poverty level 

Persons below 125 percent of poverty level 

Persons below 200 percent of poverty level 

66 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



628 

28 

91 

88 

142 

135 

96 

27 

17 

4 

22 000 

25 210 

406 

25 214 

535 

16 369 

63.9 

21 200 

533 

9 384 

43.5 

15 347 

11 519 



628 

501 

26 361 

203 

7 034 

21 

3 026 

33 

10 568 



29 613 

33 280 
26 778 
33 625 

39 808 
28 960 

19 330 

16 653 
21 256 



406 

326 

185 

60 

293 

223 

130 

48 

98 

88 

45 

12 

250 

222 

64 

1 387 

260 
260 
179 
206 
83 



45 

11.1 
17 
11 
6 
35 
12 
6 
6 
10 
5 
5 

31 

18 
11 

128 

9.2 

20 
20 
11 
54 
17 

34 
195 
435 



347 

41 
42 

38 
55 
87 
63 
21 

34 688 

34 510 

218 

46 538 

341 
22 235 

49.0 
26 544 

251 

12 604 
33.1 

19 632 

13 109 



347 

259 

37 909 

93 

6 700 

36 

3 616 

32 

10 932 



45 618 

49 430 
38 350 

46 773 

50 809 

37 798 

38 648 

36 720 
40 235 



218 

199 
149 
67 
187 
173 
135 
67 
31 
26 
14 



154 

129 

48 

922 

300 

291 

175 

72 

25 



7 

3.2 
7 



55 

46 
27 

68 

7.4 
9 



27 
6 

29 
83 

200 



1 801 

162 

176 

122 

348 

219 

469 

237 

49 

19 

28 832 

32 643 

1 476 

35 000 

1 731 

19 559 

65.0 

25 345 

1 722 

8 909 

42.8 

14 550 

10 604 



1 801 

1 554 

34 492 

297 



5 



319 
156 
602 
174 
388 



35 878 

35 590 

36 279 
39 857 

39 831 
39 896 

18 575 

12 923 
23 937 



1 476 

1 292 

943 

406 

1 213 

1 112 

757 

342 

228 

168 

165 

52 

406 

325 
83 

5 492 

1 801 

1 790 

1 360 

353 

146 



193 

13.1 
133 
153 
99 
86 
56 
50 
43 
86 
65 
82 
44 

142 

121 
53 

905 

16.5 
383 
372 
230 
120 
82 

332 

1 155 

2 041 



1 470 

111 

169 

64 

361 

214 

319 

201 

19 

12 

27 557 

30 471 
1 196 

31 434 

1 431 

18 430 

59.3 

23 820 

1 465 

8 844 

38.4 

13 426 

10 366 



1 470 



1 190 


31 499 


409 


6 512 


123 


2 734 


153 


7 336 


33 791 


35 706 


31 602 


36 507 


39 475 


33 004 


20 678 


16 657 


23 534 



1 196 

952 

692 

168 

981 

826 

562 

144 

171 

90 

94 

24 

341 

274 

116 

4 425 

1 333 

1 333 

1 027 

425 

164 



127 

10.6 
53 
82 
16 
61 
21 
32 
6 
57 
23 
41 
10 

112 

80 

61 

528 

11.9 
166 
166 
135 
122 
52 

261 

812 

1 616 



1 293 

51 

75 

150 

275 

262 

261 

159 

37 

23 

27 801 

32 292 

1 039 

29 889 

1 274 

18 955 

54.4 

25 064 

1 333 

10 287 

44.6 

14 624 

10 847 



1 293 

1 130 

33 284 
240 

6 539 

61 

3 385 

153 

6 497 

34 477 

33 914 

35 307 

36 977 

38 708 

34 758 

16 789 

16 388 

17 948 



1 039 

867 
655 
259 
858 
727 
488 
166 
144 
103 
137 
63 

332 

254 
78 

3 792 

1 176 

1 176 

866 

252 

62 



92 

8.9 
52 
77 
33 
28 
20 
20 
7 
49 
17 
42 
11 

44 

28 
28 

402 

10.6 
204 
204 
165 
43 
19 

109 

575 

1 157 



1 286 

82 

169 

71 

254 

322 

170 

171 

27 

20 

26 509 

31 016 

1 047 

28 815 

1 333 

16 473 

63.6 

21 990 

1 244 

7 854 

40.8 

16 048 

10 381 



1 286 

1 102 
30 846 

366 
5 812 

166 
3 242 

153 
8 922 



34 300 

35 089 
33 531 
38 042 
38 698 
37 279 

20 664 

14 299 
23 733 



1 047 

864 
561 
253 
811 
721 
455 
210 
209 
124 
93 
36 

314 

239 
92 

3 785 

1 055 

1 055 

820 

390 

153 

115 

11.0 

58 
60 
32 
64 

40 
20 
16 
48 

15 
37 
16 

127 

114 
50 

525 

13.9 
129 
129 

77 
112 
51 

80 
699 

1 347 



677 

83 
85 
78 

157 
93 

132 

42 

7 

18 672 

23 417 
553 

24 519 

633 

15 102 

54.5 

20 516 

634 

7 148 

33.3 

13 750 

7 954 



677 

523 

25 507 

207 

4 791 

91 

5 147 

92 

6 616 



26 877 

29 988 
23 545 

30 050 

33 470 
26 598 

11 724 

14 700 
8 278 



553 

415 

311 

122 

436 

338 

224 

80 

82 

50 

64 

42 

132 

124 
76 

2 Oil 

587 
587 
444 
249 
79 



96 

17.4 
26 
39 
26 
52 

13 

6 

44 

26 
26 
20 

71 

71 
53 

377 

18.7 
95 
95 
65 

129 
52 

56 
546 
937 



1 281 


182 


204 


146 


184 


212 


193 


108 


23 


29 


21 211 


26 186 


978 


25 945 


1 108 


15 661 


55.7 


21 035 


1 182 


7 454 


35.8 


14 080 


9 654 


1 281 


1 001 


28 578 


359 


5 411 


129 


2 254 


90 


8 462 


30 728 


31 247 


30 225 


36 593 


37 499 


35 714 


12 418 


10 584 


14 360 



978 

726 
521 
143 
721 
589 
363 

94 
212 
111 
135 

49 

335 

303 
158 

3 481 

944 
942 
756 
435 
158 



175 

17.9 
71 

117 
32 
75 
24 
37 
3 
94 
41 
74 
29 

175 

162 

109 

791 

22.7 
272 
270 
227 
162 
79 

324 
902 
556 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 19 Income and Poverty Status in 1989: 1990 -Con. 

[Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 19 



Tract 20 


Tract 22.01 


Trad 22.02 


1 373 


1 947 


1 200 


120 


437 


207 


202 


413 


199 


177 


197 


108 


382 


397 


244 


246 


222 


72 


156 


158 


171 


77 


83 


138 


7 


16 


10 


6 


24 


51 


19 287 


12 981 


17 586 


22 634 


18 507 


30 871 


1 133 


1 421 


906 


21 236 


17 293 


21 860 


1 383 


1 416 


904 


11 875 


10 467 


15 397 


48.5 


48.0 


49.9 


15 916 


16 696 


25 433 


1 285 


2 046 


1 083 


7 365 


5 755 


8 018 


41.3 


28.4 


29.9 


11 182 


11 825 


13 065 


7 239 


6 359 


11 258 


1 373 


1 947 


1 200 


1 123 


1 354 


838 


23 262 


20 452 


34 739 


259 


638 


369 


6 375 


4 662 


6 671 


191 


555 


219 


3 936 


3 049 


3 240 


152 


193 


148 


6 831 


9 136 


7 341 


24 813 


21 417 


36 134 


24 044 


20 480 


31 803 


25 567 


22 366 


39 845 


27 930 


30 356 


47 642 


28 088 


30 365 


48 531 


27 796 


30 346 


47 075 


13 324 


13 113 


11 928 


12 256 


9 663 


8 543 


14 687 


16 369 


17 054 


1 133 


1 421 


906 


835 


960 


613 


618 


917 


466 


246 


306 


189 


861 


690 


611 


672 


577 


479 


429 


410 


254 


163 


108 


102 


214 


659 


259 


123 


364 


107 


140 


479 


188 


57 


189 


78 


322 


655 


367 


240 


526 


294 


101 


299 


137 


4 267 


5 699 


3 248 


1 308 


1 987 


959 


1 306 


1 987 


959 


905 


1 577 


683 


407 


678 


494 


143 


288 


158 


221 


516 


259 


19.5 


36.3 


28.6 


92 


202 


62 


148 


401 


179 


89 


157 


85 


114 


94 


90 


63 


34 


25 


56 


73 


23 


34 


22 


10 


96 


384 


156 


29 


163 


28 


83 


309 


143 


46 


135 


66 


134 


403 


173 


91 


311 


109 


78 


217 


46 


1 100 


2 402 


1 099 


25.8 


42.1 


33.8 


476 


1 055 


416 


474 


1 055 


416 


284 


827 


290 


163 


352 


132 


63 


215 


57 


398 


921 


594 


1 466 


2 879 


1 324 


2 570 


3 952 


1 749 



Tract 23 



Tract 24.' 



Tract 25 



Tract 26 



INCOME IN 1989 

Households 

Less than $5,000 

$5,000 to $9,999 

$10,000 to $14,999 

$15,000 to $24,999 

$25,000 to $34,999 

$35,000 to $49,999 

$50,000 to $74,999 

$75,000 to $99,999 

$100,000 or more 

Median (dollars) 

Mean (dollars) 

Families 

Median income (dollars) 

Males 15 years and over, with income 

Median income (dollars) 

Percent year-round full-time workers 

Median income (dollars) 

Females 15 years and over, with income 

Median income (dollars) 

Percent year-round full-time workers 

Median income (dollars) 

Per capita income (dollars) 

INCOME TYPE IN 1989 

Households 

With earnings 

Mean earnings (dollars) 

With Social Security income 

Mean Social Security income (dollars) 

With public assistance income 

Mean public assistance income (dollars) 

With retirement income 

Mean retirement income (dollars) 

MEAN FAMILY INCOME IN 1989 BY FAMILY TYPE 
Families (dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

No own children under 18 years (dollars) 

Married-couple families (dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

No own children under 18 years (dollars) 

Female householder, no husband present 

(dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

No own children under 18 years (dollars) 

POVERTY STATUS IN 1989 
All Income Levels In 1989 

Families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Married-couple families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Unrelated individuals for whom poverty status is 

determined 

Nonfamily householder 

65 years and over 

Persons for whom poverty status is determined. 

Persons under 18 years 

Related children under 18 years 

Related children 5 to 17 years 

Persons 65 years and over 

Persons 75 years and over 

Income In 1989 Below Poverty Level 

Families 

Percent below poverty level 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Married-couple families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Unrelated individuals 

Nonfamily householder 

65 years and over 

Persons 

Percent below poverty level 

Persons under 18 years 

Related children under 18 years 

Related children 5 to 17 years 

Persons 65 years and over 

Persons 75 years and over 

Ratio of income in 1989 to poverty level: 

Persons below 50 percent of poverty level 

Persons below 125 percent of poverty level 

Persons below 200 percent of poverty level 



2 073 


253 


268 


251 


439 


289 


322 


171 


26 


54 


20 294 


29 550 


1 625 


24 190 


1 825 


15 363 


54.1 


22 526 


1 978 


8 108 


37.8 


14 583 


9 996 


2 073 


1 663 


32 440 


560 


5 797 


255 


3 338 


220 


5 279 


33 947 


30 565 


37 722 


39 206 


35 733 


43 217 


15 949 


11 405 


20 231 



1 625 

1 275 
969 
340 
1 237 
1 013 
701 
238 
336 
230 
233 



552 

448 
224 

6 103 

1 919 

1 919 

1 464 

638 

227 

279 

17.2 
149 
210 
87 
147 
70 
81 
31 
130 
79 
127 
56 

248 

194 
153 

1 361 

22.3 
494 
494 
378 
236 
91 

535 
1 713 
3 005 



1 094 


104 


158 


143 


208 


256 


138 


71 


12 


4 


21 067 


23 580 


875 


26 177 


1 020 


15 575 


54.8 


19 770 


909 


8 250 


34.4 


12 774 


8 364 


1 094 


935 


23 690 


290 


5 418 


111 


3 852 


90 


8 162 


27 219 


26 081 


28 348 


28 937 


27 492 


30 559 


15 987 


9 711 


18 261 



875 

726 

488 

178 

743 

641 

413 

135 

94 

58 

48 

19 

250 

219 

107 

3 081 

860 
854 
660 
317 
71 

108 

12.3 
83 
79 
22 
71 
59 
56 
17 
37 
24 
23 
5 

109 

99 
41 

482 

15.6 
146 
146 
123 

57 
26 

187 

791 

1 526 



1 250 


169 


222 


127 


253 


238 


144 


77 


14 


6 


19 273 


22 803 


979 


21 789 


1 184 


13 272 


51.5 


17 312 


1 236 


6 795 


29.3 


13 269 


7 433 


1 250 


951 


24 494 


360 


5 795 


186 


2 627 


161 


6 969 


25 538 


25 170 


25 945 


28 618 


28 944 


28 267 


14 738 


13 372 


16 424 



979 

719 
583 
209 
741 
590 
416 
168 
172 

80 
125 

37 

374 

271 
132 

3 789 

1 145 

1 145 

846 

407 

144 

210 

21.5 
68 

151 
49 

105 
32 
65 
17 
91 
31 
72 
28 

168 

119 
77 

1 197 

31.6 
474 
474 
353 
156 
40 

791 

1 470 

2 101 





973 




115 




132 




94 




190 




155 




202 




65 




8 




12 


22 


351 


26 829 




765 


25 


276 




958 


14 


151 




59.2 


21 


425 




897 


7 


292 




34.9 


13 


912 


8 414 




973 




774 


29 


754 




276 


5 


812 




156 


3 


374 




81 


3 592 


30 254 


35 


871 


24 


225 


32 628 


40 


820 


24 486 


15 


288 


11 


188 


22 


018 



1 227 


203 


208 


154 


250 


153 


145 


74 


19 


21 


16 497 


23 156 


920 


20 750 


975 


11 954 


49.2 


18 000 


1 214 


6 544 


27.9 


11 523 


7 862 


1 227 


910 


24 254 


408 


5 695 


249 


3 335 


168 


6 623 


26 866 


25 473 


28 398 


33 167 


32 413 


34 027 


15 290 


12 198 


18 844 



765 


920 


616 


622 


440 


569 


169 


204 


658 


572 


547 


456 


352 


338 


137 


128 


103 


288 


65 


139 


84 


195 


32 


65 


272 


374 


208 


307 


103 


162 


3 013 


3 558 


893 


1 144 


893 


1 141 


653 


870 


350 


455 


117 


181 


131 


228 


17.1 


24.8 


67 


104 


98 


173 


31 


64 


80 


90 


40 


51 


47 


54 


19 


14 


51 


122 


27 


53 


51 


111 


12 


48 


109 


186 


94 


140 


62 


92 


704 


1 020 


23.4 


28.7 


262 


396 


262 


393 


216 


305 


134 


159 


46 


51 


369 


357 


873 


1 381 


1 571 


2 135 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 67 



Table 20. Social and Labor Force Characteristics of White Persons: 1990 

[Threshold and complementary threshold are 400 persons. Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text, for definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Florence, SC MSA 



Florence County 



Total 



Florence city 



Totals for split tracts/BNA's in Florence County 



Tract 2.01 



Tract 3 



Tract 5 



Tract 7 



Tract 10 



PLACE OF BIRTH 

All persons 

Native 

Foreign born 

LANGUAGE SPOKEN AT HOME AND ABILITY TO 
SPEAK ENGLISH 

Linguistically isolated households 

Persons 5 years and over 

Speak a language other than English 

Do not speak English "very well" 

In linguistically isolated households 

SCHOOL ENROLLMENT AND TYPE OF SCHOOL 

Persons 3 years and over enrolled in school 
Preprimory school 

Public school 

Elementary or high school 

Public school 

College 

Public college 

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT 

Persons 25 years and over 

Less than 9th grade 

9th to 12th grade, no diploma 

High school graduate (includes equivalency) 

Some college, no degree 

Associate degree 

Bachelor's degree 

Graduate or professional degree 

Percent high school graduate or higher 

Percent bachelor's degree or higher 

FERTILITY 

Children ever born per 1,000 women 15 to 44 years .. 

RESIDENCE IN 1985 

Persons 5 years and over 

Same house 

Different house in United States 

Central city of this MSA/PMSA 

Remainder of this MSA/PMSA. 

Different MSA/PMSA 

Not in an MSA/PMSA 

Abroad 

JOURNEY TO WORK 

Workers 16 years and over 

Car, truck, or von 

Drove alone 

Carpooled 

Public transportation 

Other means 

Worked at home 

Mean travel time to work (minutes) 

Worked in MSA/PMSA of residence 

Central city 

Outside central city 

Worked outside MSA/PMSA of residence 

LABOR FORCE STATUS 

Persons 16 years and over 

In labor force 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Percent of civilian labor force 

Females 16 years and over 

Employed 

Unemployed 

With own children under 6 years 

In labor force 

With own children 6 to 17 years only 

In labor force 

Persons 16 to 19 years 

Not enrolled in school 

Unemployed or not in labor force 

Not high school graduate 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Not in labor force 

WORK STATUS IN 1989 

Persons 16 years and over who worked in 
1989 

Usually worked 35 or more hours per week 

50 to 52 weeks 

DISABILITY 

Civilian noninstitutionalized persons 16 to 64 

years 

With a mobility or self-care limitation 

With a mobility limitation 

In labor force 

With a self-care limitation 

With a work disability 

In labor force 

Prevented from working 

No work disability 

In labor force 

Civilian noninstitutionalized persons 65 years 

and over 

With a mobility or self -care limitation 

With a mobility limitation 

With a self-care limitation 

68 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



69 553 

68 797 
756 



133 



65 397 


2 100 


767 


211 


17 500 


1 033 


443 


12 003 


10 792 


4 464 


4 010 


46 028 


5 132 


7 938 


13 845 


7 287 


3 217 


5 979 


2 630 


71.6 


18.7 



1 147 



65 397 


38 716 


26 288 


4 849 


10 675 


5 681 


5 083 


393 


34 954 


33 490 


29 365 


4 125 


39 


728 


697 


18.6 


30 260 


15 729 


14 531 


4 694 


55 093 


36 560 


35 315 


1 178 


3.2 


28 969 


15 995 


603 


3 663 


2 303 


5 278 


4 045 


4 349 


804 


3)6 


409 


165 


46 


198 


39 084 


31 670 


23 950 


45 864 


2 717 


1 170 


244 


2 153 


4 027 


1 359 


2 418 


41 837 


33 822 


8 191 


2 076 


1 595 


1 261 



69 553 

68 797 
756 



133 



65 397 


2 100 


767 


2)1 


17 500 


1 033 


443 


12 003 


10 792 


4 464 


4 010 


46 028 


5 132 


7 938 


13 845 


7 287 


3 217 


5 979 


2 630 


71.6 


18.7 



1 147 



65 397 


38 716 


26 288 


4 849 


10 675 


5 681 


5 083 


393 


34 954 


33 490 


29 365 


4 125 


39 


728 


697 


18.6 


30 260 


15 729 


14 531 


4 694 


55 093 


36 560 


35 315 


1 178 


3.2 


28 969 


15 995 


603 


3 663 


2 303 


5 278 


4 045 


4 349 


804 


316 


409 


165 


46 


198 


39 084 


31 670 


23 950 


45 864 


2 717 


1 170 


244 


2 153 


4 027 


1 359 


2 418 


41 837 


33 822 


8 191 


2 076 


1 595 


1 261 



15 621 

15 264 
357 



23 

14 767 

675 

241 

31 



396 

285 
108 
135 
812 
976 
883 



11 059 

902 
890 
2 777 
2 105 
685 
2 440 
1 260 

83.8 
33.5 



933 



14 767 



7 789 


6 765 


2 474 


1 089 


1 719 


1 483 


213 


7 773 


7 504 


6 843 


661 


18 


160 


91 


13.7 


6 979 


4 91) 


2 068 


794 


12 757 


8 078 


7 829 


242 


3.0 


6 931 


3 662 


111 


804 


537 


9)9 


745 


689 


137 


73 


63 


11 


14 


38 


8 591 


6 840 


5 120 


9 694 


553 


299 


37 


451 


745 


216 


504 


8 949 


7 490 


2 562 


564 


485 


409 



1 640 

1 58) 
59 



1 545 

51 
25 



484 

50 
8 
305 
236 
129 
102 



1 080 

45 
64 
224 
205 
60 
334 
148 

89.9 

44.6 



1 082 



1 545 

854 
660 

77 
165 
308 
110 

31 



952 

930 

854 

76 

7 
15 
15.3 
797 
482 
315 
155 



1 288 

959 
945 
7 
.7 
606 
384 

88 
55 
128 
109 
108 
12 



995 

788 
581 



1 186 

26 



26 
45 
22 
23 
41 
913 



1 1 



1 315 

1 311 

4 



1 254 

22 
5 
5 



289 

18 
10 
210 
198 
61 
55 



929 

49 
236 
312 
166 
55 
68 
43 

69.3 
11.9 



053 



1 254 

925 
327 
27 
96 
145 
59 
2 



698 

675 
617 

58 
3 

13 
7 
15.8 
596 
327 
269 
102 



1 082 

729 
708 
21 
2.9 
546 
326 
5 

65 
35 
94 
73 
69 
2 



95 

34 
26 



776 

633 
505 



917 

56 

18 

4 

43 

78 

33 

40 

839 

674 

165 

24 
17 
17 



3 149 

3 103 
46 



29 

2 973 

169 

74 
41 



1 106 

43 
22 
4)8 
394 
645 
645 



1 691 

311 
375 
610 
199 
89 
81 
26 

59.4 
6.3 



831 



2 973 

1 712 
1 242 
117 
4)0 
409 
306 
19 



1 549 

1 463 

1 228 

235 

61 
25 
18.8 
1 414 
859 
555 
135 



2 580 

1 638 

1 563 

75 

4.6 

1 336 

716 

44 

117 

81 

223 

131 

437 

37 

7 

13 

6 



2 054 

1 34) 
929 



2 344 

188 
15 

179 
183 
72 
105 

2 161 

1 518 

236 

63 
36 
31 



687 

682 
5 



659 

12 
12 
6 



78 



69 

64 

9 

9 



481 

356 
83 
19 
14 

4 
5 

8.7 
1.9 



605 



659 

508 
151 
46 

37 
68 



74 

74 
29 

45 



16.1 

66 

57 

9 

8 



563 

81 
74 

7 

8.6 

286 

36 

7 
37 
16 
10 

30 

25 
25 
25 



25 



97 

70 
47 



253 

139 
139 

125 
150 
5 
145 
103 
62 

71 

22 
22 
22 



1 454 

1 416 
38 



8 
1 394 



48 
16 



182 

35 
3) 
90 
90 
57 
43 

1 145 

113 
166 
291 
203 

86 
194 

92 

75.6 
25.0 



573 



1 394 

482 
904 
259 
238 
196 
211 
8 



575 

524 

469 

55 

51 

13.7 
520 
395 
125 
55 



1 303 

585 
575 
10 
1.7 
718 
234 

49 
38 
16 
16 
40 
9 
9 
9 



668 

592 
434 



716 

87 
47 
24 
70 
130 
70 
60 
586 
494 

383 

137 
118 
92 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 20. Social and Labor Force Characteristics of White Persons: 1990— Con. 

[Threshold ond complementary threshold are 400 persons. Data based on sample and subject to sompling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Totals for split tracts/BNA's in Florence County — Con. 



Tract 1 1 



Tract 15.01 



Tract 16.01 



Florence city, Florence County 



Tract 7 (pt.l 



Tract 10 (pt.) 



Tract 1 1 (pt.) 



Remainder of Florence County 



Tract 2.01 (pt.) 



Tract 3 (pt.) 



PLACE OF BIRTH 

All persons . 

Native 

Foreign born 



LANGUAGE SPOKEN AT HOME AND ABILITY TO 

SPEAK ENGLISH 
Linguistically isolated households 

Persons 5 years and over 

Speok a language other than English 

Do not speak English "very well" 

In linguistically isolated households 



SCHOOL ENROLLMENT AND TYPE OF SCHOOL 

Persons 3 years and over enrolled in school 
Preprimary school 

Public school 

Elementary or high school 

Public school 

College 

Public college 



EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT 

Persons 25 years and over 

Less than 9th grade 

9th to 12th grade, no diploma 

High school graduate (includes equivalency) . 

Some college, no degree 

Associate degree 

Bachelor's degree 

Graduate or professional degree 

Percent high school graduate or higher 

Percent bachelor's degree or higher 



FERTILITY 

Children ever born per 1 ,000 women 1 5 to 44 years . 

RESIDENCE IN 1985 

Persons 5 years and over 

Same house 

Different house in United States 

Central city of this MSA/PMSA 

Remainder of this MSA/PMSA 

Different MSA/PMSA 

Not in an MSA/PMSA 

Abroad 



JOURNEY TO WORK 

Workers 16 years and over.. 

Car, truck, or van 

Drove alone 

Carpooled 

Public transportation 

Other means 

Worked ot home 

Mean travel time to work (minutes) 

Worked in MSA/PMSA of residence 

Central city 

Outside central city 

Worked outside MSA/PMSA of residence 



LABOR FORCE STATUS 

Persons 16 years and over 

In labor force 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Percent of civilian labor force 

Females 16 years and over 
Employed 

Unemployed 

With own children under 6 years 

In labor force 

With own children 6 to 17 years only.. 

In labor force 

Persons 16 to 19 years 

Not enrolled in school 

Unemployed or not in labor force . 

Not high school graduate 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Not in labor force 



WORK STATUS IN 1989 

Persons 16 years and over who worked in 
1989 

Usually worked 35 or more hours per week 

50 to 52 weeks 



DISABILITY 

Gvilian noninstitutionalized persons 16 to 64 
years 

With a mobility or self-care limitation 

With a mobility limitation 

In labor force 

With o self-care limitation 

With a work disability 

In labor force 

Prevented from working 

No work disability 

In labor force 

Civilian noninstitutionalized persons 65 years 

and over 

With a mobility or self-care limitation 

With a mobility limitation 

With a self-care limitation 



3 672 3 285 2 903 

3 595 3 254 2 862 
77 31 41 



25 



620 



1 164 



1 155 



601 

596 
5 



1 454 

1 416 
38 



492 



573 



3 672 

3 595 

77 



620 



1 546 

1 487 
59 



1 253 



1 315 

I 311 
4 



3 482 


3 027 


2 712 


573 


1 394 


3 482 


1 451 


1 254 


103 


67 


45 


12 


86 


103 


51 


22 


27 


46 


29 


12 


48 


27 


25 


5 


- 


33 


16 


6 


16 


- 


- 


5 


669 


986 


747 


54 


182 


669 


465 


289 


61 


84 


39 


- 


35 


61 


50 


18 


28 


22 


13 


- 


31 


28 


8 


10 


363 


699 


543 


54 


90 


363 


291 


210 


311 


627 


504 


54 


90 


311 


222 


198 


245 


203 


165 


- 


57 


245 


124 


61 


237 


149 


122 


- 


43 


237 


97 


55 


2 711 


2 077 


1 837 


416 


1 145 


2 711 


1 028 


929 


196 


130 


151 


341 


113 


196 


45 


49 


238 


374 


328 


55 


166 


238 


63 


236 


779 


751 


625 


6 


291 


779 


224 


312 


581 


225 


376 


5 


203 


581 


192 


166 


170 


211 


149 


- 


86 


170 


60 


55 


487 


269 


165 


4 


194 


487 


296 


68 


260 


117 


43 


5 


92 


260 


148 


43 


84.0 


75.7 


73.9 


4.8 


75.6 


84.0 


89.5 


69.3 


27.6 


18.6 


11.3 


2.2 


25.0 


27.6 


43.2 


11.9 



053 



3 482 


3 027 


2 712 


573 


1 394 


3 482 


1 451 


1 254 


1 691 


1 560 


1 602 


454 


482 


1 691 


841 


925 


1 774 


1 449 


1 102 


119 


904 


1 774 


579 


327 


725 


229 


189 


14 


259 


725 


56 


27 


251 


794 


472 


- 


238 


251 


126 


96 


420 


291 


154 


37 


196 


420 


300 


145 


378 


135 


287 


68 


211 


378 


97 


59 


17 


18 


8 


- 


8 


17 


31 


2 


2 055 


1 729 


1 533 


38 


575 


2 055 


859 


698 


1 953 


1 661 


1 449 


38 


524 


1 953 


845 


675 


1 806 


1 519 


1 199 


4 


469 


1 806 


769 


617 


147 


142 


250 


34 


55 


147 


76 


58 


12 


- 


- 


- 


- 


12 


_ 


3 


63 


21 


44 


- 


51 


63 


7 


13 


27 


47 


40 


- 


- 


27 


7 


7 


13.0 


21.0 


17.1 


13.7 


13.7 


13.0 


15.4 


15.8 


1 853 


1 500 


1 422 


38 


520 


1 853 


727 


596 


1 284 


818 


865 


38 


395 


1 284 


444 


327 


569 


682 


557 


- 


125 


569 


283 


269 


202 


229 


111 


- 


55 


202 


132 


102 


3 129 


2 438 


2 286 


487 


1 303 


3 129 


1 194 


1 082 


2 156 


1 772 


1 661 


45 


585 


2 156 


865 


729 


2 081 


1 733 


1 553 


38 


575 


2 081 


852 


708 


75 


31 


108 


7 


10 


75 


6 


21 


3.5 


1.8 


6.5 


15.6 


1.7 


3.5 


.7 


2.9 


1 807 


1 261 


1 224 


249 


718 


1 807 


563 


546 


1 099 


728 


783 


14 


234 


1 099 


341 


326 


26 


7 


52 


7 


- 


26 


_ 


5 


115 


249 


122 


28 


49 


115 


88 


65 


90 


135 


83 


7 


38 


90 


55 


35 


160 


259 


293 


10 


16 


160 


120 


94 


154 


160 


250 


- 


16 


154 


101 


73 


109 


203 


251 


19 


40 


109 


94 


69 


32 


64 


45 


19 


9 


32 


12 


2 


14 


16 


16 


19 


9 


14 






14 


28 


30 


19 


9 


14 






- 


21 


14 


- 


_ 


_ 






14 


7 


5 


- 


_ 


14 


_ 




" 


— 


11 


19 


9 


- 


- 


- 


2 202 


1 942 


1 687 


61 


668 


2 202 


901 


776 


1 842 


1 704 


1 395 


39 


592 


1 842 


719 


633 


1 396 


1 297 


1 022 


16 


434 


1 396 


540 


505 


2 291 


2 230 


1 970 


206 


716 


2 291 


1 092 


917 


79 


43 


164 


139 


87 


79 


26 


56 


43 


27 


80 


139 


47 


43 




18 


5 


- 


20 


- 


24 


5 


_ 


4 


53 


35 


118 


125 


70 


53 


26 


43 


145 


145 


212 


145 


130 


145 


45 


78 


44 


49 


91 


- 


70 


44 


22 


33 


101 


86 


97 


145 


60 


101 


23 


40 


2 146 


2 085 


1 758 


61 


586 


2 146 


1 047 


839 


1 968 


1 680 


1 492 


31 


494 


1 968 


819 


674 


825 


200 


225 


42 


383 


825 


95 


165 


159 


46 


34 


22 


137 


159 


34 


24 


151 


30 


9 


22 


118 


151 


26 


17 


106 


28 


34 


22 


92 


106 


8 


17 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 69 



Table 20. Social and Labor Force Characteristics of White Persons: 1990— Con. 

[Threshold and complementary threshold are 400 persons. Data bosed on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 4 



Tract 5 (pt.) Tract 15.01 (pt.) 



Tract 15.02 Tract 16.01 (pt.) 



Tract 16.02 



Tract 17 



Tract 18 



PUCE OF BIRTH 

All persons 

Native 

Foreign born 

LANGUAGE SPOKEN AT HOME AND ABILITY TO 
SPEAK ENGLISH 
Linguistically isolated households 

Persons 5 years and over 

Speak a language other than English 

Do not speak English "very well" 

In linguistically isolated households 

SCHOOL ENROLLMENT AND TYPE OF SCHOOL 

Persons 3 years and over enrolled in school 
Preprimary school 

Public school 

Elementary or high school 

Public school 

College 

Public college 

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT 

Persons 25 years and over 

Less than 9th grade 

9th to 12th grade, no diploma 

High school graduate (includes equivalency) 

Some college, no degree 

Associate degree 

Bachelor's degree 

Graduate or professional degree 

Percent high school graduate or higher 

Percent bachelor's degree or higher 

FERTILITY 

Children ever born per 1,000 women 15 to 44 years ... 

RESIDENCE IN 1985 

Persons 5 years and over 

Same house 

Different house in United States 

Central city of this MSA/PMSA 

Remainder of this MSA/PMSA 

Different MSA/PMSA .. 

Not in an MSA/PMSA. 

Abroad 

JOURNEY TO WORK 

Workers 16 years and over 

Car, truck, or van 

Drove alone 

Carpooled 

Public transportation 

Other means 

Worked at home 

Mean travel time to work (minutes) 

Worked in MSA/PMSA of residence 

Central city 

Outside central city 

Worked outside MSA/PMSA of residence 

LABOR FORCE STATUS 

Persons 16 years and over 

In labor force 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Percent of civilian labor force 

Females 16 years and over 

Employed 

Unemployed 

With own children under 6 years 

In labor force 

With own children 6 to 17 years only 

In labor force 

Persons 16 to 19 years 

Not enrolled in school 

Unemployed or not in labor force 

Not high school graduate 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Not in labor force 

WORK STATUS IN 1989 

Persons 16 years and over who worked in 

1989 

Usually worked 35 or more hours per week 

50 to 52 weeks ... 1 

DISABILITY 

Gvilian noninstitutionalized persons 16 to 64 

years 

With a mobility or self-care limitation 

With a mobility limitation 

In labor force 

With a self-care limitation 

With a work disability 

In labor force 

Prevented from working 

No work disability 

In labor force 

Civilian noninstitutionalized persons 65 years 

and over 

With a mobility or self-care limitation 

With a mobility limitation 

With a self-care limitation 



2 752 

2 739 

13 



998 



3 149 

3 103 
46 



29 



831 



3 285 

3 254 
31 



25 



1 164 



2 997 

2 997 



2 699 

2 683 
16 



441 



1 144 



2 640 

2 631 
9 



1 252 



895 

895 



1 236 



2 354 

2 354 



2 566 


2 973 


3 027 


2 808 


2 539 


2 506 


825 


2 251 


28 


169 


67 


49 


40 


8 


27 


28 


6 


74 


46 


11 


29 


8 


14 


11 


- 


41 


33 


- 


16 


- 


- 


3 


657 


1 106 


986 


815 


663 


668 


209 


633 


10 


43 


84 


36 


23 


56 


14 


21 


- 


22 


22 


31 


5 


37 


_ 


6 


388 


418 


699 


633 


485 


500 


139 


460 


370 


394 


627 


533 


446 


477 


139 


441 


259 


645 


203 


146 


155 


112 


56 


152 


242 


645 


149 


146 


112 


96 


49 


152 


1 653 


1 691 


2 077 


1 912 


1 748 


1 779 


587 


1 639 


176 


311 


130 


242 


132 


231 


131 


238 


476 


375 


374 


407 


310 


439 


101 


322 


443 


610 


751 


758 


600 


550 


167 


591 


277 


199 


225 


261 


358 


236 


121 


234 


138 


89 


211 


118 


149 


168 


46 


93 


81 


81 


269 


95 


156 


118 


16 


105 


62 


26 


117 


31 


43 


37 


5 


56 


60.6 


59.4 


75.7 


66.1 


74.7 


62.3 


60.5 


65.8 


8.7 


6.3 


18.6 


6.6 


11.4 


8.7 


3.6 


9.8 



1 376 



2 566 


2 973 


3 027 


2 808 


2 539 


2 506 


825 


2 251 


1 217 


1 712 


1 560 


1 605 


1 502 


1 659 


614 


1 735 


1 335 


1 242 


1 449 


1 203 


1 037 


847 


211 


516 


155 


117 


229 


147 


172 


172 


6 


8 


684 


410 


794 


764 


424 


479 


114 


340 


281 


409 


291 


158 


154 


122 


62 


71 


215 


306 


135 


134 


287 


74 


29 


97 


14 


19 


18 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 322 


1 549 


1 729 


1 422 


1 470 


1 318 


407 


1 251 


1 263 


1 463 


1 661 


1 364 


1 386 


1 225 


399 


1 206 


1 140 


1 228 


1 519 


1 234 


1 136 


1 083 


333 


1 085 


123 


235 


142 


130 


250 


142 


66 


121 
9 
17 


35 


61 


21 


39 


44 


27 


_ 


24 


25 


47 


19 


40 


66 


8 


19 


19.1 


18.8 


21.0 


21.2 


17.2 


24.0 


22.1 


24.3 


1 143 


1 414 


1 500 


1 306 


1 359 


1 226 


360 


1 084 


734 


859 


818 


837 


838 


589 


162 


326 


409 


555 


682 


469 


521 


637 


198 


758 


179 


135 


229 


116 


111 


92 


47 


167 


2 191 


2 580 


2 438 


2 292 


2 167 


2 090 


702 


1 891 


1 445 


1 638 


1 772 


1 498 


1 590 


1 363 


427 


1 317 


1 395 


1 563 


1 733 


1 434 


1 490 


1 321 


407 


1 274 


50 


75 


31 


64 


100 


36 


20 


39 


3.5 


4.6 


1.8 


4.3 


6.3 


2.7 


4.7 


3.0 


1 094 


1 336 


1 261 


1 214 


1 122 


1 063 


348 


994 


594 


716 


728 


681 


730 


532 


152 


592 


36 


44 


7 


23 


44 


16 


15 


28 


211 


117 


249 


133 


94 


179 


69 


93 


157 


81 


135 


58 


66 


83 


38 


68 


116 


223 


259 


305 


276 


211 


69 


229 


72 


131 


160 


201 


233 


166 


43 


216 


182 


437 


203 


197 


231 


166 


65 


163 


44 


37 


64 


43 


45 


16 


18 


24 


22 


7 


16 


7 


16 


9 


15 


3 


33 


13 


28 


21 


30 


16 


10 


6 


11 


6 


21 


14 


14 


7 


3 


6 


_ 


- 


7 


- 


5 


- 


7 


_ 


22 


7 


— 


7 


11 


9 


_ 


- 


1 512 


2 054 


1 942 


1 663 


1 625 


1 452 


458 


1 342 


1 310 


1 341 


1 704 


1 355 


1 341 


1 203 


368 


1 118 


1 080 


929 


1 297 


1 031 


976 


1 013 


283 


834 


1 917 


2 344 


2 230 


2 009 


1 881 


1 711 


598 


1 543 


147 


188 


43 


107 


146 


224 


37 


182 


30 


15 


27 


39 


73 


48 


20 


44 


20 


- 


- 


- 


20 


21 


_ 


13 


127 


179 


35 


89 


100 


200 


24 


150 


141 


183 


145 


162 


193 


145 


98 


96 


37 


72 


49 


33 


83 


53 


15 


36 


104 


105 


86 


112 


86 


85 


75 


60 


1 776 


2 161 


2 085 


1 847 


1 688 


1 566 


500 


1 447 


1 374 


1 518 


1 680 


1 436 


1 429 


1 239 


376 


1 214 


274 


236 


200 


283 


195 


272 


104 


344 


68 


63 


46 


59 


34 


96 


6 


94 


20 


36 


30 


54 


9 


75 


- 


74 


48 


31 


28 


35 


34 


49 


6 


46 



70 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 20. Social and Labor Force Characteristics of White Persons: 1990 -Con. 

[Threshold and complementary threshold are 400 persons. Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 19 



Tract 20 



Tract 22.01 



Tract 22.02 



Tract 23 



Tract 24.98 



Tract 25 



Tract 26 



PUCE OF BIRTH 

All persons 

Native 

Foreign born 

LANGUAGE SPOKEN AT HOME AND ABILITY TO 

SPEAK ENGLISH 
Linguistically isolated households 

Persons 5 years and over 

Speak a language other than English 

Do not speak English "very well" 

In linguistically isolated households 

SCHOOL ENROLLMENT AND TYPE OF SCHOOL 

Persons 3 years and over enrolled in school 
Preprimary school 

Public school 

Elementary or high school 

Public school 

College 

Public college 

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT 

Persons 25 years and over 

Less thon 9th grade 

9th to 12th grade, no diploma 

High school graduate (includes equivalency) 

Some college, no degree 

Associate degree 

Bachelor's degree 

Graduate or professional degree 

Percent high school graduate or higher 

Percent bachelor's degree or higher 

FERTILITY 

Children ever born per 1,000 women 15 to 44 years __ 

RESIDENCE IN 1985 

Persons 5 years and over 

Same house 

Different house in United States 

Central city of this MSA/PMSA 

Remainder of this MSA/PMSA 

Different MSA/PMSA 

Not in an MSA/PMSA 

Abroad 

JOURNEY TO WORK 

Workers 16 years and over 

Cor, truck, or van 

Drove alone 

Carpooled 

Public transportation 

Other means 

Worked at home 

Mean travel time to work (minutes) 

Worked in MSA/PMSA of residence 

Central city 

Outside central city 

Worked outside MSA/PMSA of residence 

LABOR FORCE STATUS 

Persons 16 years and over 

In labor force 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Percent of civilian labor force 

Females 16 years and over 

Employed 

Unemployed 

With own children under 6 years 

In labor force 

With own children 6 to 17 years only 

In labor force 

Persons 16 to 19 years 

Not enrolled in school 

Unemployed or not in labor force 

Not high school graduate 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Not in labor force 

WORK STATUS IN 1989 

Persons 16 years and over who worked in 
1989 

Usually worked 35 or more hours per week 

50 to 52 weeks 

DISABILITY 

Civilian noninstitutionalized persons 16 to 64 

years 

With a mobility or self-care limitation 

With a mobility limitation 

In labor force 

With a self-care limitation 

With a work disability 

In labor force 

Prevented from working 

No work disability 

In labor force 

Civilian noninstitutionalized persons 65 years 

and over 

With a mobility or self-care limitation 

With a mobility limitation 

With a self-care limitation 



4 298 

4 265 
33 



276 



2 771 

2 759 
12 



1 302 



1 367 

1 362 
5 



1 202 



1 772 

1 759 

13 



2 505 

2 505 



2 605 

2 605 



1 384 



1 359 



486 



1 800 

1 789 

11 



1 435 



1 420 

1 413 
7 



4 002 


2 595 


1 327 


1 646 


2 350 


2 447 


1 680 


1 334 


63 


121 


37 


41 


56 


51 


14 


20 


10 


19 


: 


14 


25 


27 
9 


14 




1 092 


668 


316 


386 


548 


627 


408 


373 


59 


21 


26 


5 


3 


14 


23 


22 


51 


18 


13 


- 


3 


6 


13 


13 


900 


501 


210 


271 


470 


521 


348 


312 


861 


450 


179 


245 


458 


493 


278 


246 


133 


146 


80 


110 


75 


92 


37 


39 


114 


108 


72 


92 


75 


84 


25 


38 


2 643 


1 827 


971 


1 305 


1 573 


1 703 


1 170 


965 


530 


309 


128 


113 


379 


341 


146 


106 


537 


406 


257 


153 


488 


382 


337 


189 


868 


705 


296 


290 


465 


511 


412 


371 


303 


205 


133 


214 


96 


224 


172 


111 


156 


71 


30 


95 


84 


88 


39 


66 


161 


107 


86 


322 


48 


109 


53 


92 


88 


24 


41 


118 


13 


48 


11 


30 


59.6 


60.9 


60.4 


79.6 


44.9 


57.5 


58.7 


69.4 


9.4 


7.2 


13.1 


33.7 


3.9 


9.2 


5.5 


12.6 



1 383 



4 002 


2 595 


1 327 


1 646 


2 350 


2 447 


1 680 


1 334 


2 492 


1 710 


945 


990 


1 576 


1 566 


1 257 


968 


1 490 


878 


382 


656 


774 


881 


423 


351 


- 


24 


16 


33 


51 


64 


7 


27 


739 


708 


247 


361 


644 


512 


341 


209 


143 


16 


61 


182 


12 


139 


21 


42 


608 


130 


58 


80 


67 


166 


54 


73 


20 


7 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


15 


1 912 


1 213 


737 


816 


1 091 


1 178 


892 


658 


1 805 


1 165 


708 


782 


1 037 


1 131 


839 


606 


1 421 


974 


576 


718 


837 


902 


599 


524 


384 


191 


132 


M 


200 


229 


240 


82 


2 


— 


— 


— 


— 


_ 


_ 


7 


58 


44 


22 


13 


38 


30 


25 


18 


47 


4 


7 


21 


16 


17 


28 


27 


21.9 


21.3 


16.8 


18.4 


24.5 


24.1 


25.3 


21.0 


1 188 


1 012 


646 


674 


969 


951 


780 


576 


92 


116 


120 


91 


250 


165 


262 


235 


1 096 


896 


526 


583 


719 


786 


518 


341 


724 


201 


91 


142 


122 


227 


112 


82 


3 222 


2 184 


1 141 


1 439 


1 900 


2 023 


1 387 


1 093 


2 020 


1 261 


782 


855 


1 202 


1 257 


920 


696 


1 948 


1 225 


748 


821 


1 141 


1 192 


892 


665 


57 


30 


34 


34 


61 


65 


28 


31 


2.8 


2.4 


4.3 


4.0 


5.1 


5.2 


3.0 


4 5 


1 690 


1 111 


618 


794 


979 


1 054 


706 


606 


846 


546 


349 


368 


458 


538 


334 


287 


24 


8 


19 


10 


42 


18 


22 


24 


258 


112 


29 


90 


155 


129 


119 


73 


87 


53 


16 


36 


79 


111 


73 


54 


374 


177 


124 


112 


209 


197 


148 


126 


316 


130 


110 


81 


109 


140 


116 


90 


299 


170 


84 


84 


134 


174 


109 


79 


114 


43 


16 


10 


43 


29 


19 


3 


55 


36 


6 


- 


6 


16 


19 




63 


28 


10 


- 


13 


20 


19 




14 


1 


10 


- 


8 


13 






- 


4 


- 


- 


3 


2 






49 


23 


— 


~~ 


2 


5 


19 


- 


2 188 


1 439 


834 


949 


1 296 


1 302 


980 


712 


1 845 


1 223 


633 


741 


1 075 


1 131 


845 


578 


1 389 


867 


476 


520 


717 


826 


671 


389 


2 734 


1 820 


888 


1 070 


1 632 


1 633 


1 140 


875 


116 


148 


81 


78 


101 


125 


17 


28 


51 


107 


45 


59 


44 


53 


17 


19 


8 


28 


18 


12 


5 


2 




4 


93 


88 


54 


53 


82 


92 


__ 


13 


277 


306 


106 


112 


214 


191 


42 


54 


89 


101 


59 


23 


49 


57 


18 


6 


167 


196 


38 


83 


153 


120 


17 


36 


2 457 


1 514 


782 


958 


1 418 


1 442 


1 098 


821 


1 866 


1 111 


679 


750 


1 108 


1 166 


886 


650 


473 


295 


253 


353 


268 


332 


247 


214 


175 


59 


72 


81 


81 


130 


77 


75 


125 


49 


62 


53 


65 


114 


77 


50 


99 


26 


25 


56 


63 


60 


34 


46 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 71 



Table 21. Occupation, Income in 1989, and Poverty Status in 1989 of White Persons: 1990 

[Threshold and complementary threshold are 400 persons. Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Florence, SC MSA 


35 315 


4 215 


4 919 


1 384 


5 172 


5 978 


110 


372 


2 620 


857 


4 934 


2 524 


1 120 


1 110 


26 373 


1 605 


2 414 


2 213 


4 663 


4 494 


5 315 


3 822 


950 


897 


29 745 


37 059 


19 687 


35 301 


14 163 


26 373 


21 561 


37 722 


6 929 


7 451 


1 227 


3 561 


42 897 


43 089 


45 891 


46 598 


22 898 


18 177 



Florence County 



Total 



Florence city 



Totals for split tracts/BNA's in Florence County 



Tract 2.01 



Tract 3 



Tract 5 



Tract 7 



Tract 10 



OCCUPATION 

Employed persons 16 years and over 

Executive, administrative, and managerial occupations 

Professional specialty occupations 

Technicians and related support occupations 

Sales occupations 

Administrative support occupations, including clerical 

Private household occupations 

Protective service occupations 

Service occupations, except protective and household 

Farming, forestry, and fishing occupations 

Precision production, craft, and repair occupations 

Machine operators, assemblers, and inspectors 

Transportation and material moving occupations 

Handlers, equipment cleaners, helpers, and laborers 

INCOME IN 1989 

Households 

Less than $5,000— 

$5,000 to $9,999 - 

$10,000 to $14,999 

$15,000 to $24,999.. 

$25,000 to $34,999 

$35,000 to $49,999 

$50,000 to $74,999 

$75,000 to $99,999 

$100,000 or more... 

Median (dollars) 

Mean (dollars) 

Families 

Median income (dollars) 

Per capita income (dollars) 

INCOME TYPE IN 1989 

Households 

With earnings 

Mean earnings (dollars) 

With Social Security income 

Mean Social Security income (dollars) 

With public assistance income 

Mean public assistance income (dollars) 

MEAN FAMILY INCOME IN 1989 BY FAMILY TYPE 
Families (dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

Married-couple families (dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

Female householder, no husband present 
(dollars)... 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

POVERTY STATUS IN 1989 

All Income Levels In 1989 

Families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Married-couple families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Unrelated individuals for whom poverty status is 

determined 

Nonfamily householder 

65 years and over 

Persons for whom poverty status is determined. 

Persons under 18 years 

Related children under 18 years 

Related children 5 to 17 years 

Persons 65 years and over 

Income In 1989 Below Poverty Level 

Families 

Percent below poverty level 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Married-couple families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Unrelated individuals 

Nonfamily householder 

65 years and over 

Persons 

Percent below poverty level 

Persons under 18 years 

Related children under 18 years 

Related children 5 to 17 years 

Persons 65 years and over 

Ratio of income in 1989 to poverty level: 

Persons below 50 percent of poverty level 

Persons below 125 percent of poverty level 



35 315 

4 215 



19 687 


16 170 


9 371 


3 306 


16 926 


14 247 


7 939 


2 941 


2 227 


1 528 


1 136 


278 


8 184 


6 686 


2 739 


67 944 


16 440 


16 378 


12 235 


8 191 


1 276 


6.5 


613 


716 


285 


859 


432 


414 


180 


403 


173 


290 


101 


2 258 


1 627 


976 


6 314 


9.3 


1 488 


1 442 


1 051 


1 513 


2 507 


9 304 



4 919 

1 384 

5 172 
5 978 

110 
372 

2 620 
857 

4 934 
2 524 
1 120 
1 110 



26 373 



605 

414 

213 

663 

494 

315 

3 822 

950 

897 

29 745 

37 059 

19 687 

35 301 

14 163 



26 373 

21 561 
37 722 

6 929 

7 451 
1 227 
3 561 



42 897 

43 089 

45 891 

46 598 

22 898 

18 177 



19 687 


16 170 


9 371 


3 306 


16 926 


14 247 


7 939 


2 941 


2 227 


1 528 


1 136 


278 


8 184 


6 686 


2 739 


67 944 


16 440 


16 378 


12 235 


8 191 


1 276 


6.5 


613 


716 


285 


859 


432 


414 


180 


403 


173 


290 


101 


2 258 


1 627 


976 


6 314 


9.3 


1 488 


1 442 


1 051 


1 513 


2 507 


9 304 



7 829 

1 353 

1 702 

354 

1 414 

1 239 

34 

76 

501 

69 

560 

236 

156 

135 



6 500 

349 

409 

477 

1 008 

1 029 

1 372 

1 053 

385 

418 

34 763 

45 502 

4 185 

43 700 

19 015 



6 500 

4 983 
45 683 
2 098 
8 439 
217 
4 318 



56 874 

58 067 
60 922 

64 217 

29 546 

16 944 



4 185 


3 289 


1 724 


751 


3 592 


2 893 


1 457 


652 


481 


318 


211 


70 


2 863 


2 315 


998 


15 077 


3 104 


3 075 


2 221 


2 562 


147 


3.5 


59 


51 


32 


104 


39 


18 


6 


43 


20 


33 


26 


643 


378 


258 


1 028 


6.8 


120 


101 


55 


372 


526 


1 539 



945 

181 
195 
34 
135 
134 



99 
7 

98 

21 
8 

33 



626 

9 

42 

33 

59 

46 

123 

188 

32 

94 

50 200 

71 568 

516 

57 879 

27 161 



626 

583 

64 929 

68 

8 318 



82 248 


97 


422 


88 


522 


06 618 


39 991 


48 


800 



516 

449 

251 

66 

448 

381 

207 

59 

49 

49 

25 

7 

134 

110 

9 

1 640 

411 

411 

316 

95 



37 

26 

9 

37 

2.3 



14 
71 



69 


109 


32 


93 


129 


39 


48 


4 


140 


16 


24 


5 


505 


6 


52 


30 


97 


91 


124 


60 


40 


5 


30 815 


36 328 


417 


35 625 


13 909 


505 


424 


37 320 


133 


8 616 


13 


5 111 


39 415 


46 303 


41 702 


47 696 



18 639 



417 

338 

158 

47 

373 

310 

145 

40 

27 

14 

3 

3 

108 

88 

38 

1 315 

281 
279 
218 
165 



16 

3.8 

3 
10 

3 
6 



18 

7 

76 

5.8 

14 
12 
3 
16 

39 
138 



1 563 


134 


125 


46 


188 


306 


4 


16 


239 


29 


265 


128 


25 


58 


1 061 


62 


97 


102 


229 


198 


189 


141 


18 


25 


27 411 


36 916 


793 


29 321 


12 782 


1 061 


910 


39 051 


237 


5 644 


58 


4 538 


41 287 


30 611 


47 362 


34 842 


17 186 


17 919 



793 

714 
431 
151 
630 
577 
297 
108 
129 
108 
105 
33 

363 

268 

100 

2 631 

633 
633 
465 
236 



90 

11.3 

57 

83 

36 

49 

31 

42 

24 

33 

18 

33 

12 

HI 

64 

28 

398 

15.1 

144 

144 

95 

40 

146 
538 



74 

9 
14 



26 
12 



99 

25 
24 


4 
22 

9 
15 


20 313 

24 038 

61 

27 361 


4 271 


99 

49 
32 783 

62 
6 375 

22 
2 724 


31 620 

38 152 
47 421 

59 872 


3 610 

919 



61 

30 
38 
22 
39 

15 
24 
15 
22 

15 
14 

7 

170 

38 

42 

414 

90 
90 
62 
71 



14 

23.0 

7 
14 

7 



14 

7 

14 

7 

132 

17 

11 

171 

41.3 

25 

25 

11 

11 

142 
202 



575 


59 


83 


66 


74 


78 


8 


102 


17 


66 


8 


6 


8 


706 


42 


122 


67 


125 


182 


112 


33 


7 


16 


24 559 


27 421 


281 


28 750 


13 799 


706 


443 


31 320 


293 


7 661 


59 


5 350 


30 450 


25 136 


31 590 


26 853 


28 143 


19 278 



281 

192 
75 
52 
216 
162 
58 
52 
59 
30 
17 



512 

425 

220 

1 234 

157 

149 

89 

383 



8 

2.8 



138 

81 
61 
152 

12.3 



64 

257 



72 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 21 



Occupation, Income in 1989, and Poverty Status in 1989 of White Persons: 1990 -Con 



[Threshold and complementary threshold are 400 persons. Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Totals for split tracts/BNA's in Florence County — Con. 



Tract 1 1 


Tract 15.01 


Tract 16.01 


2 081 


1 


733 


1 553 


228 




279 


128 


452 




154 


187 


107 




88 


53 


378 




209 


274 


394 




257 


318 


- 




3 


- 


21 




12 


- 


100 




127 


115 


39 




41 


25 


184 




242 


205 


89 




178 


91 


54 




72 


97 


35 




71 


60 


1 886 


1 


137 


1 044 


124 




67 


62 


168 




59 


76 


226 




62 


133 


422 




217 


187 


336 




135 


215 


297 




341 


159 


217 




203 


152 


38 




34 


37 


58 




19 


23 


25 089 


35 


699 


26 798 


34 086 


37 


595 


32 506 


898 




963 


786 


36 306 


37 096 


31 389 


17 341 


13 006 


11 840 


1 886 


1 


137 


1 044 


1 410 


1 


048 


887 


32 938 


37 445 


34 074 


694 




157 


232 


7 681 


6 


144 


6 486 


45 




39 


43 


1 980 


2 


183 


2 087 


47 815 


39 944 


36 325 


33 611 


38 


237 


35 518 


50 829 


40 962 


38 940 


36 948 


39 


121 


42 211 


30 108 


25 261 


13 351 


17 211 


3 


617 


13 168 



Florence city, Florence County 



Tract 7 (pt.: 



Tract 10 (pt.) 



Tract 11 (pt.) 



Remainder of Florence County 



Tract 2.01 (pt.) 



Tract 3 (pt.) 


708 


69 


109 


32 


93 


129 


39 


48 


4 


140 


16 


24 


5 


505 


6 


52 


30 


97 


91 


124 


60 


40 


5 


30 815 


36 328 


417 


35 625 


13 909 


505 


424 


37 320 


133 


8 616 


13 


5 111 


39 415 


46 303 


41 702 


47 696 



OCCUPATION 

Employed persons 16 years and over 

Executive, administrative, and managerial occupations 

Professional specialty occupations 

Technicians and related support occupations 

Sales occupations 

Administrative support occupations, including clerical 

Private household occupations 

Protective service occupations 

Service occupations, except protective and household 

Farming, forestry, and fishing occupations 

Precision production, craft, and repair occupations 

Machine operators, assemblers, and inspectors 

Transportation and material moving occupations 

Handlers, equipment cleaners, helpers, and laborers 

INCOME IN 1989 

Households 

Less than $5,000 

$5,000 to $9,999 

$10,000 to $14,999 - 

$15,000 to $24,999 

$25,000 to $34,999 

$35,000 to $49,999 

$50,000 to $74,999 

$75,000 to $99,999 - 

$100,000 or more 

Median (dollars) 

Mean (dollars) 

Families 

Median income (dollars) 

Per capita income (dollars) 

INCOME TYPE IN 1989 

Households 

With earnings 

Mean earnings (dollars) 

With Social Security income 

Mean Social Security income (dollars) 

With public assistance income 

Mean public assistance income (dollars) 

MEAN FAMILY INCOME IN 1989 BY FAMILY TYPE 
Families (dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

Married-couple families (dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

Female householder, no husband present 
(dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

POVERTY STATUS IN 1989 

All Income Levels In 1989 

Families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Married-couple families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With reloted children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Unrelated individuals for whom poverty status is 

determined 

Nonfamily householder 

65 years and over 

Persons for whom poverty status is determined. 

Persons under 18 years 

Related children under 18 years 

Related children 5 to 17 years 

Persons 65 years and over 

Income In 1989 Below Poverty Level 

Families 

Percent below poverty level 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Married-couple families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Unrelated individuals 

Nonfamily householder 

65 years and over 

Persons 

Percent below poverty level 

Persons under 18 years 

Related children under 18 years 

Related children 5 to 17 years 

Persons 65 years and over 

Ratio of income in 1989 to poverty level: 

Persons below 50 percent of poverty level 

Persons below 125 percent of poverty level 



898 

654 

305 

138 

736 

543 

242 

109 

136 

85 

54 

20 

1 163 

988 

361 

3 659 

574 
574 

384 
825 



46 

5.1 
19 



46 

19 



190 

148 

89 

290 

7.9 



158 



99 

471 



963 

885 

545 

273 

904 

852 

513 

257 

52 

33 

32 

16 

• 207 

174 
36 
3 285 
976 
965 
707 
200 



73 

7.6 
54 
51 
46 
56 
49 
38 
38 
17 
5 
13 
8 

53 
45 
28 
268 
8.2 
83 
72 
21 
55 

134 
418 



786 

654 

432 

101 

660 

552 

328 

58 

103 

79 

88 

27 

304 

258 

96 

812 

759 
759 
568 
225 



58 

7.4 
26 
43 
18 
28 
20 
20 
7 
30 
6 

23 
11 
53 
47 
47 
247 
8.8 
84 
84 
60 
62 

97 
396 



38 

14 



52 

20 
6 

4 
7 



15 000 


28 175 


29 


60 073 


3 423 


52 


26 


39 804 


38 


4 864 


22 


2 724 


38 510 


38 510 


73 595 


73 595 


919 


919 



29 

7 

29 
22 
15 

15 
15 
14 

7 
14 
7 

155 

23 
27 
328 
80 
80 
52 
42 



14 

48.3 

7 
14 

7 



14 

7 

14 

7 

127 

12 

6 

166 

50.6 

25 

25 

11 

6 

142 
183 



575 

59 
83 
66 

74 
78 

8 
102 
17 
66 
8 
6 
8 



706 

42 
122 

67 
125 
182 
112 

33 
7 

16 
24 559 

27 421 
281 

28 750 

13 799 



706 

443 

31 320 

293 

7 661 

59 

5 350 



30 450 

25 136 

31 590 

26 853 

28 143 

19 278 



281 

192 
75 
52 
216 
162 
58 
52 
59 
30 
17 



512 

425 

220 

1 234 

157 

149 

89 

383 



8 

2.8 



138 

81 
61 
152 

12.3 
8 



64 
257 



2 081 

228 
452 
107 
378 
394 

21 
100 
39 
184 
89 
54 
35 



1 886 

124 

168 

226 

422 

336 

297 

217 

38 

58 

25 089 

34 086 

898 

36 306 

17 341 



1 886 

1 410 

32 938 

694 

7 681 

45 

1 980 



47 815 

33 611 
50 829 

36 948 

30 108 

17 211 



898 

654 

305 

138 

736 

543 

242 

109 

136 

85 

54 

20 

1 163 

988 

361 

3 659 

574 
574 
384 
825 



46 

5.1 
19 



190 

148 

89 

290 

7.9 



158 



99 
471 



852 

169 
165 
34 
135 
110 



85 
7 

85 

21 
8 

33 



571 

9 

42 

33 

48 

30 

95 

188 

32 

94 

55 447 

75 091 

495 

58 907 

27 573 



571 

528 

68 056 

68 

8 318 



83 970 

102 673 
89 295 

109 055 

39 991 

48 800 



495 

428 

230 

66 

440 

373 

199 

59 

49 

49 

25 

7 

82 

76 

9 

1 546 

397 

397 

302 

95 



32 

26 

9 

32 

2.1 



9 
66 



18 639 



417 

338 

158 

47 

373 

310 

145 

40 

27 

14 

3 

3 

108 

88 

38 

1 315 

281 
279 
218 
165 



16 

3.8 

3 
10 
3 
6 



18 

7 

76 

5.8 

14 
12 
3 
16 

39 
138 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 73 



Table 21 



Occupation, Income in 1989, and Poverty Status in 1989 of White Persons: 1990 -Con. 



[Threshold and complementary threshold are 400 persons. Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 4 


Tract 5 (pt.) 


Tract 15.01 


(pt.) 


Tract 15.02 


Tract 16.01 


(pt.) 


Tract 16.02 


1 395 


1 563 


1 


733 


1 434 


1 


490 


1 321 


60 


134 




279 


167 




128 


113 


105 


125 




154 


98 




187 


132 


68 


46 




88 


13 




53 


53 


194 


188 




209 


176 




247 


226 


295 


306 




257 


283 




300 


203 


- 


4 




3 


14 




- 


_ 


36 


16 




12 


- 




- 


10 


139 


239 




127 


133 




105 


64 


34 


29 




41 


37 




25 


78 


221 


265 




242 


273 




205 


216 


109 


128 




178 


125 




83 


103 


83 


25 




72 


77 




97 


72 


51 


58 




71 


38 




60 


51 


1 009 


1 061 


1 


137 


1 033 




944 


914 


135 


62 




67 


36 




40 


36 


51 


97 




59 


121 




56 


103 


171 


102 




62 


17 




102 


48 


165 


229 




217 


253 




179 


178 


187 


198 




135 


199 




205 


241 


189 


189 




341 


227 




159 


134 


83 


141 




203 


158 




143 


140 


12 


18 




34 


10 




37 


14 


16 


25 




19 


12 




23 


20 


24 219 


27 411 


35 


699 


30 996 


28 333 


28 670 


26 690 


36 916 


37 


595 


33 153 


34 453 


33 461 


746 


793 




963 


846 




723 


755 


29 872 


29 321 


37 


096 


32 955 


33 


356 


31 442 


10 495 


12 782 


13 


006 


11 623 


12 


273 


11 667 


1 009 


1 061 


1 


137 


1 033 




944 


914 


798 


910 


1 


048 


850 




835 


810 


29 967 


39 051 


37 445 


33 286 


34 


837 


32 443 


162 


237 




157 


255 




200 


264 


6 572 


5 644 


6 


144 


7 898 


6 57 


6 000 


27 


58 




39 


45 




24 


68 


2 040 


4 538 


2 


183 


2 363 


2 435 


2 900 


33 143 


41 287 


39 944 


36 283 


37 878 


36 517 


27 126 


30 611 


38 


237 


39 734 


38 


156 


36 310 


34 568 


47 362 


40 962 


39 155 


38 


787 


38 751 


28 230 


34 842 


39 


121 


44 214 


41 


987 


37 976 


22 839 


17 186 


25 261 


19 554 


15 


588 


24 952 


19 282 


17 919 


3 617 


14 020 


17 


193 


18 366 



Tract 17 



Tract 18 



OCCUPATION 

Employed persons 16 years and over 

Executive, administrative, and managerial occupations 

Professional specialty occupations 

Technicians and related support occupations 

Sales occupations 

Administrative support occupations, including clerical 

Private household occupations 

Protective service occupations 

Service occupations, except protective and household 

Farming, forestry, and fishing occupations 

Precision production, craft, and repair occupations 

Machine operators, assemblers, and inspectors 

Transportation and material moving occupations 

Handlers, equipment cleaners, helpers, and laborers 

INCOME IN 1989 

Households 

Less than $5,000— — 

$5,000 to $9,999 

$10,000 to $14,999 

$15,000 to $24,999 „ 

$25,000 to $34,999 

$35,000 to $49,999 

$50,000 to $74,999 

$75,000 to $99,999 

$100,000 or more - 

Median (dollars) 

Mean (dollars) 

Families 

Median income (dollars) 

Per capita income (dollars) 

INCOME TYPE IN 1989 

Households 

With earnings 

Mean earnings (dollars) 

With Social Security income 

Mean Social Security income (dollars) 

With public assistance income 

Mean public assistance income (dollars) 

MEAN FAMILY INCOME IN 1989 BY FAMILY TYPE 
Families (dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

Married-couple families (dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

Female householder, no husband present 
(dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

POVERTY STATUS IN 1989 

All Income Levels In 1989 

Families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Married-couple families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Unrelated individuals for whom poverty status is 

determined 

Nonfamily householder 

65 years and over 

Persons for whom poverty status is determined _ 

Persons under 18 years 

Related children under 18 years 

Related children 5 to 17 years 

Persons 65 years and over 

Income In 1989 Below Poverty Level 

Families 

Percent below poverty level 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Married-couple families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Unrelated individuals 

Nonfamily householder 

65 years and over 

Persons 

Percent below poverty level 

Persons under 18 years 

Related children under 18 years 

Related children 5 to 17 years 

Persons 65 years and over 

Ratio of income in 1989 to poverty level: 

Persons below 50 percent of poverty level 

Persons below 125 percent of poverty level 



407 


51 


12 


5 


33 


80 


4 


11 


32 


20 


79 


49 


19 


12 


304 


21 


18 


33 


55 


64 


75 


31 


7 


26 689 


28 828 


274 


27 365 


9 652 


304 


248 


29 275 


81 


6 861 


26 


6 692 


30 857 


35 473 


33 421 


37 013 


12 500 


32 300 



1 274 


116 


110 


45 


193 


179 


11 


9 


129 


78 


210 


84 


58 


52 


914 


77 


120 


106 


116 


183 


162 


98 


23 


29 


26 357 


31 025 


697 


29 129 


12 080 


914 


734 


33 112 


276 


5 799 


50 


2 367 


36 538 


39 315 


39 988 


41 205 


14 433 


14 130 



746 


793 


963 


846 


723 


755 


274 


697 


606 


714 


885 


694 


602 


656 


215 


555 


313 


431 


545 


431 


377 


366 


138 


319 


162 


151 


273 


87 


72 


142 


62 


85 


662 


630 


904 


710 


651 


623 


238 


586 


550 


577 


852 


617 


543 


560 


205 


499 


274 


297 


513 


350 


319 


325 


118 


281 


149 


108 


257 


87 


58 


135 


50 


82 


57 


129 


52 


108 


59 


108 


23 


74 


42 


108 


33 


57 


46 


80 


5 


38 


20 


105 


32 


61 


52 


31 


12 


23 


13 


33 


16 


- 


8 


- 


12 


3 


424 


363 


207 


235 


267 


187 


30 


225 


263 


268 


174 


187 


221 


159 


30 


217 


113 


100 


36 


51 


66 


55 


13 


131 


743 


2 631 


3 285 


2 997 


2 608 


2 539 


895 


2 354 


593 


633 


976 


820 


665 


639 


216 


544 


593 


633 


965 


820 


665 


639 


216 


544 


407 


465 


707 


631 


505 


505 


146 


441 


274 


236 


200 


283 


195 


272 


104 


344 


50 


90 


73 


45 


47 


41 


28 


46 


6.7 


11.3 


7.6 


5.3 


6.5 


5.4 


10.2 


6.6 


18 


57 


54 


15 


26 


32 


5 


12 


40 


83 


51 


22 


32 


19 


11 


20 


30 


36 


46 


- 


7 


5 


11 


_ 


27 


49 


56 


18 


28 


27 


12 


34 


10 


31 


49 


7 


20 


22 


- 


12 


27 


42 


38 


- 


20 


9 


6 


18 


17 


24 


38 


- 


7 


5 


6 


_ 


23 


33 


17 


27 


19 


14 


16 


12 


8 


18 


5 


8 


6 


10 


5 


_ 


13 


33 


13 


22 


12 


10 


5 


2 


13 


12 


8 


- 


- 


_ 


5 


_ 


213 


111 


53 


68 


34 


55 


10 


97 


156 


64 


45 


47 


28 


55 


10 


97 


29 


28 


28 


28 


28 


20 


5 


84 


400 


398 


268 


169 


202 


184 


109 


256 


14.6 


15.1 


8.2 


5.6 


7.7 


7.2 


12.2 


10.9 


94 


144 


83 


23 


69 


36 


15 


37 


94 


144 


72 


23 


69 


36 


15 


37 


62 


95 


21 


23 


60 


25 


5 


37 


29 


40 


55 


51 


43 


24 


24 


109 


211 


146 


134 


41 


71 


14 


19 


63 


424 


538 


418 


355 


304 


274 


116 


295 



74 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 21 Occupation, Income in 1989, and Poverty Status in 1989 of White Persons: 1990- 

[Threshold and complementary threshold are 400 persons. Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



■Con. 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 19 



Tract 20 


Tract 22.01 


Tract 22.02 


1 225 




748 




821 


76 




81 




101 


103 




66 




169 


29 




23 




35 


147 




135 




154 


130 




136 




102 


- 




11 




- 


17 




19 




_ 


108 




56 




44 


45 




7 




18 


254 




119 




112 


189 




68 




39 


28 




8 




24 


99 




19 




23 


974 




571 




749 


64 




59 




59 


132 




98 




86 


102 




53 




68 


263 




109 




158 


200 




75 




53 


133 




111 




143 


67 




43 




127 


7 




11 




4 


6 




12 




51 


21 486 


20 


792 


25 


673 


25 042 


26 91 


41 


005 


794 




357 




535 


24 830 


29 934 


36 


318 


8 991 


11 


868 


17 


307 


974 




571 




749 


794 




429 




581 


25 540 


28 03 


42 


162 


207 




219 




244 


6 958 


5 


660 


7 


770 


72 




48 




39 


4 420 


3 


756 


4 872 


27 915 


35 


597 


50 315 


28 551 


35 


340 


48 980 


29 838 


38 854 


56 


800 


31 462 


37 


776 


55 


272 


16 718 


21 


237 


18 264 


17 949 


18 928 


8 435 



Tract 23 


Tract 24.98 


1 141 


1 192 


65 


112 


53 


128 


41 


9 


115 


171 


212 


160 


- 


7 


- 


41 


60 


65 


36 


61 


278 


162 


161 


193 


67 


53 


53 


30 


924 


952 


93 


71 


125 


150 


125 


110 


175 


184 


204 


215 


122 


130 


64 


75 


12 


14 


4 


3 


20 877 


22 969 


23 871 


25 817 


744 


757 


26 127 


26 399 


8 794 


9 410 


924 


952 


776 


744 


24 214 


27 150 


247 


285 


5 680 


6 403 


83 


75 


3 794 


2 752 


27 647 


28 806 


26 440 


29 219 


29 253 


30 093 


27 347 


30 788 


14 528 


22 444 


13 149 


20 985 



Tract 25 



Tract 26 



OCCUPATION 

Employed persons 16 years and over 

Executive, administrative, and managerial occupations 

Professional specialty occupations 

Technicians and related support occupations 

Sales occupations 

Administrative support occupations, including clerical 

Private household occupations 

Protective service occupations 

Service occupations, except protective and household 

Farming, forestry, and fishing occupations 

Precision production, craft, and repair occupations 

Machine operators, assemblers, and inspectors 

Transportation and material moving occupations 

Handlers, equipment cleaners, helpers, and laborers 

INCOME IN 1989 

Households 

Less than $5,000 

$5,000 to $9,999 

$10,000 to $14,999 

$15,000 to $24,999 

$25,000 to $34,999 

$35,000 to $49,999 

$50,000 to $74,999 

$75,000 to $99,999 

$100,000 or more 

Median (dollars) 

Mean (dollars) 

Families 

Median income (dollars) 

Per capita income (dollars) 

INCOME TYPE IN 1989 

Households 

With earnings 

Mean earnings (dollars) 

With Social Security income 

Mean Social Security income (dollars) 

With public assistance income 

Mean public assistance income (dollars) 

MEAN FAMILY INCOME IN 1989 BY FAMILY TYPE 
Families (dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

Married-couple families (dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

Female householder, no husband present 
(dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

POVERTY STATUS IN 1989 

All Income Levels In 1989 

Families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Married-couple families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Unrelated individuals for whom poverty status is 

determined 

Nonfamily householder 

65 years and over 

Persons for whom poverty status is determined _ 

Persons under 18 years 

Related children under 18 years 

Related children 5 to 17 years 

Persons 65 years and over 

Income In 1989 Below Poverty Level 

Families 

Percent below poverty level 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Married-couple families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Unrelated individuals 

Nonfamily householder 

65 years and over 

Persons 

Percent below poverty level 

Persons under 18 years 

Related children under 18 years 

Related children 5 to 17 years 

Persons 65 years and over 

Ratio of income in 1989 to poverty level: 

Persons below 50 percent of poverty level 

Persons below 125 percent of poverty level 



1 


948 




151 




204 




44 




147 




286 




2 




17 




115 




107 




408 




286 




53 




128 


1 


550 




149 




169 




177 




334 




242 




264 




135 




26 




54 


22 


275 


33 


120 


1 


200 


28 851 


12 


008 


1 


550 


1 


250 


36 298 




408 


6 


510 




98 


3 404 


38 476 


35 


133 


41 


351 


37 


766 


19 301 


16 


278 



892 


105 


67 


18 


112 


168 


6 


59 


47 


154 


131 


6 


19 


676 


55 


47 


63 


147 


126 


161 


65 


12 


25 867 


30 725 


561 


27 373 


11 380 


676 


532 


34 856 


209 


6 075 


61 


2 008 


34 442 


42 862 


35 046 


44 067 


20 812 


18 800 



665 


41 


65 


21 


114 


98 


7 


55 


47 


100 


74 


21 


22 


579 


61 


86 


68 


99 


72 


101 


61 


12 


19 


21 205 


29 907 


420 


29 900 


11 996 


579 


457 


30 054 


183 


6 529 


32 


4 814 


36 022 


32 941 


39 222 


37 357 


19 925 


14 978 



1 200 


794 


357 


535 


744 


757 


561 


420 


959 


627 


279 


419 


620 


584 


494 


334 


647 


370 


156 


211 


370 


419 


285 


219 


214 


120 


20 


86 


125 


157 


96 


71 


1 029 


656 


291 


446 


652 


637 


536 


348 


831 


523 


258 


374 


566 


519 


474 


286 


546 


280 


128 


174 


333 


346 


271 


175 


183 


97 


11 


76 


112 


142 


91 


59 


138 


99 


66 


83 


68 


90 


21 


66 


99 


70 


21 


39 


41 


47 


16 


44 


76 


56 


28 


37 


24 


53 


10 


42 


25 


12 


9 


10 


3 


11 


5 


12 


425 


235 


247 


242 


204 


233 


120 


184 


350 


180 


214 


214 


180 


195 


115 


159 


168 


72 


124 


115 


98 


87 


84 


90 


4 292 


2 692 


1 367 


1 738 


2 505 


2 542 


1 786 


1 414 


1 259 


670 


268 


370 


665 


666 


423 


380 


1 259 


668 


268 


370 


659 


666 


423 


377 


963 


492 


228 


244 


504 


513 


303 


291 


473 


295 


253 


353 


268 


332 


247 


214 


129 


88 


27 


42 


89 


88 


28 


42 


10.8 


11.1 


7.6 


7.9 


12.0 


11.6 


5.0 


10.0 


59 


39 


19 


- 


64 


23 


20 


22 


81 


30 


19 


30 


60 


48 


6 


28 


25 


8 


11 


10 


14 


14 


6 


7 


112 


64 


27 


17 


59 


62 


28 


24 


47 


29 


19 


- 


47 


19 


20 


14 


64 


15 


19 


5 


44 


32 


6 


14 


23 


- 


11 


- 


11 


8 


6 


3 


17 


24 


- 


25 


30 


22 




16 


12 


10 


- 


- 


17 


4 


_ 


8 


17 


15 


- 


25 


16 


12 


_ 


14 


2 


8 


- 


10 


3 


2 


_ 


4 


168 


89 


67 


69 


105 


72 


53 


72 


132 


64 


60 


50 


96 


57 


53 


53 


105 


51 


51 


24 


41 


37 


53 


36 


686 


385 


167 


182 


389 


382 


119 


210 


16.0 


14.3 


12.2 


10.5 


15.5 


15.0 


6.7 


14.9 


219 


99 


33 


38 


98 


119 


15 


68 


219 


97 


33 


38 


98 


119 


15 


65 


187 


69 


10 


27 


81 


111 


8 


54 


138 


96 


73 


39 


57 


93 


80 


39 


298 


107 


22 


104 


118 


200 


26 


83 


911 


590 


280 


262 


621 


551 


196 


302 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 75 



Table 22. Social and Labor Force Characteristics of Black Persons: 1990 

[Threshold is 400 persons. Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Florence, SC 
MSA 



Florence County 



Total Florence city 



Totals for split tracts/BNA's in Florence County 



Tract 2.01 



Tract 3 



Tract 5 



Tract 7 



Tract 8 



Tract 9 



Tract 10 



PLACE OF BIRTH 

All persons 

Native 

Foreign born 

LANGUAGE SPOKEN AT HOME AND ABILITY TO 
SPEAK ENGLISH 

Linguistically isolated households 

Persons 5 years and over 

Speak a language other than English 

Do not speak English "very well" 

In linguistically isolated households 

SCHOOL ENROLLMENT AND TYPE OF SCHOOL 

Persons 3 years and over enrolled in school 
Preprimary school 

Public school 

Elementary or high school 

Public school 

College 

Public college 

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT 

Persons 25 years and over 

Less than 9th grade 

9th to 12th grade, no diploma 

High school graduate (includes equivalency) 

Some college, no degree 

Associate degree 

Bachelor's degree 

Graduate or professional degree 

Percent high school graduate or higher 

Percent bachelor's degree or higher 

FERTILITY 

Children ever born per 1,000 women 15 to 44 years .. 

RESIDENCE IN 1985 

Persons 5 years and over 

Same house 

Different house in United States 

Central city of this MSA/PMSA 

Remainder of this MSA/PMSA 

Different MSA/PMSA 

Not in an MSA/PMSA 

Abroad 

JOURNEY TO WORK 

Workers 16 years and over 

Car, truck, or van 

Drove alone 

Carpooled 

Public transportation 

Other means 

Worked at home 

Mean travel time to work (minutes) 

Worked in MSA/PMSA of residence 

Central city 

Outside central city 

Worked outside MSA/PMSA of residence 

LABOR FORCE STATUS 

Persons 16 years and over 

In labor force 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Percent of civilian labor force 

Females 16 years and over 

Employed 

Unemployed 

With own children under 6 years 

In labor force 

With own children 6 to 17 years only 

In labor force 

Persons 16 to 19 years 

Not enrolled in school 

Unemployed or not in labor force 

Not high school graduate 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Not in labor force 

WORK STATUS IN 1989 

Persons 16 years and over who worked in 
1989 

Usually worked 35 or more hours per week 

50 to 52 weeks 

DISABILITY 

Gvilian noninsritutionalized persons 16 to 64 
years 

With o mobility or self-care limitation 

Wth a mobility limitation 

In labor force 

With a self-care limitation 

With a work disability 

In labor force 

Prevented from working 

No work disability 

In labor force 

Civilian noninstftutionalized persons 65 years 

and over 

With a mobility or self-care limitation 

With a mobility limitation 

With a self-care limitation 



44 266 

44 182 
84 



35 



1 540 



44 266 

44 182 
84 



35 



540 



40 061 


40 061 


24 592 


24 592 


15 388 


15 388 


5 217 


5 217 


6 698 


6 698 


1 795 


1 795 


1 678 


1 678 


81 


81 


16 100 


16 100 


14 283 


14 283 


9 682 


9 682 


4 601 


4 601 


595 


595 


1 123 


1 123 


99 


99 


19.5 


19.5 


14 156 


14 156 


7 339 


7 339 


6 817 


6 817 


1 944 


1 944 


30 155 


30 155 


18 203 


18 203 


16 384 


16 384 


1 736 


1 736 


9.6 


9.6 


17 161 


17 161 


8 641 


8 641 


1 034 


1 034 


3 100 


3 100 


2 134 


2 134 


3 751 


3 751 


2 848 


2 848 


3 231 


3 231 


668 


668 


427 


427 


386 


386 


83 


83 


78 


78 


225 


225 


18 632 


18 632 


14 816 


14 816 


9 387 


9 387 


25 671 


25 671 


3 877 


3 877 


1 396 


1 396 


329 


329 


3 415 


3 415 


3 078 


3 078 


696 


696 


2 224 


2 224 


22 593 


22 593 


17 054 


17 054 


3 870 


3 870 


1 386 


1 386 


1 070 


1 070 


886 


886 



14 045 

14 Oil 
34 



40 061 


40 061 


12 724 


1 034 


1 034 


348 


423 


423 


94 


39 


39 


6 


14 465 


14 465 


4 176 


789 


789 


202 


656 


656 


185 


11 686 


11 686 


3 348 


11 488 


11 488 


3 261 


1 990 


1 990 


626 


1 775 


1 775 


527 


23 650 


23 650 


7 818 


5 827 


5 827 


2 196 


6 002 


6 002 


1 849 


7 190 


7 190 


2 288 


2 203 


2 203 


704 


803 


803 


258 


1 127 


1 127 


375 


498 


498 


148 


50.0 


50.0 


48.3 


6.9 


6.9 


6.7 



1 391 



12 724 



4 896 

4 111 
2 736 



375 

386 
364 
35 
16.3 
573 
179 
394 
323 



9 949 

5 653 

5 028 

604 

10.7 

5 752 

2 764 

360 

896 

561 

1 136 

906 

1 025 

239 

187 

184 

29 

55 

100 



5 887 

4 509 
2 685 



8 051 

1 406 

591 

132 

1 242 

1 085 

245 

815 

6 966 

5 205 

1 437 

538 
425 
302 



452 

452 



388 

28 



174 

6 
6 
134 
134 
34 
34 



225 

19 
52 
68 
13 
31 
29 
13 

68.4 

18.7 



938 



388 

154 

234 

155 

13 

46 

20 



180 

176 
140 
36 

4 



13.2 
166 

110 
56 

14 



292 

207 

183 

16 

8.0 

168 

120 

7 

54 

37 

36 

17 

39 



224 

189 
149 



269 

59 

26 

42 

47 

9 

38 
222 
180 

15 



2 384 

2 367 
17 



2 210 

45 
37 



873 

44 
28 
653 
613 
176 
146 



1 327 

90 
265 
372 
166 
122 
181 
131 

73.2 
23.5 



506 



2 210 

1 422 
783 
249 
225 
137 
172 
5 

1 078 

1 040 

836 

204 

12 

26 

18.1 
952 
619 
333 
126 



1 655 

1 204 

1 098 

106 

8.8 

955 

586 

64 

158 

124 

256 

231 

205 

34 

16 

10 



1 246 

1 032 
660 



1 515 

264 
45 
16 
239 
100 
21 
62 
415 
153 



1 074 4 159 5 656 

1 074 4 159 5 656 



i 4i: 



i i: 



140 

46 
21 
37 



960 

21 
6 



465 

19 
19 
249 
234 
197 
197 



449 

45 

95 

215 

53 
25 
16 

68.8 
3.6 



1 314 



960 

257 
703 
284 
177 
89 
153 



487 

408 
351 

57 
6 

65 
8 
17.6 
455 
268 
187 

32 



739 

537 

506 

31 

5.8 

443 

266 

14 

99 

54 

99 

81 

119 

25 

14 

12 

5 



577 

444 
283 



721 

26 

6 

26 
28 

22 

6 

693 

515 

18 

5 



3 722 

104 
26 



1 241 

87 
87 
933 
918 
221 
196 



2 285 

806 

528 

568 

172 

60 

98 

53 

41.6 
6.6 

1 418 



3 722 

2 376 

1 346 

758 

318 

224 

46 



1 301 

975 

571 

404 

110 

191 

25 

16.7 

1 241 

942 

299 

60 



2 906 

1 526 

1 346 

180 

11.8 

1 699 

758 

110 

274 

162 

350 

293 

277 

65 

52 

54 

7 

16 

31 



1 580 

1 147 
631 



2 273 

427 

198 

5 

377 

376 

58 

318 

1 897 

1 419 

479 

205 
158 
138 



5 185 

134 
51 



1 711 

83 

75 

1 424 

1 395 

204 

186 



) 113 

739 

849 

I 070 

234 

66 
112 

43 

49.0 
5.0 



1 407 



5 185 

2 934 

2 238 

1 788 

226 

124 

100 

13 



2 168 

1 905 

1 431 
474 
167 

82 

14 

16.9 

2 025 
1 376 

649 
143 



027 

441 

205 

236 

9.7 

338 

196 

112 

362 

213 

489 

383 

481 

71 

59 

48 

7 

34 

7 



2 505 

1 922 
1 221 



467 

474 
248 
72 
365 
456 
136 
303 
Oil 
226 

560 

195 
145 
84 



3 974 630 

3 967 619 
7 11 



3 681 

92 
28 

6 



1 110 

69 
64 
902 
898 
139 
86 



2 341 

738 
580 
668 
171 
67 
81 
36 

43.7 
5.0 



1 380 



3 681 

2 695 
986 
490 
223 
121 
152 



1 328 

1 143 

641 

502 

92 

93 

15.1 
1 226 
848 
378 
102 



2 907 

1 586 

1 360 

199 

12.8 

1 660 

730 

112 

180 

116 

309 

222 

273 

86 

57 

72 

15 

9 

48 



1 525 

1 196 
682 



2 277 

407 

180 

50 

338 

312 

74 

230 

1 965 

1 424 

477 

158 
135 

101 



529 

48 
14 



152 

21 
21 
131 
131 



314 

49 
72 
118 

53 
15 

7 

61.5 
2.2 



1 242 



529 

142 
382 
194 
47 
62 
79 
5 



187 

135 
91 
44 
16 
36 

20.3 
174 
126 
48 

13 



403 

208 

195 

13 

6.3 

203 

132 

13 

52 

42 

45 

33 

20 

7 

7 

7 



292 

231 
148 



253 

66 

21 

8 

66 

28 

28 
225 
201 

22 

7 
7 



76 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 22. Social and Labor Force Characteristics of Black Persons: 1990— Con. 

[Threshold is 400 persons. Doto based on somple and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Totals for split tracts/BNA's in Florence County- 
Con. 



Tract 1 1 



Tract 15.01 



Tract 16.01 



Florence city, Florence County 



Tract 7 (pt.) Tract 8 (pt.) Tract 9 (pt.) Tract 10 (pt.) Tract 11 (pt.) 



Remainder of Florence County 



Tract 2.01 

(pt.) Tract 3 (pt.) 



PLACE OF BIRTH 

All persons 

Native 

Foreign born 

LANGUAGE SPOKEN AT HOME AND ABILITY TO 
SPEAK ENGLISH 

Linguistically isolated households 

Persons 5 years and over 

Speak a language other than English 

Do not speak English "very well" 

In linguistically isolated households 

SCHOOL ENROLLMENT AND TYPE OF SCHOOL 

Persons 3 years and over enrolled in school 
Preprimary school 

Public school 

Elementary or high school 

Public school 

College 

Public college 

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT 

Persons 25 years and over 

Less than 9th grade 

9th to 12th grade, no diploma 

High school graduate (includes equivalency) 

Some college, no degree 

Associate degree 

Bachelor's degree 

Graduate or professional degree 

Percent high school graduate or higher 

Percent bachelor's degree or higher 

FERTILITY 

Children ever born per 1,000 women 15 to 44 years .. 

RESIDENCE IN 1985 

Persons 5 years and over 

Same house 

Different house in United States 

Central city of this MSA/PMSA. 

Remainder of this MSA/PMSA 

Different MSA/PMSA 

Not in an MSA/PMSA 

Abrond 

JOURNEY TO WORK 

Workers 16 years and over 

Car, truck, or van 

Drove alone 

Carpooled 

Public transportation 

Other means 

Worked at home 

Mean travel time to work (minutes) 

Worked in MSA/PMSA of residence 

Central city 

Outside central city 

Worked outside MSA/PMSA of residence 

LABOR FORCE STATUS 

Persons 16 years and over 

In labor force 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Percent of civilian labor force 

Females 16 years and over 

Employed 

Unemployed 

With own children under 6 years 

In labor force 

With own children 6 to 17 years only 

In labor force 

Persons 16 to 19 years 

Not enrolled in school 

Unemployed or not in labor force 

Not high school graduate 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Not in labor force 

WORK STATUS IN 1989 

Persons 16 years and over who worked in 
1989 

Usually worked 35 or more hours per week 

50 to 52 weeks 

DISABILITY 

Civilian noninstrrutionalized persons 16 to 64 
years 

With a mobility or self-care limitation 

With a mobility limitation 

In labor force 

With a self-care limitation 

With a work disability 

In labor force 

Prevented from working 

No work disability 

In labor force 

Civilian noninstrrutionalized persons 65 years 

and over 

With a mobility or self-care limitation 

With a mobility limitation 

With a self-care limitation 



874 

874 



767 

7 



314 



254 

245 

60 

60 



464 

74 

114 

160 

56 

13 

42 

5 

59.5 
10.1 



1 362 



767 

159 

608 

365 

144 

72 

27 



368 

313 

173 

140 

55 



13.9 
353 
208 
145 

15 



575 

389 

384 

5 

1.3 

344 

196 

5 

91 

49 

58 

45 

59 

31 

21 

12 



426 

297 
203 



494 



52 

20 

32 

442 

362 

49 

34 
28 
19 



2 111 

2 111 



11 

1 929 

56 
39 

11 



721 

30 
20 

575 
575 
116 
112 



1 113 

123 
297 

415 

138 

76 

60 

4 

62.3 
5.8 



715 



1 929 

1 461 

463 

13 

376 

27 

47 

5 



850 

811 

566 

245 

14 

17 

8 

20.9 

735 

394 

341 

115 



1 412 

909 

864 

39 

4.3 

779 

475 

23 

103 

88 

220 

200 

173 

53 

18 

21 

13 



941 

790 
534 



1 253 

177 

89 

3 

168 

148 

6 

134 

1 105 

897 

153 

57 
35 
57 



1 261 

1 261 



1 080 

30 
30 



435 

20 
14 
387 
387 
28 
20 



602 

111 
83 

227 
99 
37 
45 

67.8 
7.5 



430 



1 080 

455 
625 
209 
280 
47 
89 



513 

498 
352 
146 

15 

17.7 
455 
280 
175 
58 



754 

553 

523 

30 

5.4 

425 

263 

30 

152 

127 

77 

69 

78 

23 

12 



565 

489 
311 



673 

101 



101 
43 

43 
630 
553 

64 

18 
11 
7 



2 807 

2 807 



2 544 

73 

17 



788 

28 
28 

593 
578 
167 
147 



1 622 

656 
369 
340 

114 
47 
59 
37 

36.8 
5.9 



369 



2 544 

1 524 

1 020 

626 

154 

199 

41 



816 

546 
313 
233 

87 
168 

15 
17.2 
772 
642 
130 

44 



2 059 

992 

837 

155 

15.6 

1 193 

472 

103 

174 

106 

222 

186 

198 

51 

44 

46 

7 

16 

23 



1 031 

69) 

338 



1 538 

367 

164 

343 
320 
48 
272 
1 218 
905 

367 

163 
123 
118 



5 419 

5 419 



4 948 

134 
51 



1 652 

83 

75 

1 365 

1 336 

204 

186 



2 931 

720 
798 
999 
208 

66 
112 

28 

48.2 
4.8 



1 402 



4 948 

2 784 

2 151 

1 723 

218 

110 

100 

13 



2 036 

1 791 

1 336 

455 

160 

71 

14 

16.8 

1 915 

1 301 

614 

121 



3 823 

2 299 

2 073 

226 

9.8 

2 238 

1 136 

112 

362 

213 

466 

366 

477 

71 

59 

48 

7 

34 

7 



2 357 

1 819 
1 130 



3 271 

445 

219 

64 

360 

421 

122 

282 

2 850 

2 098 

552 

187 

145 
76 



3 382 

3 375 
7 



3 136 

56 
12 
6 



930 

44 

39 

782 

778 

104 

64 

2 016 

672 

466 
558 
151 
63 
75 
31 

43.6 
5.3 

1 418 



136 

291 
845 
405 
177 
111 
152 



1 085 

938 

509 

429 

68 

79 

15.1 
995 
668 
327 
90 

2 487 

1 321 

1 116 

184 

14.2 

1 409 

578 

106 

151 

97 

259 

196 

231 

76 

53 

68 

15 

5 

48 



1 288 

1 038 
582 



1 934 

344 

147 

44 

296 

248 

53 

187 

1 686 

1 197 

406 

133 
115 
82 



630 

619 
11 



529 

48 

14 



152 

21 
21 
131 
131 



314 

49 
72 
118 
53 
15 
7 

61.5 
2.2 



1 242 

529 

142 
382 
194 
47 
62 
79 
5 



187 

135 

91 
44 
16 
36 

20.3 

174 

126 

48 

13 



403 

208 

195 

13 

6.3 

203 

132 

13 

52 

42 

45 

33 

20 

7 

7 

7 



292 

231 
148 



253 

66 
21 
8 
66 
28 

28 
225 
201 

22 

7 
7 



874 

874 



767 

7 



314 



254 

245 

60 

60 



464 

74 
114 
160 
56 
13 
42 
5 

59.5 

10.1 



362 



767 

159 
608 
365 
144 
72 
27 



368 

313 
173 
140 
55 



13.9 
353 
208 
145 

15 



575 

389 

384 

5 

1.3 

344 

196 

5 

91 

49 

58 

45 

59 

31 

21 

12 



426 

297 
203 



494 



52 
20 
32 

442 
362 

49 

34 
28 

19 



442 

442 



378 

28 



174 

6 
6 
134 
134 
34 
34 



215 

19 
52 
68 
13 
31 
19 
13 

67.0 
14.9 



1 007 



378 

154 
224 
155 
13 
36 
20 



170 

166 

130 

36 

4 



13.1 

156 

100 

56 

14 



282 

197 

173 

16 

8.5 

158 

110 

7 

54 

37 

36 

17 

39 



214 

179 
139 



259 

49 
26 

32 
47 
9 
38 
212 
170 

15 



2 012 

1 995 
17 



1 854 

45 
37 



700 

36 
20 

518 
485 
146 
134 



I 121 

79 
252 
302 
131 

89 
137 
131 

70.5 
23.9 



509 



1 854 

1 135 
714 
231 
225 
127 
131 
5 



934 

896 

713 

183 

12 

26 

18.4 
821 
557 
264 
113 



1 413 

1 028 

938 

90 

8.8 

802 

500 

48 

139 

105 

201 

176 

179 

34 

16 

10 

8 



1 055 

876 

540 



1 295 

257 
38 
16 

239 

93 

21 

55 

1 202 

977 

118 

46 
21 
37 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 77 



Table 22. Social and Labor Force Characteristics of Black Persons: 1990— Con. 

[Threshold is 400 persons. Dota based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 4 



Tract 5 (pt.) 



Tract 7 (pt.) 



Tract 9 (pt.) 



Tract 15.01 
(pt.) 



Tract 15.02 



Tract 16.01 
(pt.) 



Tract 16.02 



Troct 17 



PUCE OF BIRTH 

All persons 

Native 

Foreign born 

LANGUAGE SPOKEN AT HOME AND ABILITY TO 
SPEAK ENGLISH 

Linguistically isolated households 

Persons 5 years and over 

Speak a language other than English 

Do not speak English "very well" 

In linguistically isolated households 

SCHOOL ENROLLMENT AND TYPE OF SCHOOL 

Persons 3 years and over enrolled in school 
Preprimary school 

Public school 

Elementary or high school 

Public school 

College 

Public college 

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT 

Persons 25 years and over 

Less than 9th grade 

9th to 12th grade, no diploma 

High school graduate (includes equivalency) 

Some college, no degree 

Associate degree 

Bachelor's degree 

Graduate or professional degree 

Percent high school graduate or higher 

Percent bachelor's degree or higher 

FERTILITY 

Children ever born per 1,000 women 15 to 44 years .. 

RESIDENCE IN 1985 

Persons 5 years and over 

Same house 

Different house in United States 

Central city of this MSA/PMSA 

Remainder of this MSA/PMSA.. 

Different MSA/PMSA 

Not in an MSA/PMSA 

Abroad 

JOURNEY TO WORK 

Workers 16 years and over 

Car, truck, or van 

Drove alone 

Carpooled 

Public transportation 

Other means 

Worked at home 

Mean travel time to work (minutes) 

Worked in MSA/PMSA of residence 

Central city 

Outside central city 

Worked outside MSA/PMSA of residence 

LABOR FORCE STATUS 

Persons 16 years and over 

In labor force 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Percent of civilian labor force 

Females 16 years and over 

Employed 

Unemployed 

With own children under 6 years 

In labor force 

With own children 6 to 17 years only 

In labor force 

Persons 16 to 19 years 

Not enrolled in school 

Unemployed or not in labor force 

Not high school graduate 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Not in labor force 

WORK STATUS IN 1989 

Persons 16 years and over who worked in 
1989 

Usually worked 35 or more hours per week 

50 to 52 weeks 

DISABILITY 

Civilian noninstitutionalized persons 16 to 64 

years 

With a mobility or self-care limitation 

With a mobility limitation 

In labor force 

With a self -core limitation 

With a work disability 

In labor force 

Prevented from working 

No work disability 

In labor force 

Civilian noninstitutionalized persons 65 years 

and over 

With a mobility or self-care limitation 

With a mobility limitation 

With a self-care limitation 



1 316 

1 316 



1 654 



1 074 

1 074 



1 314 



1 352 

1 352 



1 521 



592 

592 



2 111 

2 111 



1 421 

1 421 



1 195 

1 195 



1 182 



1 715 



1 527 



1 388 



1 265 

1 265 



1 386 



1 116 

1 116 



1 155 


960 


1 178 


545 


1 929 


1 304 


1 045 


1 164 


1 043 


23 


21 


31 


36 


56 


19 


30 


33 


29 


6 


6 


9 


16 


39 


- 


30 


25 




6 


_ 


- 


- 


11 


- 


- 




- 


340 


465 


453 


180 


721 


525 


414 


422 


342 


25 


19 


59 


25 


30 


46 


6 


32 


10 


18 


19 


59 


25 


20 


46 


- 


27 


10 


272 


249 


340 


120 


575 


402 


380 


328 


308 


268 


234 


340 


120 


575 


402 


380 


328 


277 


43 


197 


54 


35 


116 


77 


28 


62 


24 


38 


197 


49 


22 


112 


77 


20 


55 


24 


642 


449 


663 


325 


1 113 


788 


574 


719 


668 


96 


45 


150 


66 


123 


128 


97 


178 


167 


119 


95 


159 


114 


297 


254 


83 


110 


179 


184 


215 


228 


110 


415 


253 


219 


276 


188 


124 


53 


58 


20 


138 


77 


99 


77 


96 


30 


25 


13 


4 


76 


25 


31 


29 


19 


69 


16 


39 


6 


60 


42 


45 


34 


19 


20 


- 


16 


5 


4 


9 


- 


15 




66.5 


68.8 


53.4 


44.6 


62.3 


51.5 


68.6 


59.9 


48.2 


13.9 


3.6 


8.3 


3.4 


5.8 


6.5 


7.8 


6.8 


2.8 



198 



1 155 


960 


1 178 


545 


1 929 


1 304 


1 045 


1 164 


1 043 


450 


257 


852 


404 


1 461 


875 


428 


904 


748 


698 


703 


326 


141 


463 


399 


617 


260 


295 


163 


284 


132 


85 


13 


132 


201 


62 


38 


338 


177 


164 


46 


376 


240 


280 


149 


225 


92 


89 


25 


10 


27 


12 


47 


43 


21 


105 


153 


5 


- 


47 


15 


89 


6 


11 


7 


- 


- 


- 


5 


30 


- 






532 


487 


485 


243 


850 


591 


505 


531 


433 


474 


408 


429 


205 


811 


576 


490 


493 


408 


363 


351 


258 


132 


566 


503 


352 


375 


270 


111 


57 


171 


73 


245 


73 


138 


118 


138 


- 


6 


23 


24 


14 


- 


_ 


6 




58 


65 


23 


14 


17 


8 


15 


23 


17 


- 


8 


10 


- 


8 


7 


_ 


9 


8 


17.8 


17.6 


15.9 


15.1 


20.9 


20.7 


17.7 


24.3 


24.4 


440 


455 


469 


231 


735 


549 


447 


514 


394 


348 


268 


300 


180 


394 


315 


272 


218 


155 


92 


187 


169 


51 


341 


234 


175 


296 


239 


92 


32 


16 


12 


115 


42 


58 


17 


39 


881 


739 


847 


420 


1 412 


979 


726 


918 


780 


612 


537 


534 


265 


909 


639 


545 


577 


482 


543 


506 


509 


244 


864 


598 


515 


528 


437 


69 


31 


25 


15 


39 


30 


30 


39 


37 


11.3 


5.8 


4.7 


5.8 


4.3 


4.8 


5.5 


6.9 


7.8 


493 


443 


506 


251 


779 


565 


404 


509 


438 


229 


266 


286 


152 


475 


311 


255 


240 


234 


54 


14 


7 


6 


23 


19 


30 


27 


18 


103 


99 


100 


29 


103 


87 


146 


121 


57 


72 


54 


56 


19 


88 


57 


127 


99 


47 


137 


99 


128 


50 


220 


129 


77 


64 


104 


108 


81 


107 


26 


200 


no 


69 


41 


85 


104 


119 


79 


42 


173 


106 


78 


95 


67 


40 


25 


14 


10 


53 


_ 


23 


5 


5 


29 


14 


8 


4 


18 


_ 


12 


5 




27 


12 


8 


4 


21 


- 


_ 


5 


_ 


11 


5 


- 


- 


13 


_ 


_ 






- 


- 


- 


4 


8 


- 


- 


5 


_ 



629 


577 


549 


237 


941 


662 


551 


568 


489 


557 


444 


456 


158 


790 


504 


481 


506 


441 


350 


283 


293 


100 


534 


381 


311 


350 


273 


825 


721 


735 


343 


1 253 


826 


652 


771 


627 


127 


26 


60 


63 


177 


66 


86 


222 


54 


24 


6 


34 


33 


89 


29 


8 


29 


37 


9 


- 


5 


6 


3 


10 


_ 


20 


14 


118 


26 


34 


42 


168 


66 


86 


220 


31 


78 


28 


56 


64 


148 


66 


36 


73 


81 


16 


22 


10 


21 


6 


25 


_ 


11 


25 


48 


6 


46 


43 


134 


28 


36 


59 


56 


747 


693 


679 


279 


1 105 


760 


616 


698 


546 


590 


515 


514 


227 


897 


581 


545 


548 


439 


56 


18 


112 


71 


153 


142 


57 


118 


145 


18 


5 


42 


25 


57 


58 


11 


63 


34 


18 


- 


35 


20 


35 


58 


11 


33 


34 


11 


5 


20 


19 


57 


43 


- 


48 


19 



78 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 22. Social and Labor Force Characteristics of Black Persons: 1990— Con. 

[Threshold is 400 persons. Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 18 



Tract 19 



Tract 20 



Tract 22.01 



Tract 22.02 



Tract 23 



Tract 24.98 



Tract 25 



Tract 26 



PLACE OF BIRTH 

All persons 

Native 

Foreign born 

LANGUAGE SPOKEN AT HOME AND ABILITY TO 
SPEAK ENGLISH 

Linguistically isolated households 

Persons 5 /ears ond over 

Speak a language other than English 

Do not speak English "very well" 

In linguistically isolated households 

SCHOOL ENROLLMENT AND TYPE OF SCHOOL 

Persons 3 years ond over enrolled in school 
Preprimary school 

Public school 

Elementary or high school 

Public school 

College 

Public college 

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT 

Persons 25 years and over 

less than 9th grade 

9th to 12th grade, no diploma 

High school graduate (includes equivalency) 

Some college, no degree 

Associate degree 

Bachelor's degree 

Graduate or professional degree 

Percent high school graduate or higher 

Percent bachelor's degree or higher 

FERTILITY 

Children ever born per 1,000 women 15 to 44 years -- 

RESIDENCE IN 1985 

Persons 5 years and over 

Same house 

Different house in United States 

Central city of this MSA/PMSA 

Remainder of this MSA/PMSA 

Different MSA/PMSA 

Not in an MSA/PMSA 

Abroad 

JOURNEY TO WORK 

Workers 16 years and over 

Car, truck, or van 

Drove alone 

Carpooled 

Public transportation 

Other means 

Worked at home 

Mean travel time to work (minutes) 

Worked in MSA/PMSA of residence 

Central city 

Outside central city 

Worked outside MSA/PMSA of residence 

LABOR FORCE STATUS 

Persons 16 years and over 

In labor force 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Percent of civilian labor force 

Females 16 years and over 

Employed 

Unemployed 

With own children under 6 years 

In labor force 

With own children 6 to 17 years only 

In labor force 

Persons 16 to 19 years 

Not enrolled in school 

Unemployed or not in labor force 

Not high school graduate 

Employed 

Unemployed 

Not in labor force 

WORK STATUS IN 1989 

Persons 16 years and over who worked in 
1989 

Usually worked 35 or more hours per week 

50 to 52 weeks 

DISABILITY 

Civilian noninstitutionalized persons 16 to 64 

years 

With a mobility or self-care limitation 

With a mobility limitation 

In labor force 

With a self-care limitation 

With a work disability 

In labor force 

Prevented from working 

No work disability 

In labor force 

Civilian noninstitutionalized persons 65 years 

and over 

With a mobility or self-care limitation 

With a mobility limitation 

With a self-care limitation 



1 111 

1 111 



1 790 



1 809 

1 809 



1 695 



1 561 

1 550 
11 



4 331 

4 331 



1 510 

1 510 



569 

565 
4 



1 258 

1 258 



2 483 



1 658 



1 639 



2 034 



1 879 



1 239 

1 239 



1 947 



2 180 

2 179 



1 028 


1 648 


1 336 


3 961 


1 360 


530 


1 112 


1 119 


1 985 


30 


42 


54 


46 


35 


8 


3 


30 


82 


14 


22 


37 


5 


7 


4 


3 


6 


58 


5 


~~ 


" 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


450 


528 


563 


1 601 


564 


169 


367 


433 


666 


16 


50 


52 


65 


. 30 


6 


41 


_ 


25 


16 


48 


52 


36 


25 


- 


22 


_ 


22 


376 


449 


429 


1 423 


490 


140 


317 


397 


543 


373 


449 


429 


1 409 


490 


140 


317 


397 


541 


58 


29 


82 


113 


44 


23 


9 


36 


98 


49 


29 


82 


113 


39 


23 


9 


21 


85 


569 


945 


697 


2 240 


802 


339 


628 


634 


1 169 


198 


276 


242 


653 


281 


108 


227 


158 


284 


161 


282 


244 


604 


267 


100 


128 


297 


255 


142 


318 


148 


670 


178 


90 


215 


133 


427 


39 


57 


47 


161 


21 


17 


31 


27 


92 


9 


10 


13 


60 


5 


18 


2 




31 


12 


2 


3 


46 


50 


6 


16 


19 


54 


8 


- 


- 


46 


- 


- 


9 


- 


26 


36.9 


41.0 


30.3 


43.9 


31.7 


38.6 


43.5 


28.2 


53.9 


3.5 


.2 


.4 


4.1 


6.2 


1.8 


4.0 


3.0 


6.8 



1 526 



1 028 


1 648 


1 336 


3 961 


1 360 


530 


1 112 


1 119 


1 985 


600 


1 152 


819 


2 483 


789 


466 


741 


780 


1 524 


428 


490 


517 


1 478 


571 


64 


368 


339 


454 


- 


- 


- 


- 


54 


- 


- 


7 


44 


342 


263 


462 


1 183 


404 


59 


308 


219 


330 


41 


43 


33 


207 


65 


4 


4 


19 


41 


45 


184 


22 


88 


48 


1 


56 


94 


39 


- 


6 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


3 


- 


7 


375 


664 


499 


1 295 


359 


240 


429 


447 


719 


352 


615 


399 


1 075 


331 


221 


365 


401 


664 


201 


356 


258 


664 


198 


161 


205 


114 


455 


151 


259 


141 


411 


133 


60 


160 


287 


209 


5 


16 


18 


47 


- 


3 


18 


_ 


6 


18 


33 


82 


164 

9 

22.3 


28 


16 


46 


46 


49 


22.1 


27.4 


21.4 


19.3 


24.1 


22.3 


22.2 


22.7 


335 


355 


410 


1 007 


329 


212 


352 


379 


633 


67 


27 


35 


91 


54 


73 


46 


136 


302 


268 


328 


375 


916 


275 


139 


306 


243 


331 


40 


309 


89 


288 


30 


28 


77 


68 


86 


760 


1 203 


965 


2 727 


1 004 


415 


810 


825 


1 512 


461 


721 


589 


1 517 


430 


271 


483 


492 


813 


395 


656 


500 


1 302 


376 


246 


429 


447 


734 


66 


55 


89 


215 


54 


25 


54 


45 


76 


14.3 


7.7 


15.1 


14.2 


12.6 


9.2 


11.2 


9.1 


9.4 


415 


677 


482 


1 650 


587 


215 


441 


436 


881 


187 


371 


208 


719 


200 


107 


187 


244 


398 


39 


47 


42 


115 


44 


2 


45 


37 


46 


65 


147 


125 


327 


85 


60 


71 


78 


146 


35 


113 


65 


223 


60 


41 


63 


62 


101 


129 


141 


98 


393 


147 


53 


85 


97 


178 


81 


115 


63 


265 


86 


34 


45 


61 


129 


86 


136 


HI 


191 


135 


52 


no 


109 


174 


18 


30 


2) 


- 


27 


10 


58 


29 


27 


8 


15 


11 


- 


21 


10 


31 


18 


20 


11 


15 


14 


- 


17 


10 


22 


18 


8 


4 


- 


5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


2 


2 


— 


- 


— 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


4 


5 


15 


9 


~ 


17 


10 


22 


12 


2 


474 


784 


603 


1 515 


436 


264 


483 


466 


807 


370 


625 


492 


1 189 


341 


221 


349 


356 


627 


210 


355 


337 


785 


255 


151 


152 


234 


430 


672 


1 028 


853 


2 302 


863 


366 


729 


722 


1 249 


147 


77 


151 


316 


59 


42 


111 


154 


174 


12 


29 


87 


112 


36 


5 


30 


18 


88 


- 


13 


34 


19 


- 


_ 


8 


7 


25 


141 


62 


111 


289 


49 


37 


94 


154 


151 


68 


149 


109 


344 


128 


15 


73 


110 


186 


18 


36 


34 


118 


8 


5 


2 


19 


31 


45 


106 


68 


209 


114 


10 


63 


86 


132 


604 


879 


744 


1 958 


735 


351 


656 


612 


1 063 


440 


673 


555 


1 367 


422 


266 


476 


455 


758 


88 


165 


112 


425 


141 


49 


75 


103 


241 


45 


55 


41 


167 


24 


12 


15 


23 


93 


30 


37 


40 


140 


24 


12 


7 


11 


73 


34 


36 


15 


121 


19 


12 


8 


18 


54 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 79 



Table 23. 



Occupation, Income in 1989, and Poverty Status in 1989 of Black Persons: 1990 



[Threshold is 400 persons. Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Florence, SC 
MSA 



Florence County 



Total Florence city 



Totals for split tracts/BNA's in Florence County 



Tract 2.01 



Tract 3 



Tract 5 



Tract 7 



Tract 8 



Tract 9 



Tract 10 



195 

5 
7 
15 



OCCUPATION 

Employed persons 16 years and over 

Executive, administrative, and managerial occupations 

Professional specialty occupations 

Technicians and related support occupations 

Sales occupations 

Administrative support occupations, including clerical 

Private household occupations 

Protective service occupations 

Service occupations, except protective and household 

Farming, forestry, and fishing occupations 

Precision production, craft, and repair occupations 

Machine operators, assemblers, and inspectors 

Transportation and material moving occupations 

Handlers, equipment cleaners, helpers, and laborers 

INCOME IN 1989 

Households 

Less than $5,000 

$5,000 to $9,999 

$10,000 to $14,999 

$15,000 to $24,999 

$25,000 to $34,999 

$35,000 to $49,999 

$50,000 to $74.999.. 

$75,000 to $99,999 

$100,000 or more 

Median (dollars) 

Mean (dollars) 

Families 

Median income (dollars) 

Per capita income (dollars) . 

INCOME TYPE IN 1989 

Households 

With earnings 

Mean earnings (dollars) 

With Social Security income 

Mean Social Security income (dollars) 

With public assistance income 

Mean public assistance income (dollars) 

MEAN FAMILY INCOME IN 1989 BY FAMILY TYPE 
Families (dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

Married-couple families (dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

Female householder, no husband present 
(dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

POVERTY STATUS IN 1989 

All Income Levels In 1989 

Families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Married-couple families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Unrelated individuals for whom poverty status is 

determined 

Nonfamily householder 

65 years and over 

Persons for whom poverty status is determined . 

Persons under 18 years 

Related children under 18 years 

Related children 5 to 17 years 

Persons 65 years and over 

Income In 1989 Below Poverty Level 

Families 

Percent below poverty level 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Married-couple families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Unrelated individuals 

Nonfamily householder 

65 years and over 

Persons 

Percent below poverty level 

Persons under 18 years 

Related children under 18 years 

Related children 5 to 17 years 

Persons 65 years and over 

Ratio of income in 1989 to poverty level: 

Persons below 50 percent of poverty level 

Persons below 125 percent of poverty level 



16 384 

642 
1 218 

346 
1 164 

1 366 
196 
277 

3 335 
706 

2 Oil 

3 107 
1 105 

911 



13 458 

2 466 
2 502 

1 774 

2 715 
1 721 
1 483 

616 
135 
46 

14 964 
19 689 
10 348 
17 190 

6 038 



13 458 

10 357 
21 578 

3 486 

4 790 
3 348 
3 023 



21 995 

22 142 
29 114 

31 507 

13 867 

11 383 



16 384 

642 
1 218 

346 
1 164 



366 
196 
277 
335 
706 
0)1 
107 
105 
911 



13 458 

2 466 
2 502 

1 774 

2 715 
1 721 
1 483 

616 
135 
46 

14 964 
19 689 



10 348 

17 190 

6 038 



13 458 

10 357 
21 578 

3 486 

4 790 
3 348 
3 023 



21 995 

22 142 
29 114 

31 507 

13 867 

11 383 



5 028 

215 

300 

121 

420 

480 

72 

58 

1 342 

52 

545 

826 

361 

236 



4 433 

837 
900 
759 
745 
608 
364 
164 
33 
23 

13 235 
18 219 

3 261 

14 797 

5 919 



4 433 

3 419 

19 438 

1 298 

5 140 

1 078 

2 529 



20 249 

18 247 
28 727 

30 640 

13 443 

9 953 



10 348 


10 348 


3 261 


7 315 


7 315 


2 290 


7 360 


7 360 


2 154 


3 113 


3 113 


907 


5 304 


5 304 


1 380 


4 202 


4 202 


1 058 


3 539 


3 539 


788 


1 379 


1 379 


284 


4 407 


4 407 


1 681 


2 703 


2 703 


1 100 


3 418 


3 418 


1 252 


1 565 


1 565 


584 


4 279 


4 279 


1 643 


3 110 


3 110 


1 172 


1 310 


1 310 


530 


43 389 


43 389 


13 487 


15 674 


15 674 


4 532 


15 657 


15 657 


4 517 


11 506 


11 506 


3 221 


3 870 


3 870 


1 437 


3 490 


3 490 


1 176 


33.7 


33.7 


36.1 


1 685 


1 685 


672 


2 758 


2 758 


930 


1 302 


1 302 


468 


917 


917 


254 


384 


384 


136 


538 


538 


156 


203 


203 


59 


2 365 


2 365 


873 


1 213 


1 213 


520 


2 073 


2 073 


750 


1 034 


1 034 


399 


2 232 


2 232 


805 


1 583 


1 583 


538 


923 


923 


329 


16 087 


16 087 


5 214 


37.1 


37.1 


38.7 


7 012 


7 012 


2 231 


6 995 


6 995 


2 216 


4 939 


4 939 


1 476 


1 864 


1 864 


548 


7 191 


7 191 


2 484 


20 065 


20 065 


6 605 



183 

6 
18 
14 
14 
30 

6 
24 

5 

12 
21 
13 
20 



138 

9 
19 
48 
49 
6 
7 



21 528 

23 560 

100 

21 667 

7 328 



138 

132 

20 806 

11 

6 237 

11 
10 569 



23 790 

27 205 
26 808 

29 171 

19 622 

23 976 



100 

94 
78 
50 
58 
58 
46 
26 
42 
36 
32 
24 

45 

38 

452 

180 

180 

116 

15 



15 

15.0 
15 
10 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
9 
9 
4 



81 

17.9 

31 

31 

25 

5 

25 
98 



1 098 

114 

214 
61 
63 

123 
7 
12 

160 

8 

98 

114 
94 
30 



720 

32 
50 
103 
127 
120 
185 
92 
9 
2 

30 732 

31 219 
606 

34 070 

9 547 



720 

641 
582 
122 
053 
35 
101 



34 510 

36 615 
38 863 

42 503 

18 632 

20 503 



606 

512 
379 
142 
460 
407 
261 

77 
130 

91 
110 

65 

137 

114 

42 

2 370 

802 
802 
633 
140 



56 

9.2 
24 
49 
39 
13 

9 

6 

43 

24 

40 

33 

35 

20 

12 

289 

12.2 

121 

121 

81 

22 

94 
477 



506 

21 
66 

17 
40 

27 
142 



59 
45 

21 



310 

35 
30 
48 
65 
76 
47 
9 



21 667 

21 391 

247 

23 015 

6 494 



310 

277 

22 654 
27 

5 776 
57 

3 222 



23 116 

23 128 

27 280 

28 648 

15 851 

16 344 



247 

216 
204 
91 
157 
150 
114 
45 
90 
66 
90 
46 

96 

63 
11 
915 
371 
371 
257 
18 



56 

22.7 

32 

56 

30 

6 

6 
6 

50 

26 

50 

30 

52 

34 

11 

283 

30.9 

139 

139 

96 

11 

95 
334 



1 346 

25 

70 

63 

138 

102 

21 

26 

360 

18 

188 

217 

60 

58 



1 295 

248 

365 

213 

190 

109 

97 

39 

24 

10 

10 737 

17 316 

937 

12 842 

5 412 



1 295 

921 

19 652 
430 

4 580 
418 

3 315 



19 120 

18 258 
27 590 

34 183 

14 471 

11 295 



937 

632 
651 
313 
316 
197 
186 
72 
535 
379 
425 
219 

594 

358 

187 

3 968 

1 341 

1 341 

914 

479 



418 

44.6 

227 

336 

180 

75 

18 

42 

15 

322 

201 

286 

157 

347 

186 

127 

1 920 
48.4 

802 
802 
528 
231 

833 

2 264 



205 

93 

114 

46 

150 

228 

29 

35 

647 

17 

201 

396 

137 

112 



1 768 

300 

357 

285 

264 

229 

199 

95 

27 

12 

14 058 

20 719 

1 394 

16 211 

6 497 



1 768 

1 419 
21 242 

509 

5 196 

439 

2 398 



22 973 

19 272 
31 723 

30 713 

14 946 

10 961 



1 360 

46 

80 

5 

105 

133 

36 

18 

362 

17 

133 

197 

128 

100 



1 265 

263 
241 
254 
210 
169 
82 
41 

5 

12 362 

16 816 

890 

14 105 

5 460 



1 265 

938 

17 839 

442 

5 230 

281 

1 988 



19 495 

20 556 
26 994 

29 674 

13 376 

10 087 



1 394 


890 


1 051 


529 


925 


560 


368 


182 


634 


391 


513 


291 


370 


237 


134 


70 


692 


445 


491 


207 


508 


285 


222 


107 


473 


442 


374 


375 


204 


147 


5 652 


3 786 


1 887 


1 168 


1 877 


1 168 


1 406 


875 


560 


477 


474 


311 


34.0 


34.9 


291 


148 


373 


229 


175 


96 


138 


72 


75 


42 


80 


51 


37 


12 


331 


217 


216 


100 


293 


172 


138 


84 


222 


213 


159 


179 


118 


105 


2 003 


1 436 


35.4 


37.9 


887 


584 


877 


584 


615 


405 


196 


183 


955 


625 


2 440 


2 027 



86 





23 




21 




11 




7 




168 




33 




34 




23 




25 




32 




13 




8 


13 


636 


17 030 




122 


15 


556 


6 


042 




168 




138 


18 


749 




22 


3 


261 




71 


1 


861 


18 355 


17 


243 


34 938 


28 780 


12 004 


12 


821 



122 

84 
90 
40 
31 
31 
23 
12 
83 
45 
67 
28 

69 

46 

7 

502 

240 

235 

134 

22 



43 

35.2 
13 
35 
15 



43 

13 
35 
15 
31 

16 

151 

30.1 
75 
70 
33 

7 

82 
201 



80 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 23. 



Occupation, Income in 1989, and Poverty Status in 1989 of Black Persons: 1990 -Con 



[Threshold is 400 persons. Dato based on sample ond subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Totals for split tracts/BNA's in Florence County- 
Con. 



Tract 1 1 



Tract 15.01 



Tract 16.01 



Florence city, Florence County 



Tract 7 (pt.) Tract 8 (pt.) Tract 9 (pt.) Tract 10 (pt.) Tract 11 (pt.; 



Remainder of Florence County 



Trod 2.01 
(pt.) 



Tract 3 (pt.) 



OCCUPATION 

Employed persons 16 years and over 

Executive, administrative, and managerial occupations 

Professional specialty occupations 

Technicians and related support occupations 

Sales occupations 

Administrative support occupations, including clerical 

Private household occupations 

Protective service occupations 

Service occupations, except protective and household 

Forming, forestry, and fishing occupations 

Precision production, craft, and repair occupations 

Machine operators, assemblers, ond inspectors 

Transportation and materiol moving occupations 

Handlers, equipment cleaners, helpers, and laborers 

INCOME IN 1989 

Households 

Less than $5,000 

$5,000 to $9,999 

$10,000 to $14,999 — 

$15,000 to $24,999 

$25,000 to $34,999 

$35,000 to $49,999 

$50,000 to $74,999 

$75,000 to $99,999 

$100,000 or more 

Median (dollars) 

Meon (dollars) 

Families 

Median income (dollars) 

Per copito income (dollars) 

INCOME TYPE IN 1989 

Households 

With earnings 

Mean earnings (dollars) 

With Social Security income 

Mean Social Security income (dollars) 

With public assistance income 

Mean public assistance income (dollars) 

MEAN FAMILY INCOME IN 1989 BY FAMILY TYPE 
Families (dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

Married-couple families (dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

Female householder, no husband present 
(dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

POVERTY STATUS IN 1989 
All Income Levels In 1989 

Families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 yeors 

Married-couple families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 yeors 

With related children under 5 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Unrelated individuals for whom poverty status is 

determined 

Nonfamily householder 

65 years and over 

Persons for whom poverty status is determined . 

Persons under 18 years 

Related children under 18 years 

Related children 5 to 17 years 

Persons 65 years and over 

Income In 1989 Below Poverty Level 

Families 

Percent below poverty level 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Married-couple families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Unrelated individuals 

Nonfamily householder 

65 years and over 

Persons 

Percent below poverty level 

Persons under 18 years 

Related children under 18 years 

Related children 5 to 17 yeors 

Persons 65 years and over 

Ratio of income in 1989 to poverty level: 

Persons below 50 percent of poverty level 

Persons below 125 percent of poverty level 



384 

23 
29 
9 
17 
36 



65 
72 
47 
14 



290 

49 
43 
29 
78 
64 
12 
15 



17 308 

19 228 

245 

16 779 

6 770 



290 

249 

20 077 

42 

7 037 

33 

3 889 



19 991 

12 655 
25 221 

22 604 

14 851 

10 382 



245 

188 
159 

91 
103 

75 

31 

9 

115 

94 
108 

70 

73 

45 

7 

842 

337 
337 

230 

49 



77 

31.4 

48 

77 

48 

7 

7 
7 

62 

41 
62 
48 
27 

16 

301 

35.7 

176 
176 
130 



239 
364 



864 

17 
42 
20 
74 
67 
5 
4 
188 
36 
132 
166 
44 
69 



644 

95 
117 

60 
131 

79 
128 

30 
4 

18 587 

22 581 

493 

21 302 

6 694 



644 

486 
26 465 

140 
4 394 

117 
2 741 



26 347 

29 314 
33 964 

38 591 

16 599 

14 157 



493 

387 
382 
133 
289 
240 
228 

85 
176 
135 
133 

36 

199 

151 
47 
2 101 
794 
794 
622 
153 



120 

24.3 

79 

102 

53 

30 

7 

12 

5 

69 

60 

69 

36 

89 

76 

25 

637 

30.3 

300 

300 

209 

65 

198 
737 



523 

32 
22 
32 
69 
38 

11 
90 
9 
59 
115 
35 



370 

17 
34 
48 
96 

57 

102 

16 



22 368 

25 282 

329 

25 179 

7 312 



370 

309 

27 808 

47 

6 520 

45 

3 319 



25 812 

26 932 
30 506 

32 634 

16 500 

14 149 



329 

271 

284 

193 

214 

184 

169 

108 

91 

63 

91 

61 

67 

41 

12 

1 227 

532 

532 

368 

64 



51 

15.5 
32 
51 
32 



227 

18.5 
156 
156 
112 



65 

312 



837 

25 

18 
47 

108 
43 
21 
22 

219 
18 

101 

127 
60 
28 



919 

201 

290 

175 

129 

48 

50 

14 

6 

6 

9 092 

13 981 

608 

11 500 

4 772 



919 

607 
15 522 

334 
4 553 

326 
3 377 



14 772 

11 661 
20 239 

25 536 

12 317 

8 240 



608 

374 

382 

180 

172 

75 

75 

17 

398 

277 

297 

163 

523 

311 
174 
2 618 
788 
788 
533 
367 



327 

53.8 

185 

254 

136 

66 

18 

33 

10 

257 

167 

221 

126 

301 

157 

114 

1 530 

58.4 

607 

607 

393 

186 

679 
1 704 



2 073 

89 

99 

39 

146 

212 

29 

28 

601 

17 

186 

386 

137 

104 



1 680 

300 

332 

268 

256 

224 

186 

82 

20 

12 

13 980 

20 155 

1 332 

15 625 

6 270 



1 680 

1 348 
20 792 

496 

5 242 

425 

2 303 



22 126 

19 040 
30 841 

30 713 

14 682 

10 429 



1 332 

998 
902 
368 
590 
478 
358 
134 
680 
479 
503 
222 

447 

348 

196 

5 415 

1 850 

1 840 

1 369 

552 



465 

34.9 
291 
373 
175 
129 
75 
80 
37 
331 
216 
293 
138 
214 
151 
110 

1 979 
36.5 

887 
877 
615 
188 

955 

2 408 



1 116 

46 
49 
5 
105 
94 
22 

311 
17 
119 
173 
92 
83 



1 073 

223 
186 
223 
187 
152 
69 
28 

5 

12 810 

16 809 

742 

14 688 

5 385 



1 073 

794 

18 250 

366 

5 051 

215 

1 791 



19 642 

21 524 
28 106 

30 824 

12 505 

10 080 



742 

453 
468 
156 
337 
265 
207 

70 
356 
162 
228 

81 

398 

331 
141 
3 194 
978 
978 
732 
406 



243 

32.7 

114 

170 

78 

52 

36 

36 

12 

169 

72 

128 

66 

195 

161 

105 

1 145 

35.8 

436 

436 

295 

167 

474 
1 705 



195 

5 
7 
15 



86 

23 

21 
11 
7 



168 

33 
34 
23 
25 
32 
13 



13 636 

17 030 

122 

15 556 

6 042 



168 

138 

18 749 

22 

3 261 

71 

1 861 



18 355 

17 243 
34 938 

28 780 

12 004 

12 821 



122 

84 
90 
40 
31 
31 
23 
12 
83 
45 
67 
28 

69 

46 

7 

502 

240 

235 

134 

22 



43 

35.2 
13 
35 
15 



43 

13 
35 
15 
31 

16 

151 

30.1 
75 

70 

33 

7 

82 
201 



384 

23 

29 

9 

17 
36 



290 

49 
43 
29 
78 
64 
12 
15 



17 308 

19 228 

245 

16 779 

6 770 



290 

249 

20 077 

42 

7 037 

33 

3 889 



19 991 

12 655 
25 221 

22 604 

14 851 

10 382 



245 

188 
159 

91 
103 

75 

31 

9 

115 

94 
108 

70 

73 

45 

7 

842 

337 
337 
230 
49 



77 

31.4 

48 

77 

48 

7 

7 

7 

62 

41 
62 
48 
27 

16 

301 

35.7 
176 
176 

130 



239 
364 



173 

6 
18 
14 
14 
20 

6 
24 

5 
12 
21 
13 
20 



128 

9 
19 
48 
39 

6 

7 



20 833 
23 292 

100 

21 667 

6 883 



128 

122 

20 299 

11 

6 237 

11 

10 569 



23 790 

27 205 
26 808 

29 171 

19 622 

23 976 



100 

94 
78 
50 
58 
58 
46 
26 
42 
36 
32 
24 

35 

28 

442 

180 
180 

116 
15 



15 

15.0 
15 
10 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
9 
9 
4 



81 

18.3 
31 

31 

25 

5 

25 
98 



938 

114 

182 
61 
56 

105 
7 
12 

134 
8 

62 
85 
82 
30 



618 

32 

50 

79 

112 

85 

163 

86 

9 

2 

31 466 

31 540 

509 

35 363 

9 783 



618 

545 

32 193 

100 

6 805 

35 

5 101 



35 534 

38 219 
40 335 

44 242 

19 674 

21 869 



509 

427 
317 
129 
390 

343 

220 

70 

109 

76 
89 
59 

125 

109 

37 

1 998 

658 
658 
505 
118 



56 

11.0 
24 
49 
39 
13 

9 

6 

43 

24 

40 

33 

35 

20 

12 

289 

14.5 

121 

121 

81 

22 

94 
394 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 81 



Table 23. 



Occupation, Income in 1989, and Poverty Status in 1989 of Black Persons: 1990 -Con. 



[Threshold is 400 persons. Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 















Tract 15.01 






Tract 16.01 




Tract 4 


Tract 5 (pt.) 


Tract 7 (pt.) 


Tract 9 (pt.) 




(pt.) 


Tract 15.02 




(pt.) 


Tract 16.02 


543 




506 


509 




244 




864 




598 




515 


528 


28 




21 


- 




- 




17 




9 




32 


21 


81 




66 


52 




31 




42 




39 




22 


30 


- 




- 


16 




- 




20 




9 




32 




36 




17 


30 




- 




74 




80 




69 


33 


35 




40 


59 




39 




67 




57 




38 


50 


- 




- 


- 




14 




5 




- 




_ 


6 


12 




27 


4 




18 




4 




12 




11 




113 




142 


141 




51 




188 




106 




90 


83 


20 




- 


- 




- 




36 




25 




9 


26 


55 




68 


87 




14 




132 




68 




59 


98 


97 




59 


90 




24 




166 




149 




107 


109 


33 




45 


- 




36 




44 




30 




35 


51 


33 




21 


30 




17 




69 




14 




11 


21 


440 




310 


376 




192 




644 




430 




349 


372 


63 




35 


47 




40 




95 




75 




11 


46 


32 




30 


75 




55 




117 




48 




19 


66 


13 




48 


38 




31 




60 




47 




48 


23 


153 




65 


61 




23 




131 




101 




96 


76 


81 




76 


61 




17 




79 




15 




57 


81 


79 




47 


47 




13 




128 




92 




102 


36 


19 




9 


25 




13 




30 




43 




16 


31 


- 




- 


18 

4 

19 674 




- 




4 




9 




- 


13 


21 655 


21 


667 


10 


114 


18 


587 


17 


163 


25 


179 


21 250 


24 019 


21 


391 


25 466 


16 853 


22 


581 


24 


188 


26 448 


25 Oil 


327 




247 


329 




148 




493 




343 




316 


292 


23 984 


23 


015 


20 781 


10 86 


21 


302 


22 969 


27 


500 


25 366 


8 006 


6 


494 


6 739 


5 


887 


6 694 


7 


687 


7 


612 


7 697 


440 




310 


376 




192 




644 




430 




349 


372 


386 




277 


314 




144 




486 




333 




295 


292 


25 502 


22 


654 


27 634 


15 


569 


26 46 


27 


165 


28 88 


26 417 


37 




27 


96 




76 




140 




154 




40 


102 


4 811 


5 


776 


4 673 


6 08 


4 


394 


4 


217 


6 34 


5 323 


90 




57 


92 




66 




117 




78 




37 


98 


4 092 


3 


222 


3 097 


2 


633 


2 


741 


2 


949 


4 001 


3 478 


25 775 


23 


116 


27 154 


18 


756 


26 347 


27 913 


26 696 


28 569 


27 207 


23 


128 


27 934 


15 


816 


29 


314 


28 807 


27 


569 


32 264 


31 686 


27 280 


36 371 


20 051 


33 964 


29 804 


31 


284 


35 692 


33 434 


28 


648 


40 088 


23 043 


38 


591 


31 


076 


32 


634 


40 813 


12 514 


15 


851 


20 728 


16 858 


16 599 


22 


606 


17 622 


16 078 


14 210 


16 


344 


18 839 


10 


110 


14 


157 


20 


707 


15 


627 


11 782 



OCCUPATION 

Employed persons 16 years and over 

Executive, administrative, and managerial occupations 

Professional specialty occupations 

Technicians and related support occupations 

Sales occupations 

Administrative support occupations, including clerical 

Private household occupations 

Protective service occupations 

Service occupations, except protective and household 

Farming, forestry, and fishing occupations 

Precision production, craft, and repair occupations 

Machine operators, assemblers, and inspectors 

Transportation and material moving occupations 

Handlers, equipment cleaners, helpers, and laborers 

INCOME IN 1989 

Households 

Less than $5,000 

$5,000 to $9,999 

$10,000 to $14,999 

$15,000 to $24,999 

$25,000 to $34,999 

$35,000 to $49,999 

$50,000 to $74,999 

$75,000 to $99,999 

$100,000 or more 

Median (dollars) 

Mean (dollars) 

Families 

Median income (dollars) 

Per capita income (dollars) - 

INCOME TYPE IN 1989 

Households 

With earnings 

Mean eornings (dollars) 

With Social Security income 

Mean Social Security income (dollars) 

With public assistance income 

Mean public assistance income (dollars) 

MEAN FAMILY INCOME IN 1989 BY FAMILY TYPE 
Families (dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

Married-couple families (dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

Female householder, no husband present 
(dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

POVERTY STATUS IN 1989 

All Income Levels In 1989 

Families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Married-couple families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Unrelated individuals for whom poverty status is 

determined 

Nonfamily householder 

65 years and over 

Persons for whom poverty status is determined . 

Persons under 18 years 

Related children under 18 years 

Related children 5 to 17 years 

Persons 65 years and over 

Income In 1989 Below Poverty Level 

Families 

Percent below poverty level 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Married-couple families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Unrelated individuals 

Nonfamily householder 

65 years and over 

Persons 

Percent below poverty level 

Persons under 18 years 

Related children under 18 years 

Related children 5 to 17 years 

Persons 65 years and over 

Ratio of income in 1989 to poverty level: 
Persons below 50 percent of poverty level 

Persons below 125 percent of poverty level 



437 


4 


19 


6 


16 


38 


10 


37 


58 


16 


71 


118 


25 


19 


373 


62 


67 


45 


102 


29 


57 


11 


15 539 


19 008 


279 


17 139 


6 591 


373 


275 


22 109 


126 


3 461 


65 


4 529 


22 969 


25 545 


25 998 


29 694 


11 421 


11 370 



327 


247 


329 


148 


493 


343 


316 


292 


279 


271 


216 


258 


76 


387 


251 


265 


208 


200 


276 


204 


269 


92 


382 


254 


278 


195 


173 


124 


91 


133 


26 


133 


81 


187 


111 


60 


210 


157 


144 


54 


289 


264 


207 


188 


198 


189 


150 


122 


26 


240 


202 


184 


161 


133 


177 


114 


111 


30 


228 


205 


169 


130 


106 


70 


45 


55 


- 


85 


57 


108 


75 


30 


108 


90 


137 


89 


176 


63 


85 


101 


59 


73 


66 


102 


45 


135 


33 


57 


44 


45 


99 


90 


128 


57 


133 


33 


85 


62 


52 


54 


46 


56 


26 


36 


24 


55 


36 


30 


155 


96 


71 


44 


199 


106 


59 


127 


102 


113 


63 


47 


44 


151 


87 


33 


80 


94 


6 


11 


13 


6 


47 


65 


12 


37 


63 


1 316 


915 


1 350 


592 


2 101 


1 421 


1 178 


1 246 


1 116 


494 


371 


553 


190 


794 


513 


511 


416 


371 


494 


371 


553 


190 


794 


513 


511 


416 


371 


333 


257 


381 


143 


622 


396 


361 


315 


298 


56 


18 


112 


71 


153 


142 


57 


118 


145 


78 


56 


91 


68 


120 


82 


45 


74 


68 


23.9 


22.7 


27.7 


45.9 


24.3 


23.9 


14.2 


25.3 


24.4 


32 


32 


42 


34 


79 


38 


26 


26 


21 


58 


56 


82 


59 


102 


60 


45 


41 


28 


39 


30 


44 


18 


53 


16 


26 


27 


15 


11 


6 


9 


20 


30 


43 


_ 


37 


40 


- 


6 


- 


6 


7 


14 


_ 


18 




- 


6 


9 


15 


12 


32 


_ 


11 


7 


- 


- 


5 


- 


5 


6 


_ 


11 




67 


50 


65 


48 


69 


30 


30 


34 


28 


32 


26 


34 


28 


60 


15 


11 


5 


21 


58 


50 


65 


44 


69 


19 


30 


27 


21 


39 


30 


31 


18 


36 


10 


11 


16 


15 


33 


52 


46 


18 


89 


44 


10 


72 


61 


17 


34 


29 


18 


76 


33 


_ 


59 


61 


- 


11 


13 


- 


25 


33 


- 


30 


48 


277 


283 


390 


291 


637 


359 


200 


341 


268 


21.0 


30.9 


28.9 


49.2 


30.3 


25.3 


17.0 


27.4 


24.0 


121 


139 


195 


148 


300 


143 


135 


93 


80 


121 


139 


195 


148 


300 


143 


135 


93 


80 


49 


96 


135 


110 


209 


112 


105 


52 


60 


32 


11 


45 


16 


65 


71 


- 


88 


105 


168 


95 


154 


151 


198 


220 


38 


66 


37 


500 


334 


560 


322 


737 


457 


271 


425 


430 



82 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 23. 



Occupation, Income in 1989, and Poverty Status in 1989 of Black Persons: 1990 



-Con. 



[Threshold is 400 persons. Dota based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 18 



Tract 19 



Tract 20 


Tract 22.01 


Tract 22.02 


500 


1 302 




376 


2 


54 




- 


32 


62 




23 


- 


- 




5 


13 


107 




17 


33 


67 




32 


- 


7 




- 


15 


15 




5 


58 


205 




57 


106 


28 




40 


63 


210 




68 


90 


354 




70 


33 


119 




27 


55 


74 




32 


385 


1 368 




451 


56 


378 




148 


70 


315 




113 


75 


144 




40 


105 


280 




86 


46 


147 




19 


23 


47 




28 


10 


40 




11 


- 


5 




6 


- 


12 




_ 


14 356 


9 763 


7 


754 


16 637 


15 010 


14 039 


339 


1 056 




371 


15 373 


14 013 


9 


139 


4 015 


4 603 


4 


160 


385 


1 368 




451 


315 


917 




257 


17 664 


17 060 


17 


956 


52 


419 




125 


4 053 


4 141 


4 


526 


119 


507 




180 


3 643 


2 982 


2 


887 


17 547 


16 664 


15 


686 


16 396 


16 634 


15 


892 


21 824 


24 325 


22 887 


21 077 


26 478 


30 207 


10 402 


12 209 


8 939 


7 753 


9 079 


8 


566 



Tract 23 



Tract 24.' 



Tract 25 



Tract 26 



OCCUPATION 

Employed persons 16 years and over 

Executive, administrative, and managerial occupations 

Professional specialty occupations 

Technicians and related support occupations 

Sales occupations 

Administrative support occupations, including clerical 

Private household occupations 

Protective service occupations 

Service occupations, except protective and household 

Farming, forestry, and fishing occupations 

Precision production, craft, and repair occupations 

Machine operators, assemblers, and inspectors 

Transportation and material moving occupations 

Handlers, equipment cleaners, helpers, and laborers 

INCOME IN 1989 

Households 

Less than $5,000 

$5,000 to $9,999 

$10,000 to $14,999 

$15,000 to $24,999 

$25,000 to $34,999 

$35,000 to $49,999 - 

$50,000 to $74,999 

$75,000 to $99,999 

$100,000 or more 

Median (dollars) 

Mean (dollars) 

Families 

Median income (dollars) 

Per capita income (dollars) 

INCOME TYPE IN 1989 

Households 

With earnings 

Mean earnings (dollars) 

With Social Security income 

Mean Social Security income (dollars) 

With public assistance income 

Mean public assistance income (dollars) 

MEAN FAMILY INCOME IN 1989 BY FAMILY TYPE 
Families (dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

Married-couple families (dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

Female householder, no husband present 
(dollars) 

With own children under 18 years (dollars) 

POVERTY STATUS IN 1989 

All Income Levels In 1989 

Families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Married-couple families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Unrelated individuals for whom poverty status is 

determined 

Nonfamily householder 

65 years and over 

Persons for whom poverty status is determined. 

Persons under 18 years 

Related children under 18 years 

Related children 5 to 17 years 

Persons 65 years and over 

Income In 1989 Below Poverty Level 

Families 

Percent below poverty level 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Married-couple families 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Female householder, no husband present 

Householder worked in 1989 

With related children under 18 years 

With related children under 5 years 

Unrelated individuals 

Nonfamily householder 

65 years and over 

Persons 

Percent below poverty level 

Persons under 18 years 

Related children under 18 years 

Related children 5 to 17 years 

Persons 65 years and over 

Ratio of income in 1989 to poverty level: 

Persons below 50 percent of poverty level 

Persons below 125 percent of poverty level 



395 


3 


41 


2 


10 


10 


10 


54 


69 


27 


114 


30 


25 


361 


105 


84 


40 


68 


26 


28 


10 


9 194 


13 789 


275 


13 393 


4 464 


361 


264 


15 958 


83 


4 119 


79 


2 183 


15 908 


16 064 


21 242 


23 473 


11 338 


9 882 



656 


17 


8 


7 


62 


30 


11 


19 


82 


31 


98 


231 


17 


43 


521 


104 


99 


74 


103 


47 


58 


36 


14 083 


18 986 


423 


16 964 


5 208 


521 


411 


20 792 


152 


3 883 


157 


3 296 


21 190 


19 319 


28 725 


27 976 


13 613 


8 490 



246 


7 


12 


2 


10 


5 


32 


48 


32 


57 


26 


15 


163 


11 


33 


18 


31 


47 


16 


7 


21 250 


21 693 


124 


26 167 


6 231 


163 


152 


20 762 


43 


3 912 


28 


4 024 


24 537 


24 346 


26 461 


28 030 


19 802 


7 009 



429 

11 
6 

14 
42 
42 

16 
85 
44 
100 
29 
40 



298 



72 


17 


69 


23 


14 


2 


3 


7 898 


13 174 


222 


10 833 


3 340 


298 


207 


14 946 


75 


3 484 


111 


2 542 


14 392 


11 843 


19 582 


17 672 


6 281 


6 520 



447 


20 


13 


31 


7 


14 


85 


77 


45 


101 


28 


26 


297 


60 


85 


31 


43 


29 


41 


8 


10 673 


17 963 


204 


12 917 


4 106 


297 


242 


18 536 


67 


4 992 


95 


4 251 


18 737 


20 356 


22 006 


28 634 


13 874 


9 778 





734 




37 




52 




8 




56 




57 




12 




10 




192 




25 




83 




104 




32 




66 




648 




142 




122 




86 




151 




81 




44 




13 




7 




2 


13 488 


17 


124 




500 


15 


244 


5 


169 




648 




453 


18 4C 




225 


5 


017 




217 


3 


117 


19 


174 


19 


804 


23 


759 


26 430 


13 912 


11 


255 



275 


423 


339 


1 056 


371 


124 


222 


204 


500 


168 


314 


208 


673 


194 


99 


135 


122 


288 


199 


320 


248 


761 


255 


111 


164 


155 


350 


58 


126 


126 


286 


103 


53 


52 


73 


133 


129 


206 


205 


391 


165 


84 


104 


122 


224 


87 


180 


149 


311 


105 


68 


71 


73 


170 


79 


153 


149 


282 


80 


73 


70 


81 


163 


12 


55 


66 


97 


26 


23 


26 


46 


69 


138 


198 


115 


593 


176 


26 


82 


82 


222 


73 


131 


53 


343 


68 


17 


33 


49 


95 


112 


157 


84 


451 


151 


24 


72 


74 


153 


46 


63 


45 


180 


68 


16 


26 


27 


53 


110 


127 


73 


408 


125 


46 


141 


152 


190 


86 


98 


46 


312 


80 


39 


76 


93 


148 


27 


56 


29 


175 


22 


9 


45 


19 


72 


1 HI 


1 807 


1 561 


4 324 


1 510 


569 


1 247 


1 227 


2 144 


397 


660 


638 


1 719 


589 


195 


479 


470 


764 


395 


660 


638 


1 719 


589 


195 


479 


470 


764 


312 


501 


413 


1 349 


439 


156 


333 


350 


579 


88 


165 


112 


425 


141 


49 


75 


103 


241 


129 


150 


133 


489 


217 


19 


122 


103 


186 


46.9 


35.5 


39.2 


46.3 


58.5 


15.3 


55.0 


50.5 


37.2 


59 


90 


53 


183 


62 


19 


45 


47 


82 


97 


129 


118 


382 


149 


19 


103 


92 


145 


32 


62 


81 


146 


75 


8 


35 


25 


57 


41 


35 


50 


67 


73 


12 


43 


52 


66 


12 


23 


34 


15 


25 


12 


13 


20 


37 


19 


17 


41 


54 


18 


12 


33 


41 


40 


3 


8 


34 


11 


10 


6 


9 


13 


11 


82 


113 


72 


384 


131 


7 


69 


51 


106 


41 


67 


19 


163 


28 


7 


27 


27 


45 


72 


110 


68 


309 


118 


7 


60 


51 


97 


29 


54 


38 


135 


56 


2 


26 


12 


44 


78 


80 


45 


336 


104 


4 


96 


56 


114 


65 


62 


27 


251 


59 


3 


62 


41 


87 


25 


48 


27 


166 


22 


_ 


40 


9 


56 


535 


675 


715 


2 235 


917 


93 


815 


585 


810 


48.2 


37.4 


45.8 


51.7 


60.7 


16.3 


65.4 


47.7 


37.8 


235 


275 


377 


1 022 


378 


48 


355 


247 


328 


233 


275 


377 


1 022 


378 


48 


355 


247 


328 


190 


191 


215 


817 


263 


42 


242 


208 


251 


53 


98 


67 


279 


93 


- 


63 


54 


120 


261 


237 


291 


899 


490 


69 


591 


343 


274 


607 


802 


876 


2 599 


1 062 


170 


919 


677 


1 079 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 83 



j? 



Table 24. Social and Labor Force Characteristics of American Indian, Eskimo, or Aleut Persons: 1990 



[The above table was omitted because there were no qualifying areas) 



Table 25. Occupation, Income in 1989, and Poverty Status in 1989 of American Indian, Eskimo, or Aleut Persons: 
1990 

[The above table was omitted because there were no qualifying areas) 



Table 26. Social and Labor Force Characteristics of Asian or Pacific Islander Persons: 1990 



[The above table was omitted because there were no qualifying areas] 



Table 27. Occupation, Income in 1989, and Poverty Status in 1989 of Asian or Pacific Islander Persons: 1990 



[The above table was omitted because there were no qualifying areas] 



Table 28. Social and Labor Force Characteristics of Hispanic Origin Persons: 1990 



[The above table was omitted because there were no qualifying areas] 



Table 29. Occupation, Income in 1989, and Poverty Status in 1989 of Hispanic Origin Persons: 1990 



[The above table was omitted because there were no qualifying areas] 



Table 30. Social and Labor Force Characteristics of White, Not of Hispanic Origin Persons: 1990 



[The above table was omitted because there were no qualifying areas] 



Table 31. Occupation, Income in 1989, and Poverty Status in 1989 of White, Not of Hispanic Origin Persons: 1990 

[The above table was omitted because there were no qualifying areas] 

84 FLORENCE, SC MSA CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 32. Selected Structural Characteristics of Housing Units: 1990 

[Dota based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Florence, SC 
MSA 



Florence County 



Total Florence city 



Totals for split tracts /BNA's in Florence County 



Tract 2.01 



Tract 2.02 



Tract 3 



Tract 5 



Tract 6 



Tract 7 



Tract 8 



All housing units 

YEAR STRUCTURE BUILT 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1960 to 1969 

1950 to 1959 

1940 to 1949 

1939 or earlier 

BEDROOMS 

No bedroom 

1 bedroom 

2 bedrooms 

3 bedrooms 

4 bedrooms 

5 or more bedrooms 

CONDOMINIUM HOUSING UNITS 

Owner-occupied condominium housing units 

Renter-occupied condominium housing units 

Vacant condominium housing units 

SELECTED STRUCTURAL CHARACTERISTICS 

Complete kitchen facilities 

Source of water, public system or private company 

Sewage disposal, public sewer 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Renter-occupied housing units 

Occupied housing units 

HOUSE HEATING FUEL 

Utility gas 

Bottled, tank, or LP gas 

Electricity 

Fuel oil, kerosene, etc. 

All other fuels 

No fuel used 

VEHICLES AVAILABLE 

None 

1 

2 

3 or more 

Vehicles per household 

YEAR HOUSEHOLDER MOVED INTO UNIT 

Owner-occupied housing units 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1969 or earlier 

Renter-occupied housing units 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 _ 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1969 or earlier 

SELECTED CHARACTERISTICS 

No telephone in unit 

Householder 65 years and over 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

No telephone in unit 

No vehicle available 

Complete plumbing facilities 

1.00 or less persons per room 

1.01 or more persons per room 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

1 .00 or less persons per room 

1.01 or more persons per room 

Mean household income in 1989: 

Owner-occupied housing units (dollars) 

Renter-occupied housing units (dollars) 

Household income in 1989 below poverty level 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Renter-occupied housing units 



43 209 



43 209 



11 790 



1 125 


1 125 


231 


4 945 


4 945 


811 


4 836 


4 836 


826 


12 485 


12 485 


2 903 


7 983 


7 983 


2 131 


5 560 


5 560 


2 146 


3 292 


3 292 


1 667 


2 983 


2 983 


1 075 


346 


346 


140 


2 213 


2 213 


1 237 


13 020 


13 020 


3 698 


22 308 


22 308 


5 084 


4 545 


4 545 


1 399 


777 


777 


232 


194 


194 


178 


244 


244 


93 


26 


26 


8 


42 725 


42 725 


11 706 


28 089 


28 089 


11 631 


21 824 


21 824 


11 452 


790 


790 


111 


275 


275 


41 


461 


461 


59 



40 217 



4 184 
3 519 
23 763 
6 482 
2 171 
98 



5 412 
12 869 
14 916 

7 020 
1.6 



28 346 

2 557 

6 298 
4 194 

7 542 
7 755 

11 871 
4 760 
4 040 
1 423 
1 051 
597 



4 100 

8 845 

7 003 

208 

534 

2 256 

39 481 

37 569 

1 912 

736 

603 

133 



35 278 
19 612 
8 255 

3 898 

4 357 



40 217 



4 184 
3 519 
23 763 
6 482 
2 171 
98 



5 412 
12 869 
14 916 

7 020 
1.6 



28 346 

2 557 

6 298 
4 194 

7 542 
7 755 

11 871 
4 760 
4 040 
1 423 
1 051 
597 



4 100 

8 845 

7 003 

208 

534 

2 256 

39 481 

37 569 

1 912 

736 

603 

133 



35 278 
19 612 
8 255 

3 898 

4 357 



11 074 



2 498 

430 

5 794 

2 092 

252 



2 117 

3 919 
3 553 
1 485 

1.4 



355 
465 

216 
730 
659 
285 
719 



732 
554 
375 
178 



1 063 

2 924 
2 156 

44 
179 
820 

10 974 

10 553 

421 

100 

92 



42 515 
21 569 

2 366 
691 

1 675 



765 



31 

116 

207 

283 

97 

28 



42 
196 
302 
176 

49 



765 
684 
282 



728 



17 

24 

642 

39 

6 



19 
131 
419 
159 
2.0 



574 

81 
177 
118 
143 

55 
154 
106 

38 
7 



62 
62 



728 

712 

16 



77 816 

31 234 

35 

24 

11 



1 474 



35 
412 

93 
385 
313 
182 

41 

13 



60 
622 
649 
129 

14 



1 474 
971 
523 



1 403 



7 

70 

1 181 

138 

7 



36 

510 
539 
318 
1.9 



827 

97 

191 

128 

197 

214 

576 

291 

223 

40 

17 

5 



34 

221 
192 



12 

1 403 

1 380 

23 



45 966 
24 784 



26 
62 



1 347 



7 
38 
73 
545 
482 
136 
39 
27 



29 
196 
971 
129 

22 



1 347 

1 020 

259 

4 

4 
1 250 



67 
94 
852 
193 
33 
11 



100 
340 
514 
296 
1.9 



1 029 

69 

169 

174 

390 

227 

221 

71 

81 

22 

8 

39 



52 

191 
174 



1 246 

1 197 

49 

4 



34 719 

25 496 

92 

64 

28 



1 423 



26 

242 
168 
443 
385 
59 
53 
47 



6 

37 

553 

768 

43 

16 



1 409 

683 

384 

21 

II 

4 

1 335 



56 

112 

892 

227 

37 

11 



91 
432 
613 
199 

1.8 



946 

65 

270 

115 

246 

250 

389 

217 

92 

44 

19 

17 



130 

240 
202 



40 

1 320 

1 220 

100 

15 

15 



33 798 
18 041 

224 
66 

158 



1 170 



6 
95 
97 
416 
278 
197 
59 
22 



21 

142 

874 

127 

6 



1 170 
589 
526 



1 142 



77 
897 
132 

36 



54 
280 
515 
293 
2.0 



962 

113 

197 

78 

287 

287 

180 

80 

67 

10 

7 

16 



23 

194 
167 

9 
33 

1 142 
1 142 



34 314 

26 449 

100 

93 

7 



1 543 



35 
89 
96 
598 
282 
215 
126 
102 



7 
244 
540 
580 
151 
21 



1 512 

1 263 

1 168 

57 

14 
37 

1 390 



451 
133 
294 
408 
104 



640 
443 
204 
103 
.9 



609 

30 

52 
62 
186 
279 
781 
281 
231 
102 
121 
46 



340 

445 

266 

17 

58 

242 

1 339 

1 215 
124 
51 
43 



23 626 

12 099 

622 

169 

453 



1 809 



37 
33 
737 
350 
317 
186 
149 



147 
437 
993 
212 
20 



1 805 

1 762 

1 706 

10 

5 

5 

1 744 



410 
136 
710 
418 
70 



586 
562 
354 
242 
1.2 



1 029 

14 

88 

79 

409 

439 

715 

197 

248 

106 

102 

62 



258 

420 

352 

5 

48 

165 

1 734 

1 581 

153 

10 

10 



25 066 

12 987 

658 

246 

412 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 85 



Table 32. Selected Structural Characteristics of Housing Units: 1990— Con. 

[Data bosed on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Totals for split tracts/BNA's in Florence County— Con. 



Tract 9 



Tract 10 



Tract 1 1 



Tract 12 



Tract 13 



Tract 14 



Tract 15.01 



Tract 16.01 



Florence city, Florence County 



Tract 2.01 

(pt.) Tract 2.02 (pt.) 



All housing units 

YEAR STRUQURE BUILT 

1989 to March 1990 — 

1985 to 1988 - 

1980 to 1984 -. 

1970 to 1979 - 

1960 to 1969 

1950 to 1959 

1940 to 1949 

1939 or earlier — 

BEDROOMS 

No bedroom 

1 bedroom 

2 bedrooms 

3 bedrooms 

4 bedrooms 

5 or more bedrooms 

CONDOMINIUM HOUSING UNITS 

Owner-occupied condominium housing units 

Renter-occupied condominium housing units 

Vacant condominium housing units 

SELECTED STRUCTURAL CHARACTERISTICS 

Complete kitchen facilities 

Source of water, public system or private company 

Sewage disposal, public sewer 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Renter-occupied housing units 

Occupied housing units 

HOUSE HEATING FUEL 

Utility gas 

Bottled, tank, or LP gas 

Electricity 

Fuel oil, kerosene, etc. 

All other fuels 

No fuel used 

VEHICLES AVAILABLE 

None 

1 

2 - 

3 or more 

Vehicles per household 

YEAR HOUSEHOLDER MOVED INTO UNIT 

Owner-occupied housing units 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1969 or earlier 

Renter-occupied housing units 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1969 or earlier 

SELECTED CHARACTERISTICS 

No telephone in unit 

Householder 65 years and over 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

No telephone in unit 

No vehicle available 

Complete plumbing facilities 

1 .00 or less persons per room 

1 .01 or more persons per room 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

1 .00 or less persons per room 

1 .01 or more persons per room 

Mean household income in 1989: 

Owner-occupied housing units (dollars) 

Renter-occupied housing units (dollars) 

Household income in 1989 below poverty level 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Renter-occupied housing units 



1 439 



276 



1 072 



114 



2 352 



1 S32 



1 541 



1 751 



1 914 



93 



27 



90 



1 525 



48 



68 



16 



30 


20 


27 


14 


8 


125 


45 


23 


... 


68 


174 


92 


52 


101 


363 


361 


158 


12 


106 


57 


213 


97 


116 


120 


388 


287 


43 


236 


42 


225 


292 


531 


430 


757 


651 


6 


320 


131 


241 


334 


545 


404 


223 


246 


7 


368 


98 


528 


453 


202 


247 


33 


123 




170 


181 


721 


256 


33 


40 


85 


6 


_ 


141 


369 


305 


34 


5 


22 


22 


31 


- 


27 


106 








14 


9 






176 


234 


333 


55 


42 


62 


41 


68 


6 


559 


424 


1 121 


414 


521 


254 


477 


466 


62 


602 


234 


798 


643 


809 


942 


1 062 


881 




66 


28 


100 


330 


136 


441 


305 


100 


_ 


9 


46 




90 


33 


38 


20 


10 


_ 




11 




31 


119 








17 


- 


44 


- 


11 


50 


- 


- 


- 






5 




3 








' 


— 


1 407 


1 047 


2 344 


1 532 


1 541 


1 751 


1 910 


1 516 


68 


1 267 


1 072 


2 352 


1 503 


1 363 


1 688 


891 


1 063 


68 


1 203 


1 072 


2 323 


1 481 


1 105 


1 498 


268 


1 025 


55 


39 


18 


10 


- 


- 


- 


38 


6 




22 


6 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10 


6 


_ 


17 


7 


10 


- 


- 


- 


28 


- 


- 


1 344 


896 


2 195 


1 474 


1 442 


1 715 


1 819 


1 441 


65 


232 


324 


708 


243 


58 


194 


35 


16 




149 


45 


44 


23 


42 


23 


112 


72 


_ 


358 


358 


936 


1 015 


1 144 


1 402 


1 242 


1 188 


65 


522 


156 


490 


181 


193 


88 


298 


133 




83 


13 


9 


12 


5 


8 


132 


32 


- 






8 












" 


477 


269 


214 


46 


117 


58 


88 


89 




516 


383 


1 081 


481 


557 


378 


476 


471 


17 


243 


202 


676 


662 


503 


856 


856 


642 


48 


108 


42 


224 


285 


265 


423 


399 


239 




1.0 


1.0 


1.4 


1.8 


1.7 


2.0 


1.9 


1.8 


1.7 


638 


317 


1 053 


1 040 


973 


1 412 


1 556 


995 


17 


13 


27 


120 


43 


61 


147 


107 


131 


11 


47 


102 


130 


244 


185 


376 


457 


255 


6 


46 


24 


117 


94 


167 


226 


270 


179 




214 


68 


191 


219 


300 


285 


545 


259 


_ 


318 


96 


495 


440 


260 


378 


177 


171 


_ 


706 


579 


1 142 


434 


469 


303 


263 


446 


48 


153 


260 


458 


257 


287 


184 


93 


197 


26 


239 


262 


509 


no 


118 


101 


113 


184 


22 


136 


15 


129 


32 


49 


- 


12 


48 




90 


25 


46 


35 


10 


13 


29 


9 


_ 


88 


17 


- 


- 


5 


5 


16 


8 


- 



16 



1.5 



429 




283 




639 


378 




321 




347 




259 




711 




_ 


8 


262 




160 




477 


333 




293 




303 




224 




168 




_ 


8 


22 




6 




- 


- 




- 




- 




11 




_ 




_ 




77 




- 




- 


6 




- 




_ 




17 




_ 




_ 




185 




91 




132 


26 




52 




41 




44 




37 




- 


- 


1 305 




883 


2 


185 


1 474 


1 


442 


1 


715 


1 


781 


1 


435 




65 


16 


1 159 




852 


2 


161 


1 464 


1 


432 


1 


709 


1 


707 


1 


328 




65 


16 


146 




31 




24 


10 




10 




6 




74 




107 




_ 




39 




13 




10 


- 




- 




- 




38 




6 




_ 


_ 


34 




13 




10 


- 




- 




- 




33 




6 




- 


_ 


5 




- 




- 


_ 




_ 




- 




5 




- 




- 


- 


22 139 


28 542 


35 


741 


68 962 


41 


322 


53 


903 


35 


534 


33 


489 


26 


770 


13 372 


11 184 


21 


315 


23 


416 


26 373 


48 688 


28 481 


16 017 


20 


970 


35 906 


40 300 


553 




155 




298 


117 




147 




132 




290 




185 




_ 




141 




38 




76 


49 




66 




69 




178 




66 




_ 




412 




117 




222 


68 




81 




63 




112 




119 




- 


_ 



86 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 32. Selected Structural Characteristics of Housing Units: 1990— Con. 

[Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Florence city, Florence County— Con. 



Tract 3 (pt.) Tract 5 (pt.) Tract 6 (pt.) Tract 7 (pt.) Tract 8 (pt.) Tract 9 (pt.) Tract 10 (pt.) Tract II (pt.) Tract 12 (pt.) Tract 13 (pt.) 



All housing units 

YEAR STRUCTURE BUILT 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1960 to 1969 

1950 to 1959 

1940 to 1949 

1939 or earlier 

BEDROOMS 

No bedroom 

1 bedroom 

2 bedrooms 

3 bedrooms 

4 bedrooms 

5 or more bedrooms 

CONDOMINIUM HOUSING UNITS 

Owner-occupied condominium housing units 

Renter-occupied condominium housing units 

Vacant condominium housing units 

SELECTED STRUCTURAL CHARACTERISTICS 

Complete kitchen facilities 

Source of water, public system or private company 

Sewage disposal, public sewer 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Renter-occupied housing units 

Occupied housing units 

HOUSE HEATING FUEL 

Utility gas 

Bottled, tank, or LP gas 

Electricity 

Fuel oil, kerosene, etc. 

All other fuels 

No fuel used 

VEHICLES AVAILABLE 

None 

1 

2 

3 or more 

Vehicles per household 

YEAR HOUSEHOLDER MOVED INTO UNIT 

Owner-occupied housing units 

1989 to March 1990 - 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1969 or earlier 

Renter-occupied housing units 

1989 to March 1990. 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1969 or earlier 

SELECTED CHARACTERISTICS 

No telephone in unit 

Householder 65 years and over 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

No telephone in unit 

No vehicle available 

Complete plumbing facilities 

1.00 or less persons per room 

1 .01 or more persons per room 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

1 .00 or less persons per room 

1.01 or more persons per room 

Mean household income in 1989: 

Owner-occupied housing units (dollars) 

Renter-occupied housing units (dollars) 

Household income in 1989 below poverty level 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Renter-occupied housing units 



127 



78 
23 
9 
17 



12 
107 



381 



1 012 



1 736 



1 160 



1 072 



2 352 



127 
127 
95 



117 



12 
82 
15 



34 
83 



1.7 



110 

15 
14 

6 
52 
23 

7 



26 
26 



117 

103 
14 



30 434 
13 000 



300 



258 



232 



114 



93 



1 436 



27 



905 



6 


11 


- 


20 


20 


27 


14 


8 


70 


52 


37 


20 


174 


92 


52 


19 


67 


47 


33 


90 


57 


213 


69 


80 


202 


403 


722 


195 


42 


225 


285 


337 


12 


180 


306 


239 


131 


241 


312 


355 


16 


116 


310 


308 


98 


528 


421 


84 


8 


121 


179 


163 


181 


721 


249 


22 




82 


149 


125 


369 


305 


34 


~ 




7 




27 


106 








- 


217 


147 


171 


234 


333 


45 


18 


36 


336 


425 


445 


424 


1 121 


381 


186 


282 


332 


940 


455 


234 


798 


606 


545 


57 


99 


209 


53 


28 


100 


324 


123 


6 


21 


15 


9 


46 




80 


33 










11 




31 


119 


- 


- 


- 


- 


44 


- 


11 


38 








- 


5 




3 


— 


381 


987 


1 732 


1 138 


1 047 


2 344 


1 436 


905 


374 


1 005 


1 711 


1 121 


1 072 


2 352 


1 414 


886 


369 


975 


1 681 


1 092 


1 072 


2 323 


1 431 


886 


- 


44 


10 


29 


18 


10 


_ 




- 


8 


5 


22 


6 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


30 


5 


7 


7 


10 


- 


- 


375 


928 


1 673 


1 088 


896 


2 195 


1 393 


836 




388 


410 


199 


324 


708 


243 


47 


31 


61 


123 


97 


45 


44 


17 




330 


162 


668 


267 


358 


936 


950 


735 


7 


239 


402 


470 


156 


490 


171 


54 


7 


78 


70 


55 


13 


9 


12 














8 




" 


6 


531 


581 


382 


269 


214 


46 


11 


92 


239 


540 


414 


383 


1 081 


443 


306 


202 


133 


337 


210 


202 


676 


627 


326 


75 


25 


215 


82 


42 


224 


277 


193 


2.0 


.6 


1.2 


1.0 


1.0 


1.4 


1.8 


1.9 


304 


293 


958 


511 


317 


1 053 


994 


612 


69 


4 


14 


- 


27 


120 


43 


42 


118 


15 


84 


40 


102 


130 


236 


132 


47 


45 


67 


46 


24 


117 


87 


125 


70 


82 


399 


168 


68 


191 


219 


203 


- 


147 


394 


257 


96 


495 


409 


110 


71 


635 


715 


577 


579 


1 142 


399 


224 


40 


222 


197 


124 


260 


458 


250 


122 


31 


201 


248 


192 


262 


509 


103 


64 


- 


98 


106 


119 


15 


129 


11 


38 


- 


87 


102 


75 


25 


46 


35 




- 


27 


62 


67 


17 


- 




_ 



25 



24 


311 


410 




358 




283 


639 




360 




185 


24 


153 


342 




211 




160 


477 




315 




174 


- 


11 


5 




22 




6 


_ 










- 


54 


48 




71 




_ 


_ 




6 




_ 


- 


188 


165 




156 




91 


132 




26 




11 


375 


890 


1 663 


1 


059 




883 


2 185 


1 


393 




836 


375 


814 


1 510 




936 




852 


2 161 


1 


393 




836 


- 


76 


153 




123 




31 


24 




_ 






- 


38 


10 




29 




13 


10 




_ 




_ 


~ 


30 
8 


10 




29 




13 


10 




- 




- 


39 536 


22 418 


24 931 


21 


801 


28 


542 


35 741 


70 


392 


49 


068 


30 287 


10 712 


12 987 


11 


397 


21 


315 


23 416 


26 309 


78 


545 


8 


485 


643 




455 




155 


298 




117 




91 


8 


79 


231 




122 




38 


76 




49 




38 


- 


406 


412 




333 




117 


222 




68 




53 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 87 



Table 32 Selected Structural Characteristics of Housing Units: 1990-Con. 

[Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



All housing units.. 
YEAR STRUCTURE BUILT 



1989 to March 1990. 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1960 to 1969 

1950 to 1959 

1940 to 1949 

1939 or earlier 



BEDROOMS 



No bedroom 

1 bedroom 

2 bedrooms 

3 bedrooms 

4 bedrooms 

5 or more bedrooms. 



CONDOMINIUM HOUSING UNITS 

Owner-occupied condominium housing units . 
Renter-occupied condominium housing units . 
Vacant condominium housing units 



SELECTED STRUCTURAL CHARACTERISTICS 



Complete kitchen facilities 

Source of water, public system or private company 

Sewage disposal, public sewer 

Locking complete plumbing facilities 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Renter-occupied housing units 



Occupied housing units . 
HOUSE HEATING FUEL 



Utility gas 

Bottled, tank, or LP gas . 

Electricity 

Fuel oil, kerosene, etc. .. 

All other fuels 

No fuel used 



VEHICLES AVAILABLE 



None 

1 — 

2 ... 



3 or more 

Vehicles per household 



YEAR HOUSEHOLDER MOVED INTO UNIT 



Owner-occupied housing units. 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1969 or earlier 

Renter-occupied housing units . 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1969 or earlier 



SELECTED CHARACTERISTICS 



No telephone in unit 

Householder 65 years and over 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities. 

No telephone in unit 

No vehicle available 



Complete plumbing facilities 

1 .00 or less persons per room 

1.0) or more persons per room 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

1 .00 or less persons per room 

1.01 or more persons per room 

Mean household income in 1989: 

Owner-occupied housing units (dollars) 

Renter-occupied housing units (dollars) 

Household income in 1989 below poverty level . 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Renter-occupied housing units 



Florence city, Florence County— Con. 



Tract 14 (pt.) Tract 15.01 (pt.) Tract 16.01 (pt.) 



1 398 



125 
283 

96 

341 

309 

227 

6 

11 



26 

189 

755 

406 

22 



1 398 
1 392 
1 372 



1 369 



171 

1 131 

59 

8 



27 
327 
663 
352 
2.0 



1 157 

120 
318 
166 
199 
354 
212 
166 
41 



281 
266 



1 369 
1 369 



56 557 

31 482 

77 

50 

27 



127 



Remainder of Florence County 



Tract 1 Tract 2.01 (pt.) Tract 2.02 (pt.) 



1 567 



Tract 3 (pt.) 



57 

318 

332 

686 

118 

24 

20 

12 



11 
330 
862 
286 

78 



16 

24 

6 



697 



31 
104 
164 
277 
90 
28 



36 
134 
302 
176 

49 



1 458 



35 

412 
93 

385 
305 
174 

41 
13 



60 

606 

649 

129 

14 



1 220 



Tract 4 



1 676 



7 


35 


38 


331 


73 


177 


467 


783 


459 


242 


127 


72 


22 


29 


27 


7 




125 


21 


85 


184 


544 


864 


797 


129 


105 


22 


20 



127 


1 567 


697 


1 458 


1 220 


1 676 


101 


1 348 


616 


963 


893 


1 198 


101 


941 


227 


523 


164 


510 


_ 




— 


- 


4 


11 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


11 


123 


1 487 


663 


1 387 


1 133 


1 446 


_ 




17 


7 


59 


13 


— 


44 


24 


70 


82 


56 


102 


1 349 


577 


1 173 


770 


1 136 


21 


58 


39 


130 


178 


165 


_ 


36 


6 


7 


33 


71 










11 


5 


50 


7 


19 


36 


100 


120 


35 


345 


114 


502 


306 


505 


38 


770 


371 


531 


431 


635 


- 


365 


159 


318 


296 


186 


.9 


2.1 


2.1 


1.9 


1.9 


1.6 


21 


1 198 


557 


819 


919 


970 


- 


252 


70 


97 


54 


147 


21 


461 


171 


191 


155 


255 


- 


191 


118 


128 


168 


207 


- 


221 


143 


189 


338 


240 


- 


73 


55 


214 


204 


121 


102 


289 


106 


568 


214 


476 


15 


198 


80 


291 


71 


356 


52 


49 


16 


223 


74 


69 


30 


35 


7 


32 


22 


23 


5 


- 


- 


17 


8 


12 




7 


3 


5 


39 


16 


8 


25 


7 


34 


52 


193 


39 


114 


62 


213 


165 


139 


- 


106 


62 


184 


148 


126 






~ 


- 


- 


11 


33 


- 


6 


12 


14 


13 


123 


1 487 


663 


1 387 


1 129 


1 435 


123 


1 477 


647 


1 364 


1 094 


1 334 


- 


10 


16 


23 


35 


101 


— 


_ 


- 


- 


4 


11 




~~ 


- 


- 


- 


11 






— 


- 


4 


- 


26 000 


48 003 


79 374 


46 284 


35 232 


31 750 


9 676 


26 907 


29 119 


24 566 


25 904 


13 551 


37 


100 


35 


88 


92 


296 


- 


60 


24 


26 


64 


70 


37 


40 


11 


62 


28 


226 



88 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 32. Selected Structural Characteristics of Housing Units: 1990— Con. 

[Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions ot terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con, 



Tract 5 (pt.) 



Tract 6 (pt.) 



Tract 7 (pt.) Troct 8 (pt.) Tract 9 (pt.: 



Tract 10 (pt.) 



Tract II (pt.) 



Tract 12 (pt.) 



All housing units 

YEAR STRUCTURE BUILT 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 - 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1960 to 1969 - 

1950 to 1959 

1940 to 1949 

1939 or earlier— 

BEDROOMS 

No bedroom 

1 bedroom 

2 bedrooms 

3 bedrooms 

4 bedrooms 

5 or more bedrooms 

CONDOMINIUM HOUSING UNITS 

Owner-occupied condominium housing units 

Renter-occupied condominium housing units 

Vacant condominium housing units 

SELECTED STRUCTURAL CHARACTERISTICS 

Complete kitchen facilities 

Source of water, public system or private company 

Sewage disposal, public sewer 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Renter-occupied housing units 

Occupied housing units 

HOUSE HEATING FUEL 

Utility gas 

Bottled, tank, or LP gas 

Electricity 

Fuel oil, kerosene, etc. 

All other fuels 

No fuel used 

VEHICLES AVAILABLE 

None 

1 

2 - 

3 or more 

Vehicles per household 

YEAR HOUSEHOLDER MOVED INTO UNIT 

Owner-occupied housing units 

1989 to March 1990 - 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1969 or earlier.. 

Renter-occupied housing units 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1969 or earlier 

SELECTED CHARACTERISTICS 

No telephone in unit 

Householder 65 years and over 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

No telephone in unit 

No vehicle available 

Complete plumbing facilities 

1 .00 or less persons per room 

1.01 or more persons per room 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

1 .00 or less persons per room 

1.01 or more persons per room 

Mean household income in 1989: 

Owner-occupied housing units (dollars) 

Renter-occupied housing units (dollars) 

Household income in 1989 below poverty level 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Renter-occupied housing units 



1 423 



789 



531 



73 



279 



26 


- 


24 


_ 


10 


242 


25 


37 


- 


48 


168 


30 


49 


_ 


16 


443 


214 


195 


15 


41 


385 


266 


102 


44 


81 


59 


181 


99 


7 


60 


53 


51 


5 


7 


7 


47 


22 


20 




16 


6 

37 


21 


27 


- 


5 


553 


106 


204 


12 


114 


768 


592 


248 


53 


147 


43 


70 


52 


3 


13 


16 


- 


- 


5 


- 



409 


789 


525 


73 


269 


683 


215 


258 


51 


146 


384 


157 


193 


25 


111 


21 


- 


13 


- 


10 


11 


- 


6 


- 


- 


4 


- 


7 


- 


10 


335 


767 


462 


71 


256 


56 




63 




33 


112 


46 


72 


13 


52 


892 


567 


132 


42 


91 


227 


125 


169 


16 


52 


37 


29 


26 


- 


28 


11 








" 


91 


48 


109 


5 


95 


432 


188 


204 


22 


102 


613 


313 


71 


17 


33 


199 


218 


78 


27 


26 


1.8 


2.0 


1.3 


2.0 


1.0 


946 


658 


316 


71 


127 


65 


44 


26 


- 


13 


270 


79 


37 


4 


7 


115 


31 


17 


12 


- 


246 


217 


104 


10 


46 


250 


287 


132 


45 


61 


389 


109 


146 


_ 


129 


217 


40 


59 


- 


29 


92 


36 


30 


- 


47 


44 


10 


4 


- 


17 


19 


7 


34 


- 


15 


17 


16 


19 


- 


21 



130 



40 



44 



240 




170 




134 


10 




71 


202 




143 




113 
6 
4 


10 




51 


_ 




9 




_ 




6 


40 




33 




54 


- 




29 


1 320 




767 




449 


71 




246 


1 220 




767 




401 


71 




223 


100 




- 




48 


- 




23 


15 




- 




13 


_ 




10 


15 




_ 




13 


- 




5 

5 


33 798 


31 


901 


24 


746 


26 897 


23 497 


18 041 


23 


949 


18 


132 


- 


10 


279 


224 




92 




137 


15 




98 


66 




85 




90 


15 




19 


158 




7 




47 


- 




79 



96 



28 
7 

22 
32 

7 



10 
33 
37 

6 

10 



96 
89 
50 



81 



6 

65 
10 



38 
35 



1.6 



46 



31 
35 

7 

7 

21 



81 
71 
10 



38 062 
27 107 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 89 



Table 32. Selected Structural Characteristics of Housing Units: 1990— Con. 

[Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



All housing units 

YEAR STRUCTURE BUILT 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1960 to 1969 

1950 to 1959 

1940 to 1949 

1939 or earlier 

BEDROOMS 

No bedroom 

1 bedroom 

2 bedrooms 

3 bedrooms 

4 bedrooms 

5 or more bedrooms 

CONDOMINIUM HOUSING UNITS 

Owner-occupied condominium housing units 

Renter-occupied condominium housing units 

Vacant condominium housing units 

SELECTED STRUCTURAL CHARACTERISTICS 

Complete kitchen facilities 

Source of water, public system or private company 

Sewage disposal, public sewer 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Renter-occupied housing units 

Occupied housing units 

HOUSE HEATING FUEL 

Utility gas 

Bottled, tank, or LP gas 

Electricity 

Fuel oil, kerosene, etc. 

All other fuels 

No fuel used 

VEHICLES AVAILABLE 

None 

1 

2 

3 or more 

Vehicles per household 

YEAR HOUSEHOLDER MOVED INTO UNIT 

Owner-occupied housing units 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1969 or earlier 

Renter-occupied housing units 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1969 or earlier 

SELECTED CHARACTERISTICS 

No telephone in unit 

Householder 65 years and over 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

No telephone in unit 

No vehicle available 

Complete plumbing facilities 

1 .00 or less persons per room 

1.01 or more persons per room 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

1 .00 or less persons per room 

1.01 or more persons per room 

Mean household income in 1989: 

Owner-occupied housing units (dollars) 

Renter-occupied housing units (dollars) 

Household income in 1 989 below poverty level 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Renter-occupied housing units 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 13 (pt.) 



Tract 14 (pt.) Tract 15.01 (pt.) 



Tract 15.02 Tract 16.01 (pt.) 



Tract 16.02 



90 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



636 



65 



353 



1 914 



1 598 



1 398 



1 401 



108 



112 



40 



100 



Tract 17 



737 



132 



Tract 18 



1 382 



636 


353 


1 910 


1 576 


1 389 


1 387 


715 


1 374 


477 


296 


891 


685 


962 


196 


33 


485 


219 


126 


268 


150 


924 


65 


4 


460 


- 


- 


38 


37 


6 


28 


22 


19 


- 


- 


10 


19 


6 


23 


8 


8 


- 


- 


28 


13 


- 


- 


14 


11 


606 


346 


1 819 


1 508 


1 318 


1 310 


675 


1 283 


11 


23 


35 


49 


16 


6 




105 


42 


23 


112 


141 


72 


163 


109 


212 


409 


271 


1 242 


909 


1 086 


672 


315 


615 


139 


29 


298 


289 


112 


313 


176 


174 


5 


- 


132 


115 


32 


147 


68 


171 








5 




9 


7 


6 


106 


31 


88 


150 


39 


114 


84 


166 


251 


51 


476 


289 


436 


379 


227 


388 


177 


193 


856 


683 


604 


517 


199 


433 


72 


71 


399 


386 


239 


300 


165 


296 


1.4 


1.9 


1.9 


2.0 


1.9 


1.9 


1.8 


1.8 


361 


255 


1 556 


1 271 


974 


1 097 


534 


995 


19 


27 


107 


119 


131 


91 


37 


65 


53 


58 


457 


309 


234 


260 


156 


226 


42 


60 


270 


218 


179 


189 


98 


93 


97 


86 


545 


349 


259 


241 


158 


279 


150 


24 


177 


276 


171 


316 


85 


332 


245 


91 


263 


237 


344 


213 


141 


288 


165 


18 


93 


65 


182 


53 


33 


101 


54 


60 


113 


85 


132 


64 


18 


105 


11 


- 


12 


39 


18 


24 


80 


20 


10 


13 


29 


34 


4 


44 


10 


53 


5 


- 


16 


14 


8 


28 




9 



166 



136 




66 




259 




361 




172 




289 


165 


327 


119 




37 




224 




328 




168 




256 


124 


272 


- 




- 




11 




12 




_ 




_ 




6 


- 




- 




17 




16 




- 




22 


14 


19 


41 




23 




44 




106 




4 




79 


40 


80 


606 




346 


1 


781 


1 


476 


1 


312 


1 


287 


653 


1 264 


596 




340 


1 


707 


1 


407 


1 


205 


1 


236 


619 


1 204 


10 




6 




74 




69 




107 




51 


34 


60 


- 




- 




38 




32 




6 




23 


22 


19 


- 




- 




33 




32 




6 




23 


22 


17 


" 




~~ 




5 




_ 




- 




- 


- 


2 


8 189 


41 


865 


35 


534 


32 


598 


33 


651 


30 


592 


26 212 


28 498 


1 389 


21 


489 


16 017 


23 


072 


24 


319 


24 


614 


14 317 


16 901 


56 




55 




290 




209 




148 




264 


163 


339 


28 




19 




178 




140 




66 




199 


120 


204 


28 




36 




112 




69 




82 




65 


43 


135 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



- 


- 


45 


79 


23 


56 


8 


68 


82 


80 


361 


278 


158 


185 


82 


196 


36 


24 


388 


268 


256 


181 


120 


93 


194 


89 


757 


518 


584 


312 


262 


338 


190 


95 


223 


227 


238 


208 


95 


245 


118 


20 


33 


111 


102 


209 


46 


189 


11 


34 


85 


23 


6 


113 


77 


82 


5 


11 


22 


94 


31 


137 


47 


171 




14 


9 






14 




11 


24 


36 


41 


24 


36 


_ 


35 


28 


335 


65 


477 


459 


401 


419 


229 


345 


264 


187 


1 062 


909 


851 


798 


411 


864 


13 


35 


305 


183 


100 


170 


56 


122 




16 


20 


23 


10 




6 


12 



Table 32. Selected Structural Characteristics of Housing Units: 1990— Con. 

(Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 19 



Tract 20 



Tract 22.01 



Trod 22.02 



Tract 23 



Tract 24.98 



Tract 25 



Tract 26 



All housing units 

YEAR STRUaURE BUILT 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1960 to 1969 

1950 to 1959 

1940 to 1949 

1939 or earlier 

BEDROOMS 

No bedroom 

1 bedroom 

2 bedrooms 

3 bedrooms 

4 bedrooms 

5 or more bedrooms 

CONDOMINIUM HOUSING UNITS 

Owner-occupied condominium housing units 

Renter-occupied condominium housing units 

Vacant condominium housing units 

SELECTED STRUCTURAL CHARACTERISTICS 

Complete kitchen facilities 

Source of water, public system or private company 

Sewage disposal, public sewer 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Renter-occupied housing units 

Occupied housing units 

HOUSE HEATING FUEL 

Utility gas 

Bottled, tank, or LP gas 

Electricity 

Fuel oil, kerosene, etc. 

All other fuels 

No fuel used 

VEHICLES AVAILABLE 

None 

1 

2 

3 or more 

Vehicles per household 

YEAR HOUSEHOLDER MOVED INTO UNIT 

Owner-occupied housing units 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1969 or earlier 

Renter-occupied housing units 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1969 or earlier 

SELECTED CHARACTERISTICS 

No telephone in unit 

Householder 65 years and over 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

No telephone in unit 

No vehicle available 

Complete plumbing facilities 

1 .00 or less persons per room 

1 .01 or more persons per room 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

1 .00 or less persons per room 

1 .01 or more persons per room 

Mean household income in 1989: 

Owner-occupied housing units (dollars) 

Renter-occupied housing units (dollars) 

Household income in 1989 below poverty level 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Renter-occupied housing units 



2 262 



2 082 



309 



1 529 



1 412 



268 



2 077 



1 901 



397 



1 341 



1 184 



1 201 



1 097 



169 



150 



1 359 



1 275 



189 



1 087 



1 003 



135 



1 352 



69 


61 


46 


19 


33 


96 


46 


20 


231 


168 


234 


43 


111 


145 


83 


142 


223 


214 


315 


151 


133 


116 


179 


183 


686 


326 


490 


269 


358 


340 


260 


286 


520 


271 


343 


248 


215 


181 


199 


240 


227 


205 


339 


252 


154 


248 


126 


172 


116 


135 


224 


113 


53 


79 


99 


133 


190 


149 


86 


246 


127 


154 


95 


176 


13 


7 




2 


2 






3 


83 


62 


132 


54 


18 


- 


27 


63 


641 


533 


666 


404 


268 


439 


347 


474 


1 240 


799 


988 


663 


822 


729 


613 


705 


231 


82 


255 


170 


57 


174 


100 


81 


54 


46 


36 


48 


17 


17 


- 


26 



- 


6 


- 


95 


- 


- 


- 


14 








5 


- 






7 


2 189 


1 448 


2 061 


1 341 


1 160 


1 335 


1 029 


1 337 


1 278 


405 


1 721 


1 188 


103 


334 


11 


933 


742 


109 


1 631 


1 152 


47 


302 


44 


844 


81 


101 


47 


4 


36 


55 


114 


32 


30 


30 


17 


- 


15 


18 


26 


7 


51 


62 


30 


4 


19 


37 


79 


18 



1 219 



177 


105 


484 


261 


85 


7 


50 


24 


166 


258 


302 


114 


117 


236 


183 


262 


1 242 


694 


799 


634 


579 


673 


445 


590 


296 


233 


226 


99 


187 


221 


154 


275 


194 


122 


76 


93 


129 


134 


160 


68 


7 




14 






4 


11 




289 


231 


557 


150 


96 


193 


139 


232 


638 


491 


658 


490 


312 


413 


284 


409 


767 


492 


426 


422 


416 


471 


435 


452 


388 


198 


260 


139 


273 


198 


145 


126 


1.7 


1.5 


1.2 


1.5 


1.9 


1.6 


1.6 


1.4 


1 603 


1 059 


1 218 


856 


932 


1 010 


771 


872 


177 


73 


91 


91 


68 


108 


75 


45 


324 


248 


294 


87 


179 


225 


175 


159 


206 


139 


255 


112 


153 


112 


193 


151 


516 


273 


238 


213 


249 


271 


137 


218 


380 


326 


340 


353 


283 


294 


191 


299 


479 


353 


683 


345 


165 


265 


232 


347 


167 


105 


185 


91 


43 


71 


58 


102 


127 


139 


275 


167 


55 


82 


71 


118 


45 


41 


120 


29 


26 


62 


58 


69 


98 


38 


68 


43 


22 


33 


32 


33 


42 


30 


35 


15 


19 


17 


13 


25 



148 



411 


352 


551 


336 


229 


340 


243 


348 


306 


289 


341 


294 


197 


276 


159 


294 


16 


31 


33 


- 


2 


_ 


24 


12 


29 


44 


70 


23 


10 


33 


23 


16 


129 


108 


216 


50 


63 


121 


50 


81 


2 001 


1 320 


1 854 


1 197 


1 063 


1 220 


898 


1 194 


1 881 


1 201 


1 700 


1 117 


1 050 


1 143 


834 


1 107 


120 


119 


154 


80 


13 


77 


64 


87 


81 


92 


47 


4 


34 


55 


105 


25 


47 


76 


41 


4 


34 


44 


67 


21 


34 


16 


6 


- 


- 


11 


38 


4 


33 863 


24 341 


22 541 


39 984 


24 588 


23 385 


29 981 


25 145 


18 350 


14 779 


11 270 


14 190 


14 757 


16 170 


13 688 


16 741 


457 


355 


808 


374 


223 


363 


239 


369 


257 


189 


415 


161 


161 


220 


118 


213 


200 


166 


393 


213 


62 


143 


121 


156 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 91 



Table 33. Financial Characteristics of Housing Units: 1990 

[Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms ond meanings of symbols, see text 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Specified owner-occupied housing units 

SELECTED MONTHLY OWNER COSTS 

With a mortgage 

Less than $300 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 to $599 

$600 to $799 

$800 to $999 

$1,000 to $1,499 

$1,500 to $1,999 

$2,000 or more 

Median (dollars) 

Not mortgaged 

Less than $100 

$100 to $199 

$200 to $299 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 or more 

Median (dollars) 

HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 BY SELECTED 
MONTHLY OWNER COSTS AS A PERCENTAGE OF 
HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 

Less than $20,000 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$20,000 to $34,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$35,000 to $49,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$50,000 or more 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

Specified renter-occupied housing units 

GROSS RENT 

Less than $100 

$100 to $199 

$200 to $299 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 to $599 

$600 to $749 

$750 to $999 

$1,000 or more 

No cash rent 

Median (dollars) 

HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 BY GROSS RENT AS 
A PERCENTAGE OF HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 

Less than $10,000 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$10,000 to $19,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$20,000 to $34,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$35,000 or more 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

92 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



Florence, SC 
MSA 



19 670 



12 273 



Florence County 



Total Florence city 



19 670 



12 273 



1 435 


1 435 


1 767 


1 767 


1 865 


1 865 


2 026 


2 026 


2 688 


2 688 


1 369 


1 369 


771 


771 


194 


194 


158 


158 


551 


551 


7 397 


7 397 


591 


591 


3 788 


3 788 


2 257 


2 257 


493 


493 


199 


199 


69 


69 


184 


184 


6 073 


6 073 


1 722 


1 722 


698 


698 


568 


568 


576 


576 


2 256 


2 256 


253 


253 


29.3 


29.3 


4 498 


4 498 


2 619 


2 619 


729 


729 


615 


615 


280 


280 


255 


255 


17.4 


17.4 


4 318 


4 318 


3 281 


3 281 


662 


662 


266 


266 


61 


61 


48 


48 


14.6 


14.6 


4 781 


4 781 


4 194 


4 194 


376 


376 


103 


103 


63 


63 


37 


37 


8 


8 


11.7 


11.7 


11 391 


11 391 


283 


283 


1 537 


1 537 


2 083 


2 083 


2 707 


2 707 


2 373 


2 373 


795 


795 


386 


386 


165 


165 


15 


15 


1 047 


1 047 


342 


342 


4 052 


4 052 


145 


145 


202 


202 


262 


262 


210 


210 


2 473 


2 473 


760 


760 


50.0+ 


50.0+ 


2 976 


2 976 


455 


455 


556 


556 


516 


516 


452 


452 


759 


759 


238 


238 


28.5 


28.5 


2 787 


2 787 


1 553 


1 553 


721 


721 


244 


244 


77 


77 


19 


19 


173 


173 


18.6 


18.6 


1 576 


1 576 


1 351 


1 351 


76 


76 


33 


33 


116 


116 


12.4 


12.4 



5 976 

3 584 

216 
475 
549 
534 
874 
398 
341 
129 

68 

603 

2 392 

80 

1 107 

840 

190 

128 

47 
201 



1 668 
470 
202 
158 
169 
614 
55 
29.3 

1 465 
820 
265 
189 
103 



17.8 

1 225 

943 

158 

90 

16 

18 

15.1 

1 618 

1 414 

118 

39 

32 

15 

11.5 
4 663 

91 
707 
736 

1 041 



Totals for split tracts/BNA's in Florence County 



Tract 2.01 



Tract 2.02 



Tract 3 



Tract 5 



Tract 6 



1 644 
43 
90 
124 
123 
1 071 
193 
50.0+ 



178 

199 

144 

249 

147 

399 

40 

29.5 

101 

588 

343 

106 

22 

13 

29 

19.3 

740 

667 

42 

14 



17 
12.6 



461 

310 

8 

7 

6 

51 

45 

47 

71 

23 

52 

963 

151 

30 

101 

10 

10 

239 



67 
19 
16 

6 
26 

24.5 

50 

5 

10 
22 

13 

27.3 

61 
40 
14 



10.2 
283 
192 
46 
18 
17 
10 

14.0 
154 



34 
53 
31 
29 



7 
463 



7 

4 

50.0+ 

21 



7 
6 

31.8 

50 

20 

6 

16 



24.2 
72 
62 

7 



3 

14.4 



723 

516 

44 
68 
63 
94 
124 
83 
31 
9 

583 
207 

8 

109 

71 

15 

4 

191 



106 

40 

7 

11 

5 

36 

7 

26.1 

146 

86 

20 

6 

23 
11 

18.1 

197 

156 

11 

23 

7 



11.9 

274 

249 

25 



11.0 
576 



40 

168 

312 

18 

25 



13 
416 



114 



109 

5 

50.0+ 

160 

21 
32 
62 
42 

3 
32.1 
131 
60 
31 
34 

6 



20.9 
171 
166 



5 
12.6 



915 

714 

60 
117 
102 
143 
180 
92 
18 
2 

545 
201 

14 

102 

69 

11 

5 

191 



245 
43 
28 
32 
28 
91 
23 
31.4 
234 
107 
36 
46 
20 
25 

21.4 

232 

160 

61 



17.0 

204 

184 

17 

3 



12.5 
200 



7 
25 
46 
42 
57 
15 



443 



50.0+ 
65 

20 

14 
23 

8 

33.0 

84 

62 

16 

6 



18.2 
33 
33 



457 

351 

70 
47 
65 
97 
51 
21 



106 



71 
35 



180 



149 
57 
26 



66 

23.4 
160 
54 
72 
15 
13 
6 

21.8 
93 

93 



10.5 
55 



10.0- 
375 

6 

23 

31 

141 

105 

24 

15 

9 

21 
381 



136 
6 



111 

19 

50.0+ 

116 

6 

36 

23 
49 
2 
33.3 
82 
41 
21 



12 

18.2 

41 

32 



856 

600 

63 
32 
99 
147 

184 
59 
16 



565 
256 

20 

126 

105 

5 



185 



211 
41 
32 

20 

112 

6 

41.0 

195 

83 

56 

46 

5 

5 

21.3 

252 

204 

36 

12 



15.2 
198 
170 
28 



12.3 
180 



15 
40 
59 
27 
23 



16 
442 



22 



7 

7 

29.7 

43 

11 
24 



27.2 

81 

28 

38 

6 



9 

21.1 

34 

34 



Tract 7 



448 

146 

29 
39 

51 
9 
15 



408 
302 

42 
145 
93 

11 

6 

5 

174 



254 

107 

28 

25 

5 

83 

6 

23.0 

100 

84 

6 

10 



13.3 

34 

31 

3 



10.0- 
60 
57 



10.0- 
760 

6 

284 

193 

168 

42 

20 

16 

5 

26 

259 



439 

6 

7 

21 

78 

306 

21 

49.0 

169 

40 

32 

22 

20 

43 

12 

26.5 

118 

93 

18 

7 



13.9 

34 

28 

6 



Tract 8 



909 

493 

82 
141 
121 

60 

61 
12 
10 
6 

420 
416 

34 
238 
106 

25 

13 

170 



454 

105 

63 

49 

54 

172 

11 

30.4 

212 

112 

55 

21 

19 

5 

19.2 
135 
123 

7 



12.0 
108 
102 



10.0- 
715 

5 
109 
190 
221 
102 
20 
5 



63 

314 



361 

25 
20 

245 

71 

50.0+ 

193 

14 

19 

76 

13 

62 

9 

28.9 

120 

88 

22 



10 
16.3 

41 
41 



12.8 10.0- 17.1 10.0- 10.5 

CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 33. Financial Characteristics of Housing Units: 1990— Con. 

[Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text) 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Totals for split tracts/BNA's in Florence County — Con, 



Tract 9 



Tract 10 



Tract 1 1 



Tract 12 



Tract 13 



Tract 14 



Tract 15.01 



Tract 16.01 



Florence city, Florence County 



Tract 2.01 

(pt.) Tract 2.02 (pt.) 



Specified owner-occupied housing units 

SELECTED MONTHLY OWNER COSTS 

With o mortgage 

Less than $300 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 to $599 

$600 to $799 

$800 to $999 

$1,000 to $1,499 

$1,500 to $1,999 

$2,000 or more 

Median (dollars) 

Not mortgaged 

Less than $100 

$100 to $199 

$200 to $299 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 or more 

Median (dollars) 

HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 BY SELECTED 
MONTHLY OWNER COSTS AS A PERCENTAGE OF 
HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 

Less than $20,000 

Less thon 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent - 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$20,000 to $34,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$35,000 to $49,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$50,000 or more 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent — 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

Specified renter-occupied housing units 

GROSS RENT 

Less than $100 

$100 to $199 

$200 to $299 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 to $599 

$600 to $749 

$750 to $999 

$1,000 or more 

No cash rent 

Median (dollars) 

HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 BY GROSS RENT AS 
A PERCENTAGE OF HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 

Less than $10,000 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$10,000 to $19,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$20,000 to $34,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$35,000 or more 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 



582 

227 

24 

56 
51 
41 
42 
13 



471 
355 

46 
188 

88 

18 
4 

11 
171 



330 
120 
38 
39 
29 
104 

25.9 

139 

77 

38 

10 



18.2 
78 
78 



11.4 
35 
35 



10.0- 
694 

39 
166 
172 
171 
95 
14 
6 



31 
264 



363 
26 
20 
36 
19 

210 

52 

50.0+ 

209 
52 
36 
29 
39 
43 
10 

27.0 

107 
83 
24 



16.3 

15 
15 



10.0- 



268 

150 

17 
22 
46 
51 
14 



480 
118 

4 
69 
45 



179 



87 

41 
5 

15 
5 

21 

22.5 

117 

69 

29 

16 

3 



17.4 

45 

42 

3 



15.9 
19 
19 



10.0- 
579 



17 

140 

154 

113 

34 

23 

85 

4 

9 

385 



149 
17 

132 

50.0+ 
181 
38 
39 
45 
6 
53 

26.5 

157 

91 

42 

7 

4 

13 

19.3 
92 
69 

14 



9 
10.6 



1 026 

528 

41 
107 
104 

60 
159 

32 

25 



543 
498 

6 

245 

176 

41 

5 

25 
199 



353 

125 

28 

23 

35 

137 

5 

29.6 

291 

145 

36 

21 

53 

36 

20.1 

223 

168 

45 

10 



12.2 

159 

154 

5 



10.0- 
1 126 

20 
125 
130 
245 
448 
121 

17 



20 

406 



260 



55 

33 

147 

6 

43.3 

278 

38 

28 

36 

54 

113 

9 

33.0 

383 

202 

121 

49 



11 
19.4 
205 
205 



11.9 



1 007 

602 

12 
42 
48 
86 
138 
97 
58 
75 
46 
770 
405 

103 
146 
73 
71 
12 
269 



142 
20 
27 

11 

72 

12 

40.0 

182 

102 

26 

39 

15 



257 

200 

13 

32 

5 

7 

14.8 

426 

382 

22 

7 



10.0- 
425 



11 

67 
184 
78 
56 

12 

17 
462 



78 



48 

30 

50.0+ 

80 



16 

9 

55 

39.4 
153 

42 

72 

31 

8 



22.4 
114 
96 

10 



8 
12.9 



856 

581 

69 
78 
35 

74 
170 
86 
53 

16 
634 
275 

6 
125 
113 

10 
21 

204 



175 

33 

38 

19 

23 

55 

7 

28.4 

193 

151 

5 

37 



13.6 

240 

162 

59 

12 

5 

2 

17.2 

248 

227 

13 



12.3 
469 



21 
45 
141 
122 
108 
16 
11 

5 
421 



66 



5 

50 

11 

50.0+ 

132 

7 

19 

23 

12 

71 

36.7 

168 
82 
61 

7 
18 



20.2 

103 

82 

16 



5 
12.1 



1 311 

966 

35 

57 

101 

93 

229 

182 

200 

54 

15 

770 

345 

108 

203 

22 

12 

226 



145 

31 

6 

17 

21 

49 

21 

31.9 

234 

154 

29 

12 

13 

26 

14.1 

261 

191 

28 

30 

6 

6 

15.2 

671 

534 

72 

41 

24 



14.7 
303 

29 
15 
23 
12 
127 
62 
12 
10 

13 
473 



71 
7 
7 

22 

30 

5 

29.3 

26 



11 
9 

33.2 

73 

29 

30 

6 



20.6 
133 
123 

10 



15.1 



842 

556 

59 

34 

56 

46 

169 

124 

50 

5 

13 

716 

286 

6 

170 

85 

25 



182 



179 
72 

10 

17 
80 

32.2 

147 
84 

40 
8 
15 

14.5 

249 

161 

52 

31 

5 



16.6 

267 

221 

35 

5 
6 

14.1 
263 



32 
49 

102 
33 

7 



31 
313 



89 



11 

4 

45 

29 

44.3 

93 

14 

53 

7 

6 

13 

23.1 

71 

42 

8 

7 
9 

5 

18.8 

10 

6 



4 
12.5 



679 

508 

58 
25 
154 
117 

125 
11 
18 



513 
171 

35 

81 

46 

9 



174 



161 
48 

16 
36 
61 

32.3 
199 
96 
48 
35 
14 
6 

20.4 

162 

109 

43 

10 



17.3 
157 
157 



10.0- 
440 

28 
53 
45 
58 
127 
62 
16 



43 

406 



106 

7 
41 

15 

24 

19 

24.5 

122 

17 

21 

4 

39 

41 

32.4 

129 

38 

57 

18 

6 

10 

21.9 

83 

50 
4 
4 



25 

17.0 



575 



17 
17 

27.5 



48 



27 

21 



489 



413 



20 



21.7 
28 
28 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



15.3 

FLORENCE, SC MSA 



12.5 

93 



A 



Table 33. Financial Characteristics of Housing Units: 1990— Con. 

[Dato based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Specified owner-occupied housing units 

SELECTED MONTHLY OWNER COSTS 

With a mortgage 

Less than $300 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 to $599 

$600 to $799 

$800 to $999 

$1,000 to $1,499 

$1,500 to $1,999 

$2,000 or more 

Median (dollars) 

Not mortgaged 

Less than $100 

$100 to $199 

$200 to $299 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 or more 

Median (dollars) 

HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 BY SELECTED 
MONTHLY OWNER COSTS AS A PERCENTAGE OF 
HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 

Less than $20,000 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median .. 

$20,000 to $34,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$35,000 to $49,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$50,000 or more 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

Specified renter-occupied housing units 

GROSS RENT 

Less than $100 

$100 to $199 

$200 to $299 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 to $599 

$600 to $749 

$750 to $999 

$1,000 or more 

No cash rent 

Median (dollars) 

HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 BY GROSS RENT AS 
A PERCENTAGE OF HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 

Less than $10,000 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$10,000 to $19,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$20,000 to $34,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$35,000 or more 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 



94 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



Florence city, Florence County— Con. 



Troct 3 (pt.) Troct 5 (pt.) Tract 6 (pt.) Tract 7 (pt.) Tract 8 (pt.) Tract 9 (pt.) Tract 10 (pt.) Tract 11 (pt.) Tract 12 (pt.) Tract 13 (pt.) 



110 

84 

5 
14 
13 
37 
15 



524 
26 



26 



175 



27 
8 
5 



35.3 

54 

32 

6 

16 



18.2 
22 
22 



14.2 
7 
7 



10.0- 
7 



296 



265 



856 



475 



268 



1 026 



525 



7 
45.0 



17.5 



10.0- 



10.5 



14 



9 
10.6 



961 



584 



274 


73 


457 


215 


150 


528 


581 


395 


- 


16 


82 


24 


17 


41 


12 


12 


10 


14 


128 


44 


22 


107 


42 


44 


52 


27 


116 


51 


46 


104 


48 


6 


70 


5 


55 


41 


51 


60 


78 


46 


107 


11 


54 


42 


14 


159 


132 


146 


28 


- 


12 


13 


- 


32 


90 


74 


7 


- 


10 


- 


- 


25 


58 


51 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


75 




— 


- 


- 


- 


— 


- 


46 


16 


605 


415 


417 


481 


480 


543 


774 


717 


22 


192 


399 


260 


118 


498 


380 


189 


- 


12 


27 


31 


4 


6 






22 


104 


238 


147 


69 


245 


95 


67 


- 


56 


96 


63 


45 


176 


129 


95 


- 


9 


25 


14 


- 


41 


73 


6 


- 


6 


13 


- 


- 


5 


71 


21 


— 


5 


- 


5 


- 


25 


12 




168 


183 


169 


168 


179 


199 


275 


220 


42 


145 


421 


272 


87 


353 


142 


65 


- 


48 


98 


87 


41 


125 


20 


12 


- 


17 


63 


34 


5 


28 


27 


17 


- 


20 


44 


39 


15 


23 






13 


5 


54 


29 


5 


35 


11 


11 


29 


49 


151 


83 


21 


137 


72 


25 


- 


6 


11 


- 


- 


5 


12 




40.6 


26.1 


30.0 


26.9 


22.5 


29.6 


40.0 


31.6 


67 


90 


212 


116 


117 


291 


162 


126 


9 


74 


112 


60 


69 


145 


95 


106 


25 


6 


55 


38 


29 


36 


26 




23 


- 


21 


10 


16 


21 


33 


20 


5 


10 


19 


- 


3 


53 






5 


- 


5 


8 


- 


36 


8 


- 


24.9 


13.1 


19.2 


19.3 


17.4 


20.1 


18.2 


13.3 


118 


3 


128 


57 


45 


223 


239 


173 


82 


- 


116 


57 


42 


168 


182 


113 


24 


3 


7 


- 


3 


45 


13 


49 


12 


- 


- 


- 


- 


. 10 


32 


6 


— 


— 


- 


— 


— 


— 


5 


5 


- 


- 


5 


- 


- 


- 


7 




— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


_ 


_ 




17.7 


22.5 


11.5 


11.5 


15.9 


12.2 


15.5 


17.7 


69 


27 


95 


30 


19 


159 


418 


220 


63 


27 


95 


30 


19 


154 


374 


199 


6 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 


22 


13 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8 


_ 


— 


— 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7 


8 


12.2 


10.0- 


10.0- 


10.0 


10.0- 


10.0- 


10.0- 


13.8 


71 


622 


715 


565 


579 


1 126 


390 


224 


_ 


6 


5 


32 


_ 


20 






- 


270 


109 


139 


17 


125 


11 


11 


- 


128 


190 


113 


140 


130 






24 


122 


221 


162 


154 


245 


56 


40 


16 


33 


102 


68 


113 


448 


167 


64 


14 


20 


20 


14 


34 


121 


78 


93 


17 


12 


5 


6 


23 


17 


49 


5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


85 


- 


12 


11 


— 


5 


— 


— 


4 


— 


_ 




- 


26 


63 


31 


9 


20 


17 




493 


234 


314 


272 


385 


406 


462 


449 


_ 


396 


361 


290 


149 


260 


78 


24 


- 


6 


- 


19 


- 


11 


_ 




- 


7 


25 


20 


17 


8 


_ 




- 


18 


20 


31 


_ 


55 


_ 




- 


64 


- 


11 


- 


33 


_ 




- 


280 


245 


157 


132 


147 


48 


24 


- 


21 


71 


52 


- 


6 


30 




- 


49.4 


50.0+ 


50.0+ 


50.0+ 


43.3 


50.0+ 


50.0+ 


22 


143 


193 


177 


181 


278 


59 


66 


- 


40 


14 


52 


38 


38 


_ 




- 


28 


19 


24 


39 


28 


_ 




14 


13 


76 


29 


45 


36 


16 


16 


- 


20 


13 


29 


6 


54 


9 




8 


30 


62 


33 


53 


113 


34 


50 


- 


12 


9 


10 


_ 


9 


_ 




28.9 


24.6 


28.9 


26.3 


26.5 


33.0 


38.2 


43.4 


26 


49 


120 


83 


157 


383 


153 


47 


10 


36 


88 


68 


91 


202 


42 


13 


16 


6 


22 


15 


42 


121 


72 


24 


- 


7 


- 


- 


7 


49 


31 




- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


- 


8 


10 


— 


- 


- 


- 


13 


_ 


_ 




- 


- 


10 


- 


_ 


11 


_ 




20.9 


15.2 


16.3 


15.9 


19.3 


19.4 


22.4 


22.2 


23 


34 


41 


15 


92 


205 


100 


87 


23 


28 


41 


15 


69 


205 


82 


71 


- 


6 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10 


16 



10.0- 10.6 11.9 13.0 11.3 

CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 






Table 33. Financial Characteristics of Housing Units: 1990 -Con. 

[Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions ot terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Florence city, Florence County— Con. 



Tract 14 (pt.) Tract 15.01 (pt.) Tract 16.01 (pt.) 



Remainder of Florence County 



Tract 1 Tract 2.01 (pt.) Tract 2.02 (pt.) 



Tract 3 (pt.: 



Tract 4 



Specified owner-occupied housing units 

SELECTED MONTHLY OWNER COSTS 

With a mortgage 

Less than $300 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 to $599 - 

$600 to $799 

$800 to $999 

$1,000 to $1,499 

$1,500 to $1,999 

$2,000 or more. 

Median (dollars) 

Not mortgaged 

Less than $100 

$100 to $199 .. 

$200 to $299 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 or more 

Median (dollars) 

HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 BY SELECTED 
MONTHLY OWNER COSTS AS A PERCENTAGE OF 
HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 

Less than $20,000 - 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$20,000 to $34,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent — 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$35,000 to $49,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$50,000 or more.. 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

Specified renter-occupied housing units 

GROSS RENT 

Less than $100 

$100 to $199 

$200 to $299 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 to $599 

$600 to $749 

$750 to $999 

$1,000 or more 

No cash rent 

Median (dollars) 

HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 BY GROSS RENT AS 
A PERCENTAGE OF HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 

Less than $10,000 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$10,000 to $19,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$20,000 to $34,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$35,000 or more 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 



1 097 

789 

7 

50 

65 

74 

194 

149 

190 

54 

6 

808 

308 

94 

180 

22 

12 

229 



114 

31 

6 

17 

6 

33 

21 

27.8 

192 

118 

23 

12 

13 

26 

13.6 
217 

161 

14 

30 

6 

6 

14.5 

574 

446 

72 

32 

24 



14.2 
212 



10 
12 
106 
55 
6 
10 

13 
483 



27 



22 

5 

50.0+ 

26 



11 
9 

33.2 

57 

24 

19 

6 



20.1 
102 
92 

10 



15.6 



475 



22.5 



162 



12.5 
5 
5 



12.5 



1 008 

924 

14 

23 

55 

44 

390 

246 

127 

20 

5 

770 

84 

38 

20 

12 

9 

5 

215 



63 

13 
6 
9 

19 
16 
27.5 
162 
32 
24 
42 
32 
32 

28.0 
299 
91 
114 
43 
30 
21 

22.6 

484 

411 

60 

7 
6 

15.4 
276 



9 

8 

39 

130 
15 
45 
16 
6 
8 
454 



39 



50.0+ 
42 



23 

10 

32.6 

122 

41 

57 

18 



21.8 

73 

51 

16 

6 



14.3 



293 

8 

7 

6 

34 

45 

47 

71 

23 

52 

998 

151 

30 
101 

10 
10 

239 



67 
19 
16 

6 
26 

24.5 
33 

5 
10 

5 

13 

26.5 
61 
40 
14 



10.2 
283 
192 
46 
18 
17 
10 

14.0 
106 



34 
26 
10 
29 



7 
415 



7 

4 

50.0+ 

21 



7 
6 

31.8 
30 
12 



10 



26.5 

44 

34 

7 



3 
13.9 



723 

516 

44 
68 
63 
94 
124 
83 
31 
9 

583 
207 

8 
109 
71 

15 
4 



106 

40 

7 

11 

5 

36 

7 

26.1 

146 

86 

20 

6 

23 
11 

18.1 
197 
156 

11 
23 

7 



11.9 

274 

249 

25 



11.0 
568 



40 

168 

304 

18 

25 



13 
416 



114 



109 

5 

50.0+ 

160 

21 
32 
62 
42 

3 
32.1 
131 
60 
31 
34 

6 



20.9 
163 
158 



5 
12.6 



805 

630 

55 
103 

89 
106 
165 

92 

18 
2 

552 
175 

14 
76 
69 

11 
5 

198 



218 
35 
23 
32 
28 
77 
23 
31.3 

180 
75 
30 
30 
20 
25 

22.5 
210 
138 

61 
8 
3 



17.4 
197 

177 
17 
3 



12.7 
193 



7 
25 
46 
42 

50 
15 



430 



50.0+ 
58 

20 

14 
16 

8 

31.8 

84 

62 

16 

6 



18.2 
33 
33 



494 

393 

38 
76 
52 
122 
68 
37 



527 
101 

12 
75 
14 



151 



75 
29 
5 
6 
10 
25 

27.9 

173 

102 

6 

42 

6 

17 

18.6 
174 
156 

18 



15.3 
72 
72 



13.2 
472 

11 
16 
112 
217 
44 
40 
12 



20 
327 



194 
11 



9 

93 

81 

50.0+ 

148 

7 

24 

34 

40 

40 

3 

30.9 

109 

62 

5 

30 

5 

7 

18.3 

21 

21 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



12.8 16.0 

FLORENCE, SC MSA 95 



Table 33. Financial Characteristics of Housing Units: 1990— Con. 

[ Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text ] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 5 (pt.) 



Tract 6 (pt.) 



Tract 7 (pt.) 



Tract 8 (pt.) 



Tract 9 (pt.) 



Tract 10 (pt.) 



Tract 1 1 (pt.) 



Tract 12 (pt.) 



Specified owner-occupied housing units 

SELECTED MONTHLY OWNER COSTS 

With a mortgage 

Less than $300 — 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 — 

$500 to $599 

$600 to $799 

$800 to $999 - 

$1,000 to $1,499 

$1,500 to $1,999 

$2,000 or more... 

Median (dollars) 

Not mortgaged 

Less than $100 

$100 to $199 

$200 to $299 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 or more 

Median (dollars) 

HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 BY SELECTED 
MONTHLY OWNER COSTS AS A PERCENTAGE OF 
HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 

Less than $20,000 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median -- 

$20,000 to $34,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$35,000 to $49,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$50,000 or more—. 

Less thon 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

Specified renter-occupied housing units 

GROSS RENT 

Less than $100 

$100 to $199 

$200 to $299 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 to $599 

$600 to $749 

$750 to $999 

$1,000 or more 

No cash rent 

Median (dollars) 

HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 BY GROSS RENT AS 
A PERCENTAGE OF HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 

Less than $10,000 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$10,000 to $19,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$20,000 to $34,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$35,000 or more 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 



457 

351 

70 

47 
65 
97 
51 
21 



488 
106 



71 

35 



180 



149 
57 
26 



66 

23.4 
160 

54 
72 
15 
13 
6 

21.8 

93 
93 



10.5 

55 

48 

7 



10.0- 
375 

6 

23 

31 

141 

105 

24 

15 

9 

21 
381 



136 
6 



111 

19 

50.0+ 

116 

6 

36 

23 
49 
2 
33.3 
82 
41 
21 



12 

18.2 

41 

32 



10.0- 



560 

326 

63 
22 

47 
77 
77 
31 
9 



537 
234 

20 

104 

105 

5 



192 



169 
41 
32 

7 
83 
6 
41.5 
128 
74 
31 
23 



14.6 
134 
122 

12 



10.0- 
129 
107 
22 



12.5 
109 



15 
16 
43 
13 
6 



16 
419 



22 



7 

7 

29.7 

21 

11 
10 



24.8 

55 

18 

22 

6 



9 
21.1 

11 
11 



15.4 



183 

73 

13 
25 
24 

4 
4 

3 



395 
110 

30 

41 

37 

2 



139 



109 

59 

11 

5 

34 

17.5 
10 
10 



16.4 
31 
31 



10.0- 
33 
30 



10.0- 
138 



14 

65 

46 

9 



287 



43 



3 

14 
26 

46.4 
26 

4 
9 

13 

35.0 
69 
57 
12 



13.5 



53 
36 

13 
5 
5 

7 



475 
17 

7 

10 



207 



33 

7 

5 

21 

50.0+ 



17.5 
13 
7 



10.0- 



107 
12 

12 



375 
95 

15 

41 

25 

4 

4 

6 

181 



58 

33 

4 



21 

18.3 
23 

17 



15.4 
21 
21 



11.3 

5 
5 



10.0- 
129 

7 
27 
59 

9 
27 



254 



73 

7 

5 

8 

53 

50.0+ 
32 



10 
10 

32.0 
24 

15 
9 



18.1 



46 
21 



671 
25 



222 



20 

7 

6 

7 

27.5 
18 
18 



10.0- 
8 
8 



12.5 
35 



423 



21 
40.5 



12.5 



96 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 33. Financial Characteristics of Housing Units: 1990— Con. 

[Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remoinder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 13 (pt.) 


Tract 14 (pt.) 


Tract 15.01 (pt.) 


272 


214 


842 


186 


177 


556 


57 


28 


59 


34 


7 


34 


29 


36 


56 


28 


19 


46 


24 


35 


169 


12 


33 


124 


2 


10 


50 


- 


- 


5 


- 


9 


13 


409 


592 


716 


86 


37 


286 


6 


- 


6 


58 


14 


170 


18 


23 


85 


4 


- 


25 



Tract 15.02 Tract 16.01 (pt.) 



(pt.) 


Tract 16.02 


658 


556 


487 


324 


58 


37 


25 


56 


133 


84 


117 


60 


125 


77 


11 


4 


18 


6 


521 


484 


171 


232 


35 


42 


81 


135 


46 


47 


9 


8 



Tract 17 



Tract 18 



Specified owner-occupied housing units 

SELECTED MONTHLY OWNER COSTS 

With a mortgage 

Less than $300 -- 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 to $599 

$600 to $799 

$800 to $999 

$1,000 to $1,499 

$1,500 to $1,999 

$2,000 or more- — 

Median (dollars) 

Not mortgaged 

Less than $100 

$100 to $199 

$200 to $299 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 or more 

Median (dollars) 

HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 BY SELECTED 
MONTHLY OWNER COSTS AS A PERCENTAGE OF 
HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 

Less than $20,000— 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$20,000 to $34,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$35,000 to $49,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$50,000 or more 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

Specified renter-occupied housing units 

GROSS RENT 

Less than $100 

$100 to $199 

$200 to $299 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 to $599 

$600 to $749 - 

$750 to $999 

$1,000 or more 

No cash rent 

Median (dollars) 

HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 BY GROSS RENT AS 
A PERCENTAGE OF HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 

Less than $10,000 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$10,000 to $19,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$20,000 to $34,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$35,000 or more 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 



164 



110 
21 
21 
19 
12 
30 

7 

27.5 

67 

45 

5 
17 



14.0 

67 

49 

10 

6 



15.7 
28 
28 



10.0- 
245 



10 
45 
101 
58 
15 
11 



5 
378 



42 



5 

26 

11 

50.0+ 

66 

7 

19 

7 

12 
21 

30.0 
121 
69 
37 

7 



19.1 
16 
11 



16.1 



210 



15 
16 

35.4 

42 

36 

6 



16.) 

44 
30 
14 



17.5 
97 



16.1 
91 

29 
15 
13 

21 
7 
6 



228 



44 
7 
7 

22 



26.8 



21.4 
31 
31 



11.8 



182 



179 

72 
10 

17 
80 

32.2 
147 



40 
8 
15 

14.5 

249 

161 

52 

31 

5 



16.6 

267 

221 

35 

5 
6 

14.1 
263 



32 
49 
102 
33 
7 



31 
313 



89 



11 

4 

45 

29 

44.3 

93 

14 

53 

7 

6 

13 

23.1 

71 

42 

8 

7 

9 



4 
12.5 



616 

423 

20 
43 
59 
102 
111 
68 
20 



590 
193 

22 

102 
42 
12 
15 

179 



148 

27 

17 

14 

11 

75 

4 

36.5 

138 

62 

38 

7 

24 
7 

20.9 
179 

137 
42 



15.3 

151 

143 

8 



11.9 
201 



11 
52 
59 
35 



31 
323 



61 
6 



39 
16 
50.0+ 
55 
27 

7 
16 

5 



20.4 
36 
30 



6 

16.3 

49 

33 

7 



9 
12.2 



174 



161 
48 

16 
36 
61 

32.3 
178 
96 
27 
35 
14 
6 

19.4 

162 

109 

43 

10 



17.3 
157 
157 



10.0- 
344 



28 
20 
53 
122 
62 
16 



35 

424 



47 

28 



11 

23.2 

96 

21 

34 
41 

34.0 

123 

32 

57 

18 

6 

10 

22.1 

78 

45 

4 

4 



25 

17.4 



158 



194 

53 

17 

30 

19 

66 

9 

28.8 

170 

128 

17 

13 

12 



11.4 
91 
75 
16 



15.7 

101 

95 

6 



10.0- 
188 



21 
38 
61 
13 

24 



31 
322 



40 



23 

17 

50.0+ 

48 

5 

17 

9 

5 

8 

4 

25.0 

74 

59 

12 



3 

15.8 

26 

19 



7 
10.0- 



198 

109 

22 

31 
19 
12 

16 
9 



407 
89 
33 
42 

5 



122 



76 
16 
9 

11 
34 
6 
34.5 
36 
30 



10.0- 
54 
45 



13.3 
32 
32 



12.5 
129 



24 
12 
31 

15 



37 
375 



46 



24 

15 

50.0+ 

52 

5 
10 

15 
22 
32.5 
31 
23 



17.1 



571 

286 

43 
68 
70 
55 
35 
9 
6 



448 
285 

48 

159 

61 

15 

2 

156 



252 
69 
26 
23 

19 

85 

30 

28.5 

123 

81 

28 

13 

1 



16.7 

109 

94 

15 



10.0- 

87 

81 

6 



10.0- 
233 

7 
25 
64 
34 
12 

2 



256 



122 

5 

5 
2 

46 
64 
50.0+ 
49 
15 
15 

5 

3 

11 

21.3 

34 

21 



13 

12.2 

28 

25 



3 

10.0- 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 97 



Table 33. Financial Characteristics of Housing Units: 1990— Con. 

[Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 19 



Tract 20 



Tract 22.01 



Tract 22.02 



Tract 23 



Tract 24.' 



Tract 25 



Tract 26 



Specified owner-occupied housing units 

SELECTED MONTHLY OWNER COSTS 

With a mortgage 

Less than $300 

$300 to $399 — 

$400 to $499 

$500 to $599 — 

$600 to $799 — 

$800 to $999 — 

$1,000 to $1,499 - 

$1,500 to $1,999 

$2,000 or more. 

Median (dollars) 

Not mortgaged 

Less than $100 

$100 to $199 

$200 to $299 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 or more 

Median (dollars) 

HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 BY SELECTED 
MONTHLY OWNER COSTS AS A PERCENTAGE OF 
HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 

Less than $20,000 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median -- 

$20,000 to $34,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$35,000 to $49,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$50,000 or more 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

Specified renter-occupied housing units 

GROSS RENT 

Less than $100 

$100 to $199 

$200 to $299 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 to $599 

$600 to $749 

$750 to $999 

$1,000 or more 

No cosh rent 

Median (dollars) 

HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 BY GROSS RENT AS 
A PERCENTAGE OF HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 

Less than $10,000 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$10,000 to $19,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$20,000 to $34,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$35,000 or more 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 



867 

479 

74 
122 
113 
79 
58 
27 
6 



436 
388 

56 

223 

86 

15 

5 

3 

174 



319 

109 

39 

22 

14 

129 

6 

26.9 

192 

140 

19 

24 

3 

6 

15.2 
192 
170 

14 
8 



10.0- 

164 

149 

5 



8 

10.0- 

423 

20 

63 

126 

78 

31 

7 

5 



93 

272 



155 

25 
2 

10 
8 
63 
47 
41.4 
117 
24 
44 
23 

7 

19 

22.8 

86 

63 

5 



18 

14.6 

65 

54 



11 
10.0- 



468 

204 
75 
46 

15 
27 
38 



355 
264 

28 

139 

89 

8 



178 



201 

95 

21 

11 

31 

39 

4 

20.8 

136 

100 

2 

19 

11 

4 

10.6 
84 

78 
6 



10.0 
47 
47 



10.0- 
280 

17 
58 
69 
69 
8 



59 

244 



105 

4 

4 

2 

5 

65 

25 

50.0+ 

98 

19 

11 

22 

10 

5 

31 

25.8 

66 

61 



5 

11.1 
11 
9 



2 

10.0- 



963 

506 

119 
180 
60 
93 
5 
27 
22 



377 

457 

52 

291 

89 

25 



160 



528 
141 
32 
77 
58 
195 
25 
30.1 
204 
129 
35 
40 



16.7 

126 

105 

5 

16 



10.0- 

105 

77 

18 

10 



10.0- 
665 

43 
193 
208 
92 
50 

15 



64 
232 



382 
13 
41 
19 
34 

235 

40 

43.0 

173 
71 
30 
32 
29 

11 
21.7 

96 
58 
25 



13 
16.7 

14 
14 



10.0- 



743 

405 

86 
64 
66 
66 
63 
35 
14 

11 

482 

338 

6 

154 

95 

75 

8 
210 



334 
62 
39 
43 
33 

138 
19 
32.0 
85 
61 
8 
10 



16.7 

149 

118 

21 

10 



12.8 
175 
160 

15 



10.0- 
335 



100 

108 

60 

15 

14 

6 



32 

259 



198 

7 

20 

4 

136 

31 

50.0+ 

56 

13 

14 

10 

4 

6 

9 

23.8 

50 

28 

15 



2 

14.3 

31 

25 



6 
10.0- 



459 

267 

75 
44 
55 
46 
22 
25 



427 
192 

27 
127 

29 
9 



143 



196 

52 

34 

30 

6 

65 

9 

26.3 

132 

92 

35 

5 



15.4 
82 
57 
13 
12 



13.4 
49 
49 



10.0- 
155 

9 
19 
40 
26 

7 



54 

256 



49 



24 

19 

43.6 

63 

19 
11 

1 

1 

31 

17.9 

40 
36 



4 

16.1 

3 

3 



10.0- 



495 

218 

85 

44 
35 
30 
19 
2 
3 



339 

277 

22 

148 
73 
33 

1 

183 



262 

42 

57 

27 

33 

95 

8 

30.2 

119 

103 

9 

3 



13.2 
57 
57 



10.0- 
57 
57 



10.0- 
233 

8 
41 
47 
51 

2 



81 

232 



119 

4 

17 

59 

39 

50.0+ 

45 

7 

26 

3 

9 

27.1 

38 
18 
3 



17 

13.8 

31 

15 



16 
10.0- 



312 

186 

23 
33 
32 
84 

14 



507 
126 

10 
91 
25 



160 



75 
40 

6 
10 

9 

10 
14.9 
93 
66 
21 
6 



13.9 

118 

104 

14 



26 
26 



10.0- 
197 

22 
30 
41 
26 



78 

209 



99 
7 



40 
52 
50.0+ 
48 
11 
8 



17 
12 
24.4 
41 
18 
9 



14 

10.0- 

9 

9 



10.0- 



580 

301 

53 
65 
48 
37 
82 
14 
2 



471 
279 

12 

154 

100 

6 

7 

187 



292 

72 

38 

20 

27 

126 

9 

32.1 

136 

84 

21 

19 

10 

2 

15.6 

85 

76 

9 



14.5 

67 

64 

3 



10.0- 
345 

13 
64 
60 
96 
47 
10 
6 
2 

47 
309 



160 

6 

4 

14 

3 

106 

27 

48.9 

94 

11 

12 

19 

16 

13 

23 

28.3 

57 

34 

15 

2 



6 

18.2 

34 

31 



3 
10.2 



98 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 34. Selected Structural Characteristics of Housing Units With a White Householder: 1990 

[Threshold and complementary threshold are 400 persons. Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Florence, SC MSA 



Florence County 



Total 



Florence city 



Totals for split trocts/BNA's in Florence County 



Tract 2.01 



Tract 3 



Tract 5 



Tract 7 



Tract 10 



Occupied housing units 

YEAR STRUCTURE BUILT 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1960 to 1969 

1950 to 1959 

1940 to 1949 

1939 or earlier 

BEDROOMS 

No bedroom 

1 bedroom 

2 bedrooms 

3 bedrooms 

4 bedrooms 

5 or more bedrooms 

SELECTED STRUCTURAL CHARACTERISTICS 

Complete kitchen facilities 

Source of water, public system or private company 

Sewage disposal, public sewer 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Renter-occupied housing units 

HOUSE HEATING FUEL 

Utility gas 

Bottled, tank, or LP gas 

Electricity 

Fuel oil, kerosene, etc. 

All other fuels 

No fuel used 

VEHICLES AVAILABLE 

None 

1 

2 

3 or more 

Vehicles per household 

YEAR HOUSEHOLDER MOVED INTO UNIT 

Owner-occupied housing units 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 -. 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1969 or earlier 

Renter-occupied housing units 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1969 or earlier 

SELECTED CHARACTERISTICS 

No telephone in unit 

Householder 65 years and over 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

No telephone in unit 

No vehicle available 

Complete plumbing facilities 

1.00 or less persons per room 

1.01 or more persons per room 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

1 .00 or less persons per room 

1 .01 or more persons per room 

Mean household income in 1989: 

Owner-occupied housing units (dollars) 

Renter-occupied housing units (dollars) 

Household income in 1989 below poverty level 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Renter-occupied housing units 



26 566 



26 566 



727 


3 302 


3 132 


7 077 


5 056 


3 362 


2 030 


1 880 


141 


1 002 


7 504 


14 252 


3 117 


550 


26 475 


16 336 


12 065 


165 


93 


72 


2 052 


2 096 


17 880 


3 511 


963 


64 


1 612 


7 908 


11 749 


5 297 


1.9 


20 335 


1 989 


4 694 


3 063 


5 032 


5 557 


6 231 


2 932 


2 004 


614 


404 


277 



1 343 



5 870 


4 880 


41 


109 


990 


26 401 


25 969 


432 


165 


165 


39 751 


25 067 


3 096 


1 762 


1 334 



727 


3 302 


3 132 


7 077 


5 056 


3 362 


2 030 


1 880 


141 


1 002 


7 504 


14 252 


3 117 


550 


26 475 


16 336 


12 065 


165 


93 


72 


2 052 


2 096 


17 880 


3 511 


963 


64 


1 612 


7 908 


11 749 


5 297 


1.9 


20 335 


1 989 


4 694 


3 063 


5 032 


5 557 


6 231 


2 932 


2 004 


614 


404 


277 



1 343 



5 870 


4 880 


41 


109 


990 


26 401 


25 969 


432 


165 


165 


39 751 


25 067 


3 096 


1 762 


1 334 



6 543 



168 

572 

518 

1 300 

1 230 

1 179 

993 

583 



49 

570 

1 761 

3 004 

984 

175 



6 530 
6 461 
6 405 

16 
6 

10 



1 263 
121 

4 233 

877 

41 



469 
347 
601 
126 
1.7 



4 291 

395 
981 
553 
914 

1 448 

2 252 
1 086 

830 
203 
111 
22 



180 



1 


758 


1 


372 




6 




6 




295 


6 


527 


6 


501 




26 




16 




16 


51 


066 


30 


437 




616 




254 




362 



599 



24 
81 
175 
226 
66 
24 

3 



23 

120 
239 
168 
49 



599 
536 
183 



17 

13 

528 

35 

6 



12 

67 

365 

155 

2.2 



479 

66 
134 
100 
132 

47 
120 

87 

30 



54 

54 



599 

592 

7 



88 362 

34 830 

19 

15 

4 



521 



23 

30 
130 
210 

96 
7 

25 



14 

78 

323 

94 

12 



521 
337 
48 



25 
65 

306 

108 

17 



23 

130 
220 
148 
2.1 



413 

17 

40 

52 

167 

137 

108 

28 

39 

13 

8 

20 



104 
94 



521 

510 

1) 



38 553 

25 480 

23 

17 

6 



1 042 



13 
174 
116 
314 
294 
46 
40 
45 



28 

399 

556 

43 

16 



1 037 

417 

223 

11 

11 



43 

104 

691 

163 

30 

11 



53 

295 
518 
176 
1.9 



784 

65 

165 

101 

215 

238 

258 

130 

62 

39 

12 

15 



74 

237 
202 



39 

1 031 

992 

39 

11 

11 



34 632 

18 918 

146 

57 

89 



106 



34 
31 
19 



25 
34 
41 



106 
97 
77 



35 
10 

17 
44 



42 

42 

7 

15 
1.0 



6 
19 
36 
45 

15 
23 

7 



23 

59 
45 



27 

106 

100 

6 



18 702 

15 307 

43 

20 

23 



712 



13 
84 
31 
32 
83 
45 
126 
298 



49 
184 
251 
167 
28 
33 



699 

712 

712 

6 

6 



225 
40 
299 
143 
5 



169 
343 
158 
42 
1.1 



292 

27 

86 

24 

59 

96 

420 

193 

178 

7 

25 

17 



59 

257 

142 

6 

65 

706 

686 

20 

6 

6 



29 738 
22 464 



29 
69 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 99 



Table 34. Selected Structural Characteristics of Housing Units With a White Householder: 1990- 

[Threshold and complementary threshold are 400 persons. Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Con. 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Totals for split tracts/BNA's in Florence County— Con. 



Tract 11 Tract 15.01 



Tract 16.01 



Florence city, Florence County 



Tract 7 (pt.) Tract 10 (pt.) 



Tract 1 1 (pt.) 



Remainder of Florence County 



Tract 2.01 (pt.) 



Tract 3 (pt.) 



Occupied housing units 

YEAR STRUaURE BUILT 

1989 to March 1990 - 

1985 to 1988 -- - - 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 - 

1960 to 1969 

1950 to 1959 

1940 to 1949 

1939 or earlier — 

BEDROOMS 

No bedroom 

1 bedroom 

2 bedrooms 

3 bedrooms 

4 bedrooms 

5 or more bedrooms 

SELECTED STRUCTURAL CHARACTERISTICS 

Complete kitchen facilities 

Source of water, public system or private company 

Sewage disposal, public sewer 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Renter-occupied housing units 

HOUSE HEATING FUEL 

Utility gas 

Bottled, tank, or LP gas 

Electricity 

Fuel oil, kerosene, etc. 

All other fuels 

No fuel used 

VEHICLES AVAILABLE 

None 

1 

2 

3 or more 

Vehicles per household 

YEAR HOUSEHOLDER MOVED INTO UNIT 

Owner-occupied housing units 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1969 or earlier 

Renter-occupied housing units 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1969 or earlier 

SELECTED CHARACTERISTICS 

No telephone in unit 

Householder 65 years and over 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

No telephone in unit 

No vehicle available 

Complete plumbing facilities 

1.00 or less persons per room 

1.01 or more persons per room 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

1.00 or less persons per room 

1.01 or more persons per room 

Mean household income in 1989: 

Owner-occupied housing units (dollars) 

Renter-occupied housing units (dollars) 

Household income in 1989 below poverty level 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Renter-occupied housing units 



1 844 



18 
75 
160 
167 
211 
384 
595 
234 



262 
774 
708 
100 



1 844 

1 844 

1 823 

10 

10 



542 

33 

850 

402 

9 

8 



150 
870 
608 
216 
1.5 



967 

109 
96 
117 
176 
469 
877 
351 
370 
110 
46 



585 
431 



132 

1 834 
1 834 

10 
10 



36 538 
24 746 

211 
76 

135 



1 173 



34 

290 

258 

433 

111 

19 

16 

12 



17 
273 
664 
204 

15 



1 173 
575 
200 



20 
66 
948 
90 
49 



27 

241 
680 
225 
2.0 



1 040 

107 

365 

183 

308 

77 

133 

68 

60 



42 

144 
131 



19 

1 173 

1 164 

9 



38 976 

18 919 

123 

85 

38 



1 068 



23 

125 
198 
403 
210 

90 
6 

13 



34 

328 

613 

83 

10 



1 068 
679 
645 



64 

900 

98 

6 



62 
306 
528 
172 

1.8 



803 

100 

195 

122 

223 

163 

265 

110 

110 

28 

9 

8 



177 
141 



30 

1 068 

1 050 

18 



34 720 

22 795 

115 

62 

53 



S3 



15 
14 
10 



15 

8 

24 



53 
53 
53 



35 
18 



32 
14 
7 



16 



10 
37 

15 
15 

7 



23 

30 
16 



17 

53 

47 

6 



31 123 

10 617 

33 

10 

23 



712 



13 
84 
31 
32 
83 
45 
126 
298 



49 
184 
251 
167 
28 
33 



699 

712 

712 

6 

6 



225 
40 
299 
143 
5 



169 
343 
158 
42 
1.1 



292 

27 

86 

24 

59 

96 

420 

193 

178 

7 

25 

17 



59 

257 

142 

6 

65 

706 

686 

20 

6 

6 



29 738 
22 464 



29 
69 



1 844 



18 
75 
160 
167 
211 
384 
595 
234 



262 
774 
708 
100 



1 844 

1 844 

1 823 

10 

10 



542 

33 

850 

402 

9 

8 



150 
870 
608 
216 
1.5 



967 

109 
96 
117 
176 
469 
877 
351 
370 
110 
46 



585 
431 



132 

1 834 
1 834 

10 
10 



36 538 
24 746 

211 
76 

135 



540 



24 
69 
135 
226 
59 
24 



17 

67 

239 

168 

49 



540 
477 
137 



17 

13 

469 

35 

6 



12 

56 

317 

155 

2.2 



468 

55 

134 
100 
132 
47 
72 
61 
8 



54 
54 



540 
533 

7 



89 812 

34 112 

19 

15 

4 



521 



23 

30 
130 
210 

96 
7 

25 



14 

78 

323 

94 

12 



521 
337 
48 



25 
65 

306 

108 

17 



23 

130 
220 
148 
2.1 



413 

17 

40 

52 

167 

137 

108 

28 

39 

13 

8 

20 



104 
94 



521 

510 

11 



38 553 

25 480 

23 

17 

6 



100 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 34. Selected Structural Characteristics of Housing Units With a White Householder: 1990— Con. 

[Threshold and complementary threshold are 400 persons. Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 4 



Tract 5 (pt.) Tract 15.01 (pt.) 



Tract 15.02 Tract 16.01 (pt.: 



Tract 16.02 



Tract 17 



Tract 18 



Occupied housing units 

YEAR STRUCTURE BUILT 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1960 to 1969 

1950 to 1959 

1940 to 1949 

1939 or earlier 

BEDROOMS 

No bedroom 

1 bedroom 

2 bedrooms 

3 bedrooms 

4 bedrooms 

5 or more bedrooms 

SELECTED STRUCTURAL CHARACTERISTICS 

Complete kitchen facilities 

Source of water, public system or private company 

Sewage disposal, public sewer 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Renter-occupied housing units 

HOUSE HEATING FUEL 

Utility gas 

Bottled, tank, or LP gas 

Electricity 

Fuel oil, kerosene, etc. 

All other fuels 

No fuel used 

VEHICLES AVAILABLE 

None 

1 

2 

3 or more 

Vehicles per household 

YEAR HOUSEHOLDER MOVED INTO UNIT 

Owner-occupied housing units 

1989 to March 1990.. 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1969 or earlier 

Renter-occupied housing units 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1969 or earlier 

SELECTED CHARACTERISTICS 

No telephone in unit 

Householder 65 years and over 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

No telephone in unit 

No vehicle available 

Complete plumbing facilities 

1.00 or less persons per room 

1.01 or more persons per room 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

1.00 or less persons per room 

1.01 or more persons per room 

Mean household income in 1989: 

Owner-occupied housing units (dollars) 

Renter-occupied housing units (dollars) 

Household income in 1989 below poverty level 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Renter-occupied housing units 



1 042 



1 042 



1 173 



1 089 



968 



944 



312 



920 



32 


13 


34 


56 


23 


41 


8 


23 


211 


174 


290 


193 


125 


128 


40 


128 


117 


116 


258 


192 


167 


142 


62 


65 


458 


314 


433 


346 


363 


168 


104 


240 


139 


294 


111 


159 


202 


112 


32 


161 


62 


46 


19 


60 


69 


159 


17 


124 


23 


40 


16 


9 


6 


68 


40 


49 




45 


12 


74 


13 


126 


9 


130 


57 










14 




2 


44 


28 


17 


18 


2 


- 


16 


14 


329 


399 


273 


333 


286 


312 


123 


204 


513 


556 


664 


593 


587 


517 


151 


608 


86 


43 


204 


128 


83 


101 


22 


80 


13 


16 


15 


17 


10 


— 


~ 


12 


1 042 


1 037 


1 173 


1 089 


968 


930 


312 


920 


684 


417 


575 


527 


605 


170 


25 


225 


261 


223 


200 


100 


571 


39 


_ 


224 


- 


11 


- 


25 


- 


23 


_ 


6 


- 


11 


- 


12 


- 


23 


- 


6 








13 








" 


13 


43 


20 


43 




6 




26 


46 


104 


66 


111 


64 


108 


44 


169 


782 


691 


948 


674 


821 


531 


193 


525 


139 


163 


90 


206 


77 


206 


41 


117 


62 


30 


49 


50 


6 


84 


27 


83 




11 




5 




9 


7 




26 


53 


27 


72 


19 


44 


23 


56 


369 


295 


241 


184 


287 


252 


81 


269 


507 


518 


680 


567 


490 


412 


105 


348 


140 


176 


225 


266 


172 


236 


103 


247 


1.8 


1.9 


2.0 


2.1 


1.9 


2.0 


2.1 


2.0 


741 


784 


1 040 


928 


782 


801 


263 


785 


103 


65 


107 


91 


100 


76 


31 


31 


175 


165 


365 


252 


174 


202 


63 


198 


162 


101 


183 


158 


122 


153 


51 


74 


197 


215 


308 


244 


223 


151 


87 


222 


104 


238 


77 


183 


163 


219 


31 


260 


301 


258 


133 


161 


186 


143 


49 


135 


231 


130 


68 


52 


102 


46 


13 


47 


54 


62 


60 


52 


66 


39 


11 


27 


8 


39 


- 


32 


6 


10 


25 


13 


3 


12 


- 


11 


4 


20 


_ 


43 


5 


15 


5 


14 


8 


28 


~~ 


5 


103 


74 


42 


74 


13 


43 


39 


60 


115 


237 


144 


223 


145 


168 


68 


257 


113 


202 


131 


204 


141 


147 


53 


215 


- 


- 


- 


5 


- 


- 


- 


6 


- 


- 


- 


5 


- 


- 


_ 


14 


7 


39 


19 


34 


4 


35 


11 


53 


1 042 


1 031 


1 173 


1 064 


968 


921 


312 


914 


1 005 


992 


1 164 


1 025 


950 


898 


291 


888 


37 


39 


9 


39 


18 


23 


21 


26 


- 


11 


- 


25 


- 


23 


_ 


6 


- 


11 


: 


25 


— 


23 


_ 


6 


31 968 


34 632 


38 976 


35 706 


34 954 


33 772 


30 631 


31 943 


13 161 


18 918 


18 919 


26 660 


27 844 


24 556 


19 146 


22 388 


204 


146 


123 


83 


86 


114 


44 


148 


56 


57 


85 


46 


62 


86 


44 


108 


148 


89 


38 


37 


24 


28 


- 


40 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 101 



Table 34. 



Selected Structural Characteristics of Housing Units With a White Householder: 1990— Con. 



[Threshold and complementary threshold are 400 persons. Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 19 



Tract 20 



Tract 22.01 



Tract 22.02 



Tract 23 



Tract 24.' 



Tract 25 



Tract 26 



Occupied housing units 

YEAR STRUQURE BUILT 

1989 to March 1990 - 

1985 to 1988 - - 

1980 to 1984 ■ 

1970 to 1979 „ - - 

1960 to 1969 - 

1950 to 1959 - 

1940 to 1949 - — 

1939 or earlier -- — 

BEDROOMS 

No bedroom 

1 bedroom 

2 bedrooms 

3 bedrooms 

4 bedrooms 

5 or more bedrooms 

SELECTED STRUCTURAL CHARACTERISTICS 

Complete kitchen facilities 

Source of water, public system or private company 

Sewage disposal, public sewer 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Renter-occupied housing units 

HOUSE HEATING FUEL 

Utility gas 

Bottled, tank, or LP gas 

Electricity 

Fuel oil, kerosene, etc. 

All other fuels 

No fuel used 

VEHICLES AVAILABLE 

None 

1 — 

2 — 

3 or more 

Vehicles per household 

YEAR HOUSEHOLDER MOVED INTO UNIT 

Owner-occupied housing units 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1969 or earlier 

Renter-occupied housing units 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1969 or earlier 

SELECTED CHARACTERISTICS 

No telephone in unit 

Householder 65 years and over 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

No telephone in unit 

No vehicle available 

Complete plumbing facilities 

1.00 or less persons per room 

1 .01 or more persons per room 

Locking complete plumbing facilities 

1 .00 or less persons per room 

1 .01 or more persons per room 

Mean household income in 1989: 

Owner-occupied housing units (dollars) 

Renter-occupied housing units (dollars) 

Household income in 1989 below poverty level 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Renter-occupied housing units 



1 579 



183 



990 



103 



593 



28 



745 



923 



27 



109 



941 



68 



671 



17 



565 



46 


32 


10 


- 


26 


66 


46 


5 


157 


108 


36 


- 


89 


80 


56 


58 


152 


132 


121 


37 


101 


98 


116 


98 


482 


196 


95 


136 


238 


216 


141 


85 


387 


190 


136 


160 


198 


131 


109 


77 


153 


128 


55 


189 


119 


178 


76 


57 


96 


103 


110 


85 


50 


37 


56 


71 


106 


101 


30 


138 


102 


135 


71 


114 


13 


4 






2 








36 


27 


24 


16 


12 


- 


12 


11 


436 


344 


223 


155 


227 


305 


199 


191 


905 


551 


264 


432 


634 


511 


400 


307 


165 


43 


68 


112 


35 


115 


60 


44 


24 


21 


14 


30 


13 


10 


— 


12 


1 553 


976 


585 


745 


912 


941 


671 


565 


941 


208 


372 


672 


84 


230 


_ 


309 


568 


44 


345 


677 


39 


214 


9 


288 


18 


22 


16 


4 


11 


5 


6 


2 


7 


8 


- 


- 


9 


5 


6 


_ 


11 


14 


16 


4 


2 


" 


— 


2 


125 


56 


67 


181 


85 


3 


37 


1 


100 


178 


105 


18 


91 


168 


156 


127 


1 019 


548 


361 


439 


496 


570 


362 


343 


206 


152 


52 


75 


141 


146 


66 


84 


124 


56 


- 


32 


110 


50 


43 


10 


5 




8 






4 


7 


~ 


126 


68 


88 


49 


75 


94 


36 


28 


444 


343 


226 


251 


265 


271 


172 


192 


691 


404 


173 


333 


369 


418 


339 


276 


318 


175 


106 


112 


214 


158 


124 


69 


1.8 


1.8 


1.6 


1.8 


1.9 


1.8 


1.9 


1.7 


1 258 


806 


405 


622 


793 


793 


581 


447 


146 


50 


25 


45 


60 


73 


75 


26 


264 


152 


84 


73 


165 


181 


124 


93 


162 


115 


85 


80 


120 


92 


134 


113 


388 


198 


64 


147 


179 


191 


98 


68 


298 


291 


147 


277 


269 


256 


150 


147 


321 


184 


188 


123 


130 


148 


90 


118 


128 


76 


57 


53 


36 


52 


5 


46 


79 


74 


77 


43 


39 


46 


31 


30 


28 


16 


23 


6 


20 


21 


24 


28 


48 


4 


20 


17 


16 


21 


17 


2 


38 


14 


11 


4 


19 


8 


13 


12 



43 



326 




253 




254 




245 


199 




252 




171 




165 


255 




225 




155 




228 


167 




214 




111 




156 


- 




8 




8 




- 


2 




- 




6 




_ 


13 




13 




8 




6 


10 




17 




_ 




8 


77 




41 




53 




25 


63 




67 




36 




11 


1 561 




968 




577 




741 


912 




936 




665 




563 


1 502 




945 




569 




741 


905 




918 




659 




563 


59 




23 




8 




- 


7 




18 




6 




_ 


18 




22 




16 




4 


11 




5 




6 




2 


18 




22 




16 




4 


11 




5 




6 




2 


36 995 


26 


194 


30 960 


47 


644 


24 488 


25 


563 


33 466 


29 


653 


22 130 


16 


302 


16 


197 


25 395 


16 036 


20 


708 


15 


575 


26 


156 


259 




182 




95 




90 


193 




148 




80 




92 


149 




112 




57 




59 


154 




84 




41 




63 


110 




70 




38 




31 


39 




64 




39 




29 



102 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 35. Financial Characteristics of Housing Units With a White Householder: 1990 

[Threshold ond complementary threshold are 400 persons. Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms ond meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Florence, SC MSA 



Florence County 



Total 



Florence city 



Totals for split tracts/BNA's in Florence County 



Tract 2.01 



Tract 3 



Tract 5 



Tract 7 



Tract 10 



Specified owner-occupied housing units 

SELECTED MONTHLY OWNER COSTS 

With a mortgage 

Less than $300 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 to $599 

$600 to $799 

$800 to $999 

$1,000 to $1,499 

$1,500 to $1,999 

$2,000 or more 

Median (dollars) 

Not mortgaged 

Less than $100 

$100 to $199 

$200 to $299 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 or more 

Median (dollors) 

HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 BY SELECTED 
MONTHLY OWNER COSTS AS A PERCENTAGE OF 
HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 

Less than $20,000 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$20,000 to $34,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$35,000 to $49,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$50,000 or more 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

Specified renter-occupied housing units 

GROSS RENT 

Less than $100 

$100 to $199 

$200 to $299 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 to $599 

$600 to $749 

$750 to $999 

$1,000 or more 

No cash rent 

Median (dollors) 

HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 BY GROSS RENT AS 
A PERCENTAGE OF HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 

Less than $10,000 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent __ 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$10,000 to $19,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$20,000 to $34,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent --- 

25 to 29 percent - 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$35,000 or more- 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 



14 038 

9 025 

851 
1 015 
1 224 

1 492 

2 169 

1 202 
728 
186 
158 
595 

5 013 
314 

2 460 
1 664 

364 
158 
53 
191 



3 336 

1 004 

437 

310 

276 

1 151 

158 

27.4 

3 134 

1 832 

471 

434 

199 



17.2 

3 405 

2 472 
579 
258 

55 
41 

15.1 

4 163 

3 610 
354 

91 

63 

37 

8 

12.1 

5 990 

84 

445 

889 

1 421 

1 597 

566 

259 

163 

10 

556 

390 



1 457 

32 

50 

100 

56 

891 

328 

50.0+ 

1 462 

198 

227 

240 

259 

424 

114 

30.2 

1 793 

937 

471 

172 

54 

19 

140 

19.1 

1 278 

1 076 

65 

33 



14 038 



9 025 

851 
1 015 
1 224 

1 492 

2 169 

1 202 
728 
186 
158 
595 

5 013 
314 

2 460 
1 664 

364 
158 
53 
191 



3 336 

1 004 

437 

310 

276 

1 151 

158 

27.4 

3 134 

1 832 

471 

434 

199 



17.2 

3 405 

2 472 
579 
258 

55 
41 

15.1 

4 163 

3 610 
354 

91 

63 

37 

8 

12.1 

5 990 

84 

445 

889 

1 421 

1 597 

566 

259 

163 

10 

556 

390 



1 457 

32 

50 

100 

56 

891 

328 

50.0+ 

1 462 

198 

227 

240 

259 

424 

114 

30.2 

1 793 

937 

471 

172 

54 

19 

140 

19.1 

1 278 

1 076 

65 

33 



104 
12.6 



104 
12.6 



4 078 

2 608 

75 
265 
327 
357 
705 
362 
320 
129 

68 

667 

1 470 

10 
593 
579 
142 
109 

37 
220 



731 

205 

83 

55 

62 

288 

38 

30.3 

935 

531 

143 

126 

60 

75 

17.5 

974 

713 

148 

84 

16 

13 

15.9 
1 438 

1 239 
113 

39 
32 
15 

12.1 

2 237 

39 
187 
234 
361 
732 
393 
102 
118 
4 

67 
435 



457 

18 

30 

55 

41 

270 

43 

50.0+ 

497 

85 

39 

74 

66 

224 

9 

33.5 

693 

318 

233 

92 

18 

13 

19 

20.4 

590 

528 

31 

14 



17 
13.2 



435 

288 

8 

7 

6 

34 

40 

47 

71 

23 

52 

1 Oil 

147 

30 
97 
10 
10 

240 



63 
15 
16 

6 

26 

30.4 

33 

5 

4 

11 

13 

28.4 

61 
40 
14 



10.2 
278 
187 
46 
18 
17 
10 

13.8 
120 



53 

31 

29 



7 
506 



37.5 
38 



26.6 
72 
62 

7 



3 
14.4 



351 

239 

25 
28 
28 

61 
42 
42 
13 



560 
112 

12 

44 

44 

9 

3 

200 



81 
14 
13 
19 

2 
28 

5 
27.9 
78 
34 
20 
14 
10 



21.3 

83 

58 

16 

6 

3 



15.1 

109 

97 

12 



12.2 
96 



7 
16 
24 
29 
13 

7 



413 



50.0+ 
35 



20 

7 



24.4 
46 
32 
14 



18.2 
9 
9 



12.5 



379 

273 

63 

47 
35 
68 
39 
21 



481 
106 

71 
35 



180 



130 
57 
26 



47 

21.5 
122 

47 
47 
15 
13 



21.5 
79 
79 



10.0- 
48 

41 

7 



10.0- 
249 



23 
23 
110 
63 
9 



12 
366 



92 



80 

12 

50.0+ 

75 

6 

28 

16 
25 

31.1 
49 
25 
12 



12 

15.9 

33 

24 



16.3 



26 



26 

10 
10 
6 



165 



20 
10 



10 
25.0 



10.0- 
37 



22 



194 
23 

23 
50.0+ 



17.5 



243 

134 

17 
22 
37 
44 
14 



472 
109 

4 
60 
45 



186 



69 
32 

5 
15 

5 
12 

22.5 

110 

69 

22 

16 

3 



16.5 

45 

42 

3 



15.9 
19 
19 



10.0- 
420 



17 

106 

81 

78 

21 

19 

85 

4 

9 

401 



94 
17 

77 

50.0+ 
140 
38 
24 
30 

48 

26.3 

118 

72 

26 

7 

13 

19.1 
68 
45 

14 



9 
10.0- 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 103 



Table 35. Financial Characteristics of Housing Units With a White Householder: 1990— Con. 

[Threshold and complementary threshold are 400 persons. Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Totals for split tracts/BNA's in Florence County— Con. 



Tract 1 1 



Tract 15.01 



Tract 16.01 



Florence city, Florence County 



Tract 7 (pt.) 



Tract 10 (pt.) 



Tract 1 1 (pt.) 



Remainder of Florence County 



Tract 2.01 (pt.) 



Tract 3 (pt.) 



Specified owner-occupied housing units 

SELECTED MONTHLY OWNER COSTS 

With o mortgage 

Less than $300 

$300 to $399 - 

$400 to $499 — — 

$500 to $599 - — 

$600 to $799 — 

$800 to $999 — 

$1,000 to $1,499 — — 

$1,500 to $1,999 

$2,000 or more -- 

Median (dollars) 

Not mortgaged 

Less thon $100 

$100 to $199 - - 

$200 to $299 - 

$300 to $399 — 

$400 to $499 — 

$500 or more 

Median (dollars) 

HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 BY SELECTED 
MONTHLY OWNER COSTS AS A PERCENTAGE OF 
HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 

Less than $20,000 — 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent — 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed - 

Median 

$20,000 to $34,999 - 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$35,000 to $49,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent — 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$50,000 or more 

Less thon 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent — 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

Specified renter-occupied housing units 

GROSS RENT 

Less than $100 

$100 to $199 

$200 to $299 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 to $599 

$600 to $749 

$750 to $999 

$1,000 or more 

No cash rent 

Median (dollars) 

HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 BY GROSS RENT AS 
A PERCENTAGE OF HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 

Less than $10,000 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$10,000 to $19,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$20,000 to $34,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$35,000 or more 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 



940 

494 

27 
107 
98 
60 
145 
32 
25 



551 
446 

6 

245 

124 

41 

5 

25 

191 



318 

110 

28 

23 

29 

123 

5 

29.0 

266 

134 

36 

21 

39 

36 

19.8 

197 

142 

45 

10 



14.0 

159 

154 

5 



10.0- 
877 

11 
109 
100 
202 
303 
115 

17 



20 

402 



188 
11 

55 
33 
89 

34.2 
202 

30 
9 

29 

41 

84 

9 

33.5 

301 

159 

90 

41 



11 
19.3 
186 
186 



12.4 



542 

427 

25 

19 
13 
42 
149 
111 
50 
5 

13 
758 
115 

67 

39 

9 



187 



102 
42 



6 
54 

41.0 
48 
12 

13 
8 

15 

29.6 
178 

90 
52 
31 

5 



19.9 

214 

168 

35 

5 
6 

15.8 
133 



11 
25 
46 
26 



16 
326 



24 
7 
50.0+ 
48 
14 
15 
7 
6 
6 

23.3 

44 
30 



5 
17.8 

10 
6 



4 
12.5 



555 

408 

58 
25 

119 
89 
88 

11 
18 



502 
147 
25 
73 

40 
9 



176 



134 
38 

8 

27 
61 

33.9 

149 

88 

39 

16 



18.5 
120 
80 
30 

10 



17.3 
152 
152 



10.0- 
259 

28 
17 
14 
44 
69 
20 
16 
8 

43 
405 



55 

7 
13 

8 
8 

19 
24.2 

58 

17 
5 
4 
5 

27 

33.0 

91 

12 

57 

6 

6 

10 

22.5 

55 

22 

4 

4 



25 

15.0 



16 



16 



10 
6 



190 



10 
37.5 



10.0- 
37 



22 
8 



194 



23 



23 
50.0+ 



17.5 



243 

134 

17 
22 
37 
44 
14 



472 
109 

4 
60 
45 



186 



69 
32 

5 
15 

5 
12 

22.5 

110 

69 

22 

16 

3 



16.5 

45 

42 

3 



15.9 
19 
19 



10.0- 
420 



17 

106 

81 

78 

21 

19 

85 

4 

9 

401 



94 
17 

77 

50.0+ 
140 
38 
24 
30 

48 

26.3 

118 
72 
26 

7 

13 

19.1 
68 
45 

14 



9 
10.0- 



940 

494 

27 
107 
98 
60 
145 
32 
25 



551 
446 

6 

245 

124 

41 

5 

25 
191 



318 

110 

28 

23 

29 

123 

5 

29.0 

266 

134 

36 

21 

39 

36 

19.8 
197 
142 

45 
10 



14.0 

159 

154 

5 



10.0- 
877 

11 
109 
100 
202 
303 
115 

17 



20 
402 



188 
11 

55 
33 
89 

34.2 

202 

30 

9 

29 

41 

84 

9 

33.5 

301 

159 

90 

41 



11 
19.3 
186 
186 



12.4 



424 

277 

8 

7 

6 

23 

40 

47 

71 

23 

52 

040 

147 

30 
97 

10 
10 

240 



63 
15 
16 

6 
26 

30.4 

22 

5 

4 



13 

50.0+ 

61 
40 
14 



10.2 
278 
187 

46 
18 
17 
10 

13.8 
72 



26 
10 
29 



7 
532 



37.5 

18 



29.5 
44 
34 

7 



3 
13.9 



351 

239 

25 
28 
28 
61 
42 
42 
13 



560 
112 

12 

44 

44 

9 

3 

200 



81 
14 
13 
19 

2 
28 

5 
27.9 
78 
34 
20 
14 
10 



21.3 
83 

58 
16 
6 
3 



15.1 

109 

97 

12 



12.2 
96 



7 
16 
24 
29 
13 

7 



413 



50.0+ 
35 



20 

7 



24.4 
46 
32 
14 



18.2 
9 
9 



12.5 



104 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 35. Financial Characteristics of Housing Units With a White Householder: 1990— Con. 

[Threshold and complementary threshold are 400 persons. Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



ct 4 


Tract 5 (pt.) 


Tract 15.01 (pt.) 


352 


379 


542 


266 


273 


427 


38 


63 


25 


62 


47 


19 


39 


35 


13 


54 


68 


42 


43 


39 


149 


30 


21 


111 


- 


- 


50 


- 


- 


5 


- 


- 


13 


491 


481 


758 


86 


106 


115 


12 


- 


- 


60 


71 


67 


14 


35 


39 


- 


- 


9 



Tract 15.02 Tract 16.01 (pt.) 



(pt.) 


Tract 16.02 


534 


375 


387 


217 


58 


7 


25 


41 


98 


65 


89 


39 


88 


59 


11 


- 


18 


6 


512 


492 


147 


158 


25 


26 


73 


85 


40 


47 


9 


- 



Tract 17 



Tract 18 



Specified owner-occupied housing units 

SELECTED MONTHLY OWNER COSTS 

With o mortgage 

Less than $300 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 to $599 

$600 to $799 

$800 to $999 

$1,000 to $1,499 

$1,500 to $1,999 

$2,000 or more 

Median (dollars) 

Not mortgaged 

Less than $100 

$100 to $199 

$200 to $299 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 or more 

Median (dollars) 

HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 BY SELECTED 
MONTHLY OWNER COSTS AS A PERCENTAGE OF 
HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 

Less than $20,000 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent __ 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$20,000 to $34,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent __ 

30 to 34 percent — 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$35,000 to $49,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$50,000 or more 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

Specified renter-occupied housing units 

GROSS RENT 

Less than $100 

$100 to $199 

$200 to $299 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 to $599 

$600 to $749 

$750 to $999 

$1,000 or more - 

No cash rent 

Median (dollars) 

HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 BY GROSS RENT AS 
A PERCENTAGE OF HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 

Less than $10,000 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$10,000 to $19,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent „ 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$20,000 to $34,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$35,000 or more 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent - 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 



141 



55 
29 

5 
6 
10 
5 

18.9 
108 
80 

18 

10 

16.7 

135 

117 

18 



13.0 
54 
54 



13.7 
297 



7 

82 
132 
34 
30 



12 
329 



119 



53 

66 

50.0+ 

94 

7 

25 
40 
19 
3 
31.7 
76 
44 

25 



7 

18.0 

8 

8 



17.5 



180 



130 
57 
26 



47 

21.5 
122 
47 
47 
15 
13 



21.5 
79 
79 



10.0- 
48 
41 

7 



10.0- 
249 



23 
23 

110 

63 

9 



12 
366 



92 



80 
12 
50.0+ 
75 
6 
28 

16 
25 

31.1 
49 
25 
12 



12 

15.9 

33 

24 



16.3 



187 



102 
42 



6 
54 

41.0 
48 
12 

13 
8 
15 

29.6 
178 
90 
52 

31 
5 



19.9 

214 

168 

35 

5 
6 

15.8 
133 



11 
25 
46 
26 



16 
326 



24 
7 
50.0+ 
48 
14 
15 
7 
6 
6 

23.3 

44 
30 



5 

17.8 

10 

6 



4 
12.5 



432 
300 

23 
39 
78 
80 
60 
20 



638 
132 

18 
54 
33 
12 

15 

193 



49 
27 



8 

18.6 
129 
53 
38 

7 
24 

7 

21.5 
126 
84 
42 



16.8 

128 

120 

8 



12.1 
142 



11 
38 
28 
35 



23 

353 



40 
6 



26 

8 

50.0+ 

30 

19 

6 
5 



18.3 
29 
23 



6 

15.6 

43 

27 

7 



9 
12.1 



176 



134 
38 



27 

61 

33.9 

128 
88 

18 
16 



17.4 
120 
80 

30 

10 



17.3 
152 
152 



10.0- 
186 



4 
39 
64 
20 
16 



35 
438 



11 

50.0+ 

32 



27 

50.0+ 

85 

6 

57 

6 

6 

10 

22.8 

50 

17 



25 
16.8 



168 



94 

25 

6 

17 

9 

28 

9 

28.4 

133 

102 

13 

6 

12 



10.9 
66 
50 
16 



14.3 

82 

76 

6 



10.0 
123 



21 

11 

56 

6 

14 



15 
325 



5 

10 

50.0+ 

36 

17 
9 



2 

25.0 

60 

45 

12 



3 

16.1 

12 

12 



10.0- 



88 

45 

5 
5 
4 
6 

16 
9 



868 
43 

18 
25 



112 



23 
5 



6 

6 

6 

32.9 

31 

25 



10.0- 
13 
4 



26.4 
21 
21 



16.7 
49 



10 



13 

15 



11 
392 



15 

37.5 
23 
23 



15.6 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 



445 

226 

19 
49 
60 
52 
31 
9 
6 



480 
219 

30 

126 

52 

9 

2 

161 



166 
46 
20 
15 
14 
56 
15 
28.2 
95 
64 
19 
11 
1 



16.4 

101 



10.0- 

83 

77 

6 



10.0- 
101 



54 
321 



40 



2 

8 

30 

50 0+ 

17 



11 
27.5 

26 
13 



13 
12.5 

18 

18 



10.0- 

105 



Table 35. Financial Characteristics of Housing Units With a White Householder: 1990— Con. 

[Threshold and complementary threshold are 400 persons. Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Specified owner-occupied housing units 

SELECTED MONTHLY OWNER COSTS 

With a mortgage 

Less than $300 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 to $599 

$600 to $799 

$800 to $999 

$1,000 to $1,499. 

$1,500 to $1,999 

$2,000 or more 

Median (dollars) 

Not mortgaged 

Less than $100 

$100 to $199 

$200 to $299 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 or more 

Median (dollars) 

HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 BY SELECTED 
MONTHLY OWNER COSTS AS A PERCENTAGE OF 
HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 

Less than $20,000— 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$20,000 to $34,999 "... 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$35,000 to $49,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$50,000 or more 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

Specified renter-occupied housing units 

GROSS RENT 

Less than $100 

$100 to $199 

$200 to $299 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 to $599 

$600 to $749 

$750 to $999 

$1,000 or more 

No cash rent 

Median (dollars) 

HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 BY GROSS RENT AS 
A PERCENTAGE OF HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 

Less than $10,000 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$10,000 to $19,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$20,000 to $34,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$35,000 or more 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 19 



Tract 20 



Tract 22.01 



Tract 22.02 



689 

358 

49 
86 

70 
62 
58 
27 
6 



462 
331 

41 

183 

86 

13 

5 

3 

178 



251 

101 

29 

15 

10 

90 

6 

23.7 

146 

101 

12 

24 

3 

6 

15.6 
154 
132 

14 



10.0- 

138 

123 

5 



10.3 
286 

3 
31 
86 
71 
29 
7 
5 



54 
297 



69 



10 

45 
14 
46.9 
85 
16 
26 
21 

7 

15 

23.7 

74 

53 

3 



18 

15.2 

58 

49 



9 
10.0- 



392 

166 

71 
25 
7 
22 
38 



340 
226 

25 

125 

68 

8 



176 



153 

71 

19 

11 

23 

27 

2 

21.2 

118 

85 

2 

16 
11 
4 

10.0- 

74 

68 

6 



10.0- 
47 
47 



10.0- 
145 

10 
25 
33 
51 
6 



20 
265 



47 
4 
4 
2 

31 

6 

50.0+ 

50 

11 

2 

15 

10 

5 

7 

27.8 

41 

36 



5 

11.6 

7 

5 



2 
10.0- 



333 

179 

24 
46 
15 
51 
5 

16 
22 



511 
154 

122 
22 

10 



167 



113 

27 

26 
13 
36 
11 
29.6 
68 
35 

33 



19.7 

90 

69 

5 

16 



10.0- 
62 
40 
12 
10 



10.0- 
180 

12 
31 
64 
28 
20 



25 
278 



75 

12 

12 
44 

7 

39.5 

41 

8 



22 

11 
31.6 

50 

34 

9 



7 

15.2 

14 

14 



10.0- 



543 

287 

51 
25 
51 
61 
50 
24 
14 

11 
527 
256 

6 
92 
83 
67 

8 
247 



190 
36 
39 
38 

6 

59 
12 
26.8 
76 
52 

8 
10 



16.3 

120 

89 

21 

10 



13.7 
157 

142 

15 



10.0- 
117 



10 

20 

49 

9 

10 
6 



13 
338 



31 
4 



20 

7 

50.0+ 

24 

7 
10 



7 

25.7 

31 

11 

15 



21.5 
31 
25 



6 
10.0- 



t 23 


Tract 24.98 


372 


395 


201 


159 


55 


34 


30 


41 


50 


33 


32 


27 


9 


19 


25 


2 


_ 


3 


435 


425 


171 


236 


27 


16 


115 


122 


29 


69 


- 


28 



Tract 25 



Tract 26 



137 



167 

45 
34 
14 

6 
59 

9 

25.0 

82 

61 

21 



12.0 
82 
57 
13 
12 



13.4 
41 
41 



10.0- 
124 

4 

7 

33 

25 

7 



48 
268 



32 



13 

13 

38.5 

51 
7 
11 

1 

1 

31 

21.4 

38 

34 



4 

16.3 

3 

3 



10.0- 



187 



190 

26 

55 

21 

33 

51 

4 

27.9 

101 

85 

9 

3 



13.2 
54 
54 



10.0- 
50 
50 



10.0- 
144 

8 

5 

33 

46 

2 



47 
304 



63 
4 



34 

20 

50.0+ 

18 

3 



27.5 
32 

18 
3 



11 

13.8 

31 

15 



16 
10.0- 



249 

157 

15 
17 
32 
84 
9 



520 
92 



67 
25 



174 



38 

32 

6 



13.0 

86 

59 

21 

6 



14.6 

105 

96 

9 



14.1 
20 
20 



10.0- 
81 



12 
33 



36 

212 



46 



25 
21 
50.0+ 
16 
11 



5 
17.5 

10 



10 



10.0- 



279 

155 

23 

21 
22 
24 
49 
14 
2 



561 
124 

4 
66 
48 

2 

4 

191 



122 
32 
20 
12 

4 
49 

5 
27.7 
60 
30 
10 
16 

2 

2 

20.0 
49 
42 

7 



16.2 

48 

45 

3 



ico- 
ns 



11 
14 
37 
25 
9 
3 



19 
363 



34 



1 
1 

25 

7 

48.5 

40 
4 
1 

11 
6 
8 

10 
29.5 

16 
7 
6 
2 



1 

20.4 

28 

25 



3 
10.2 



106 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 






Table 36. Selected Structural Characteristics of Housing Units With a Black Householder: 1990 

[Threshold is 400 persons. Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Florence, SC 
MSA 



Florence County 



Total Florence city 



Totals for split tracts/BNA's in Florence County 



Tract 2.01 



Tract 3 



Tract 5 



Tract 7 



Tract 8 



Tract 9 



Tract 10 



Occupied housing units 

YEAR STRUCTURE BUILT 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1960 to 1969 

1950 to 1959 

1940 to 1949 

1939 or earlier 

BEDROOMS 

No bedroom 

1 bedroom 

2 bedrooms 

3 bedrooms 

4 bedrooms 

5 or more bedrooms 

SELECTED STRUCTURAL CHARACTERISTICS 

Complete kitchen facilities 

Source of water, public system or private company 

Sewage disposal, public sewer 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Renter-occupied housing units 

HOUSE HEATING FUEL 

Utility gas 

Bottled, tank, or LP gas 

Electricity 

Fuel oil, kerosene, etc. 

All other fuels 

No fuel used 

VEHICLES AVAILABLE 

None 

1 

2 

3 or more 

Vehicles per household 

YEAR HOUSEHOLDER MOVED INTO UNIT 

Owner-occupied housing units 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1969 or earlier 

Renter-occupied housing units 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1969 or earlier 

SELECTED CHARACTERISTICS 

No telephone in unit 

Householder 65 years and over 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

No telephone in unit 

No vehicle available 

Complete plumbing facilities 

1 .00 or less persons per room 

1 .01 or more persons per room 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

1.00 or less persons per room 

1.01 or more persons per room 

Mean household income in 1989: 

Owner-occupied housing units (dollars) 

Renter-occupied housing units (dollors) 

Household income in 1989 below poverty level 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Renter-occupied housing units 



13 501 



277 

1 209 

1 373 
4 619 

2 407 
1 795 
1 006 

815 



85 
1 007 
4 234 
6 709 
1 284 
182 



13 159 

9 676 

8 109 

564 

175 

389 



118 
421 
763 
969 
196 
34 



3 786 

4 891 
3 135 
1 689 

1.2 



929 

554 
563 
124 
490 
198 
572 
821 
992 
792 
647 
320 



2 750 

2 973 

2 121 

167 

425 

1 266 

12 937 
11 467 

1 470 
564 
438 
126 

23 695 

13 556 
5 131 

2 122 

3 009 



13 501 



277 
1 209 

1 373 
4 619 

2 407 
1 795 
1 006 

815 



85 

1 007 
4 234 
6 709 
1 284 
182 



13 159 

9 676 

8 109 

564 

175 

389 



2 118 

1 421 
5 763 

2 969 
1 196 

34 



3 786 

4 891 
3 135 
1 689 

1.2 



929 

554 
563 
124 
490 
198 
572 
821 
1 992 
792 
647 
320 



2 750 



973 
121 
167 
425 
266 

937 
467 
470 
564 
438 
126 



23 695 
13 556 
5 131 

2 122 

3 009 



4 500 



41 
160 
276 
461 
796 
789 
568 
409 



48 
576 
603 
848 
385 

40 



4 434 

4 437 

4 319 

84 

35 

49 



1 221 

309 

1 544 

1 215 

211 



1 648 

1 558 

942 

352 

1.0 



2 047 

70 
225 
177 
738 
837 
2 453 
794 
895 
344 
264 
156 



883 

1 166 

784 

38 

173 

525 

4 416 

4 021 

395 

84 

76 

8 



24 162 
13 501 

1 743 
437 

1 306 



129 



29 
23 
51 

22 
4 



19 
47 
63 



129 
111 
75 



11 

114 

4 



7 
64 
54 

4 
1.4 



95 

15 
43 
18 
11 
8 
34 
19 



129 

120 

9 



24 643 

18 544 

16 

9 

7 



719 



15 

41 

378 

231 

30 

22 

2 



15 

91 

576 

32 

5 



719 
600 
185 

4 



42 

29 

536 

85 

16 

11 



70 
210 
294 
145 

1.7 



606 

42 
129 
122 
223 

90 
113 

43 

42 
9 

19 



39 

87 
80 



715 

677 

38 

4 



32 529 

25 511 

62 

40 

22 



293 



56 

41 

107 

65 

7 

5 

2 



6 
9 

100 
178 



288 

215 

129 

4 



201 
64 

7 



38 
137 
95 
23 
1.4 



162 

105 

14 

31 

12 

131 

87 

30 

5 

7 

2 



56 
3 



289 

228 

61 

4 

4 



29 761 
16 313 

78 
9 

69 



1 284 



22 

74 
81 
525 
236 
169 
112 
65 



7 
200 
450 
480 
139 



1 253 

1 050 

1 002 

51 

14 

37 



416 
123 
277 
364 
104 



598 
401 
197 



548 

30 

52 

56 

167 

243 

736 

266 

208 

95 

121 

46 



317 

386 

221 

17 

58 

215 

233 

115 
118 
51 
43 



24 174 

11 903 

579 

149 

430 



1 730 



37 
33 
725 
341 
266 
179 
149 



147 
411 
941 
211 
20 



1 726 

1 691 

1 637 

10 

5 

5 



403 
136 
710 
411 
70 



586 
555 
347 
242 
1.2 



1 022 

14 

88 

79 

409 

432 

708 

197 

248 

99 

102 

62 



258 

420 

352 

5 

48 

165 

1 720 

1 567 

153 

10 

10 



25 089 

13 115 

651 

246 

405 



1 315 



24 

61 
106 
197 
299 
339 
155 
134 



27 
170 
517 
526 

66 
9 



1 283 

1 182 

1 125 

39 

22 

17 



232 
146 
344 
516 
77 



470 
509 
234 
102 
1.0 



616 

6 

47 

46 

202 

315 

699 

153 

232 

136 

90 

88 



270 

422 
255 

22 
77 
178 

1 276 

1 136 

140 

39 

34 

5 



22 222 

11 044 

553 

141 

412 



184 



7 

27 
21 

37 
29 
28 
35 



14 
28 

107 
27 



177 

184 
184 

7 



99 
5 

59 
13 
8 



100 
40 
44 



25 

16 
9 

159 

67 
84 

8 



55 

26 

18 



26 

177 

166 

11 

7 

7 



14 583 
18 277 

57 
9 

48 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 107 



Table 36. Selected Structural Characteristics of Housing Units With a Black Householder: 1990— Con. 

[Threshold is 400 persons. Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Occupied housing units 

YEAR STRUCTURE BUILT 

1989 to March 1990 — 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 - 

1970 to 1979 

1960 to 1969 

1950 to 1959 

1940 to 1949 

1939 or earlier 

BEDROOMS 

No bedroom 

1 bedroom 

2 bedrooms 

3 bedrooms 

4 bedrooms 

5 or more bedrooms 

SELECTED STRUCTURAL CHARACTERISTICS 

Complete kitchen facilities 

Source of water, public system or private company 

Sewage disposal, public sewer 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Renter-occupied housing units 

HOUSE HEATING FUEL 

Utility gas 

Bottled, tank, or LP gas 

Electricity 

Fuel oil, kerosene, etc. 

All other fuels 

No fuel used 

VEHICLES AVAILABLE 

None 

1 

2 

3 or more 

Vehicles per household 

YEAR HOUSEHOLDER MOVED INTO UNIT 

Owner-occupied housing units 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1969 or earlier 

Renter-occupied housing units 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1969 or earlier 

SELECTED CHARACTERISTICS 

No telephone in unit 

Householder 65 years and over 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Locking complete plumbing facilities 

No telephone in unit 

No vehicle available 

Complete plumbing facilities 

1.00 or less persons per room 

1.01 or more persons per room 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

1.00 or less persons per room 

1.01 or more persons per room 

Mean household income in 1989: 

Owner-occupied housing units (dollars) 

Renter-occupied housing units (dollars) 

Household income in 1989 below poverty level 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Renter-occupied housing units 



Totals for split tracts/BNA's in Florence County- 
Con. 



Tract 1 1 



Tract 15.01 



Tract 16.01 



344 



9 
11 
48 
51 

6 
85 
86 
48 



27 
249 



336 
344 
336 



159 
11 
86 



64 

204 



1.1 



86 

11 
34 

15 

26 

258 

107 
132 

19 



42 

54 
46 



344 

320 

24 



26 778 

19 049 

87 

87 



628 



53 
110 
294 
90 
14 
57 
10 



9 

24 

170 

328 

92 

5 



624 

273 

59 

33 

5 

28 



15 

46 

281 

208 

78 



61 
226 
176 
165 

1.7 



498 

79 

87 

232 

100 

130 

25 

53 

12 

29 

11 



66 

115 
93 
11 
17 
25 

595 

530 
65 
33 
33 



27 003 

13 049 

167 

93 

74 



373 



22 
74 
203 
26 
30 

18 



23 
124 
209 

17 



367 

329 

329 

6 

6 



16 

8 

288 

35 

26 



27 
165 
114 

67 
1.6 



192 

31 
60 
57 
36 
8 
181 
87 
74 
20 



367 
278 



28 342 
18 299 

70 
4 

66 



Florence city, Florence County 



Tract 7 (pt.) Tract 8 (pt.) Tract 9 (pt.) Tract 10 (pt.) Tract 11 (pt.) 



875 



4 
44 
47 
354 
166 
94 
107 
59 



7 

188 

292 

288 

92 



850 
875 
849 

38 
8 

30 



353 

61 

162 

221 



499 

225 

126 

25 

.6 



277 

4 

15 

39 

82 

137 

598 

207 

186 

91 

87 

27 



277 

281 
137 

11 
54 
171 

837 

767 

70 

38 

30 



21 915 
10 718 

452 
69 

383 



1 666 



37 
33 
710 
299 
259 
179 
149 



147 
406 
890 
208 
15 



1 662 

1 642 

1 612 

10 

5 

5 



403 
123 
668 
402 
70 



581 
533 
337 
215 
1.2 



958 

14 

84 

67 

399 

394 

708 

197 

248 

99 

102 

62 



258 

410 

342 

5 

48 

165 

1 656 

1 503 
153 

10 
10 



24 931 

13 115 

636 

231 

405 



1 088 



14 
20 
90 
185 
218 
288 
155 
118 



27 
165 
424 
410 

53 
9 



1 066 

1 049 

1 027 

29 

22 

7 



199 

97 

267 

470 

55 



382 
414 
210 
82 
1.0 



511 

40 

46 

168 

257 

577 

124 

192 

119 

75 

67 



232 

358 

211 
22 
71 

156 

1 059 

936 

123 

29 

29 



21 801 

11 397 

455 

122 

333 



184 



7 
27 

21 

37 
29 
28 
35 



14 
28 
107 
27 



177 
184 
184 

7 



99 

5 

59 

13 

8 



100 
40 
44 



25 

16 
9 

159 

67 
84 



55 

26 
18 



26 

177 

166 
11 

7 
7 



14 583 
18 277 

57 
9 

48 



344 



27 

249 
68 



336 
344 
336 



159 
11 
86 
88 



64 
204 

68 

8 

1.1 



86 

11 
34 

15 

26 

258 

107 

132 

19 



344 

320 

24 



26 778 

19 049 

87 

87 



Remainder of Florence County 



Tract 2.01 
(pt.) 



Tract 3 (pt.) 



123 



29 
23 
45 
22 
4 



19 
41 
63 



123 
105 
69 



11 

108 

4 



7 

58 
54 

4 
1.4 



89 

15 

37 

18 

11 

8 

34 

19 

8 

7 



123 

114 

9 



24 484 

18 544 

16 

9 

7 



602 



15 

41 

300 

208 

21 

15 

2 



7 

79 

479 

32 

5 



602 

483 

100 

4 



34 
17 
454 
70 
16 
11 



70 
176 
211 
145 

1.8 



496 

27 
115 
116 
171 

67 
106 

43 

35 
9 

19 



39 

61 

54 



12 

598 

574 

24 

4 



32 994 

26 337 

62 

40 

22 



108 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 36. Selected Structural Characteristics of Housing Units With a Black Householder: 1990 -Con. 

[Threshold is 400 persons. Dota based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 



Tract 5 (pt.) 



Tract 7 (pt.) 



Tract 9 (pt.) 



Tract 15.01 

(pt.) Tract 15.02 



Tract 16.01 
(pt.) 



Tract 16.02 



Tract 17 



Occupied housing units 

YEAR STRUCTURE BUILT 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1960 to 1969 

1950 to 1959 

1940 to 1949 

1939 or earlier 

BEDROOMS 

No bedroom 

1 bedroom 

2 bedrooms 

3 bedrooms 

4 bedrooms 

5 or more bedrooms 

SELECTED STRUCTURAL CHARACTERISTICS 

Complete kitchen facilities 

Source of water, public system or private company 

Sewage disposal, public sewer 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Renter-occupied housing units 

HOUSE HEATING FUEL 

Utility gas 

Bottled, tank, or LP gas 

Electricity 

Fuel oil, kerosene, etc. 

All other fuels 

No fuel used 

VEHICLES AVAILABLE 

None 

1 

2 

3 or more 

Vehicles per household 

YEAR HOUSEHOLDER MOVED INTO UNIT 

Owner-occupied housing units 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1969 or earlier 

Renter-occupied housing units 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1969 or earlier 

SELECTED CHARACTERISTICS 

No telephone in unit 

Householder 65 years and over 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

No telephone in unit 

No vehicle available 

Complete plumbing facilities 

1 .00 or less persons per room 

1.01 or more persons per room 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

1 .00 or less persons per room 

1.01 or more persons per room 

Mean household income in 1989: 

Owner-occupied housing units (dollars) 

Renter-occupied housing units (dollars) 

Household income in 1989 below poverty level 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Renter-occupied housing units 



404 



293 



409 



227 



628 



410 



350 



366 



363 



- 


8 


18 


10 


_ 


11 


_ 


15 


_ 


54 


58 


30 


41 


53 


58 


22 


48 


38 


40 


41 


34 


16 


110 


65 


74 


29 


46 


200 


107 


171 


12 


294 


140 


180 


130 


135 


93 


65 


70 


81 


90 


57 


26 


79 


59 


10 


7 


75 


51 


14 


45 


30 


33 


23 


- 


5 


5 


- 


57 


14 


- 


24 


32 


7 


2 


6 


16 


10 


20 


18 


8 


30 




6 






9 










16 


9 


12 


5 


24 


- 


23 


_ 


19 


124 


100 


158 


93 


170 


87 


101 


88 


68 


238 


178 


192 


116 


328 


262 


209 


209 


236 


19 


- 


47 


13 


92 


55 


17 


69 


34 


7 








5 


6 


— 


— 


6 


404 


288 


403 


217 


624 


393 


344 


366 


341 


345 


215 


175 


133 


273 


97 


306 


26 




152 


129 


153 


98 


59 


15 


306 


26 


_ 


11 


4 


13 


10 


33 


7 


6 




22 


- 


- 


6 


- 


5 


7 


6 


_ 


8 


11 


4 


7 


10 


28 


" 


— 


_ 


14 




13 


63 


33 


15 


6 


16 






10 


8 


62 


49 


46 


30 


8 


55 


65 


354 


201 


115 


77 


281 


226 


265 


141 


122 


26 


64 


143 


46 


208 


83 


35 


107 


135 


9 


7 


26 


22 


78 


65 


26 


63 


41 


5 


















94 


38 


99 


88 


61 


78 


20 


70 


61 


136 


137 


176 


95 


226 


105 


149 


127 


146 


128 


95 


71 


24 


176 


107 


114 


105 


94 


46 


23 


63 


20 


165 


120 


67 


64 


62 


1.4 


1.4 


1.3 


.9 


1.7 


1.7 


1.7 


1.4 


1.5 


229 


162 


271 


105 


498 


334 


192 


296 


271 


44 


- 


26 


6 


- 


28 


31 


15 


6 


80 


105 


37 


7 


79 


48 


60 


58 


93 


45 


14 


17 


- 


87 


60 


57 


36 


47 


43 


31 


85 


34 


232 


105 


36 


90 


71 


17 


12 


106 


58 


100 


93 


8 


97 


54 


175 


131 


138 


122 


130 


76 


158 


70 


92 


125 


87 


59 


29 


25 


13 


80 


7 


20 


15 


30 


22 


40 


53 


33 


66 


25 


7 


15 


5 


4 


17 


12 


7 


12 


14 


55 


9 


7 


34 


15 


29 


23 


_ 


24 


10 


11 


2 


19 


21 


11 


~ 


— 


- 




90 


56 


40 


38 


66 


38 


27 


57 


93 


24 


3 


105 


64 


115 


138 


27 


121 


97 


13 


- 


84 


44 


93 


124 


27 


109 


71 


11 


- 


6 


- 


11 


7 


_ 






- 


- 


4 


6 


17 


11 


_ 


22 


14 


6 


1 


44 


22 


25 


72 


- 


44 


29 


393 


289 


396 


217 


595 


403 


344 


366 


341 


329 


228 


348 


200 


530 


373 


255 


338 


328 


64 


61 


48 


17 


65 


30 


89 


28 


13 


11 


4 


13 


10 


33 


7 


6 




22 


11 


4 


13 


5 


33 


7 


6 


- 


22 


- 


— 


— 


5 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


31 047 


29 761 


26 483 


24 267 


27 003 


24 284 


28 342 


21 985 


21 923 


14 222 


16 313 


17 038 


9 372 


13 049 


15 469 


20 170 


24 733 


11 745 


92 


78 


127 


98 


167 


126 


62 


150 


119 


14 


9 


80 


19 


93 


94 


4 


113 


76 


78 


69 


47 


79 


74 


32 


58 


37 


43 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 109 



Table 36. Selected Structural Characteristics of Housing Units With a Black Householder: 1990 -Con. 

[Threshold is 400 persons. Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 18 



Tract 19 



Tract 20 



Tract 22.01 



Tract 22.02 



Tract 23 



Tract 24.' 



Tract 25 



Tract 26 



Occupied housing units 

YEAR STRUCTURE BUILT 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1960 to 1969 

1950 to 1959 

1940 to 1949 

1939 or eorlier 

BEDROOMS 

No bedroom 

1 bedroom 

2 bedrooms 

3 bedrooms 

4 bedrooms 

5 or more bedrooms 

SELECTED STRUCTURAL CHARACTERISTICS 

Complete kitchen facilities 

Source of water, public system or private company 

Sewage disposal, public sewer 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Renter-occupied housing units 

HOUSE HEATING FUEL 

Utility gas 

Bottled, tonk, or LP gas 

Electricity 

Fuel oil, kerosene, etc. 

All other fuels 

No fuel used 

VEHICLES AVAILABLE 

None 

1 

2 

3 or more 

Vehicles per household 

YEAR HOUSEHOLDER MOVED INTO UNIT 

Owner-occupied housing units 

1989 to Morch 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1969 or earlier 

Renter-occupied housing units 

1989 to March 1990 

1985 to 1988 

1980 to 1984 

1970 to 1979 

1969 or earlier 

SELECTED CHARACTERISTICS 

No telephone in unit 

Householder 65 years and over 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

No telephone in unit 

No vehicle available 

Complete plumbing facilities 

1.00 or less persons per room 

1.01 or more persons per room 

Lacking complete plumbing facilities 

1 .00 or less persons per room 

1 .01 or more persons per room 

Mean household income in 1989: 

Owner-occupied housing units (dollars) 

Renter-occupied housing units (dollars) 

Household income in 1989 below poverty level 

Owner-occupied housing units 

Renter-occupied housing units 



359 



106 



501 



126 



415 



165 



1 301 



456 



166 



369 



142 



334 



121 



332 



654 



37 


23 


25 


36 


19 


5 


16 


_ 


13 


60 


46 


39 


179 


30 


15 


51 


17 


68 


26 


56 


60 


147 


109 


14 


18 


53 


64 


75 


176 


106 


381 


127 


75 


109 


98 


172 


68 


100 


55 


189 


39 


11 


39 


67 


146 


54 


48 


63 


261 


34 


26 


57 


46 


97 


23 


20 


32 


64 


20 


- 


34 


37 


56 


16 


32 


35 


44 


78 


20 


10 


14 


38 






3 




2 








3 


11 


45 


30 


102 


19 


3 


- 


15 


47 


110 


151 


138 


345 


201 


23 


97 


123 


227 


210 


234 


194 


656 


169 


118 


175 


159 


328 


28 


51 


27 


176 


47 


22 


55 


35 


35 




20 


23 


22 


18 




7 


— 


14 


353 


466 


357 


1 293 


456 


155 


310 


278 


644 


219 


237 


145 


1 199 


410 


3 


55 


11 


531 


209 


121 


46 


1 164 


369 


4 


43 


25 


465 


11 


63 


70 


31 


- 


23 


50 


99 


23 


- 


23 


22 


17 


- 


6 


13 


20 


7 


11 


40 


48 


14 




17 


37 


79 


16 


79 


52 


49 


417 


80 




4 


13 


23 


43 


66 


80 


197 


96 


26 


68 


27 


135 


86 


223 


139 


438 


195 


75 


103 


83 


247 


57 


88 


81 


174 


24 


46 


75 


88 


191 


88 


70 


66 


69 


61 


19 


84 


117 


58 


6 


2 




6 






" 


4 


- 


110 


163 


156 


469 


101 


21 


99 


103 


204 


119 


192 


148 


425 


239 


47 


142 


112 


217 


81 


76 


88 


253 


89 


45 


53 


96 


176 


49 


70 


23 


154 


27 


53 


40 


21 


57 


1.3 


1.2 


1.0 


1.1 


1.1 


1.8 


1.1 


1.1 


1.2 


206 


345 


246 


813 


234 


131 


217 


190 


425 


32 


31 


23 


66 


46 


6 


35 


_ 


19 


26 


60 


96 


210 


14 


14 


44 


51 


66 


19 


44 


17 


170 


32 


33 


20 


59 


38 


57 


128 


75 


174 


66 


64 


80 


39 


150 


72 


82 


35 


193 


76 


14 


38 


41 


152 


153 


156 


169 


488 


222 


35 


117 


142 


229 


54 


39 


29 


128 


38 


7 


19 


53 


56 


78 


46 


65 


191 


124 


16 


36 


40 


88 


7 


17 


25 


97 


23 


6 


41 


34 


41 


10 


50 


34 


48 


26 


6 


12 


15 


31 


4 


4 


16 


24 


11 


- 


9 


- 


13 



105 



68 


85 


99 


297 


91 


30 


88 


72 


183 


55 


51 


64 


186 


66 


30 


62 


48 


138 


- 


16 


23 


25 


- 


- 


_ 


18 


12 


5 


16 


31 


62 


17 


- 


16 


23 


8 


27 


52 


67 


163 


25 


- 


54 


14 


70 


348 


438 


345 


1 270 


456 


143 


284 


233 


631 


314 


377 


249 


1 124 


376 


137 


225 


175 


544 


34 


61 


96 


146 


80 


6 


59 


58 


87 


11 


63 


70 


31 


- 


23 


50 


99 


23 


11 


29 


54 


25 


- 


23 


39 


61 


19 


- 


34 


16 


6 


- 


- 


11 


38 


4 


15 243 


22 443 


18 391 


18 347 


19 622 


24 892 


15 427 


19 322 


20 404 


12 060 


10 612 


13 121 


9 304 


7 982 


10 005 


10 429 


12 492 


11 889 


191 


198 


173 


713 


284 


30 


215 


159 


277 


96 


108 


77 


358 


102 


7 


136 


77 


150 


95 


90 


96 


355 


182 


23 


79 


82 


127 



110 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 37. Financial Characteristics of Housing Units With a Black Householder: 1990 

[Threshold is 400 persons. Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text, for definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Florence, SC 
MSA 



Florence County 



Total Florence city 



Totals for split tracts/BNA's in Florence County 



Tract 2.01 



Tract 3 



Tract 5 



Tract 7 



Tract 8 



Tract 9 



Tract 10 



Specified owner-occupied housing units 

SELECTED MONTHLY OWNER COSTS 

With o mortgage 

Less than $300 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 to $599 

$600 to $799 - 

$800 to $999 

$1,000 to $1,499 

$1,500 to $1,999 - 

$2,000 or more 

Median (dollars) 

Not mortgaged 

Less than $100 

$100 to $199 

$200 to $299 

$300 to $399 - 

$400 to $499 .* 

$500 or more 

Median (dollars) 

HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 BY SELECTED 
MONTHLY OWNER COSTS AS A PERCENTAGE OF 
HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 

Less than $20,000 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent — 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$20,000 to $34,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$35,000 to $49,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent . — 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$50,000 or more 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent .. — 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

Specified renter-occupied housing units 

GROSS RENT 

Less than $100 

$100 to $199 

$200 to $299 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 to $599 

$600 to $749 

$750 to $999 

$1,000 or more... 

No cash rent 

Median (dollars) 

HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 BY GROSS RENT AS 
A PERCENTAGE OF HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 

Less than $10,000. - 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$10,000 to $19,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$20,000 to $34,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percept 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$35,000 or more 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 



5 573 

3 191 

577 

745 
641 
528 
507 
149 
36 



448 
382 

275 
328 
593 
129 
41 
16 
170 



2 723 

718 

261 

258 

300 

1 098 

88 

31.3 

1 353 

787 

252 

176 

81 

57 

17.6 

909 

807 

83 

8 

6 

5 

13.3 

588 

559 

17 

12 



10.0- 
5 333 

199 

1 092 

1 178 

1 258 

752 

229 

127 

2 

5 

491 

296 



2 581 
113 
152 
162 
154 

1 575 
425 

50.0+ 

1 482 
248 
322 
276 
193 
319 
124 
27.0 
972 
601 
243 
72 
23 



33 
17.9 
298 
275 

11 



12 
10.9 



5 573 

3 191 

577 
745 
641 
528 
507 
149 
36 



448 
382 

275 
328 
593 
129 
41 
16 
170 



2 723 

718 

261 

258 

300 

1 098 

88 

31.3 

1 353 

787 

252 

176 

81 

57 

17.6 

909 

807 

83 

8 

6 

5 

13.3 

588 

559 

17 

12 



10.0- 
5 333 

199 

1 092 

1 178 

1 258 

752 

229 

127 

2 

5 

491 

296 



2 581 
113 
152 
162 
154 

1 575 
425 

50.0+ 

1 482 
248 
322 
276 
193 
319 
124 
27.0 
972 
601 
243 
72 
23 

33 
17.9 
298 
275 

11 



12 
10.9 



1 881 

959 

141 
210 
222 
177 
162 
31 
16 



461 
922 

70 

514 

261 

48 

19 

10 

176 



937 

265 

119 

103 

107 

326 

17 

28.7 

530 

289 

122 

63 

43 

13 

18.4 

251 

230 

10 

6 



11.7 
163 
163 



10.0- 
2 412 

52 
520 
495 
673 
425 
84 
38 

5 
120 
312 



1 180 

25 

60 

69 

82 

801 

143 

50.0+ 

674 

114 

98 

175 

81 

175 

31 

28.1 

408 

270 

110 

14 

4 

10 
17.8 
150 
139 

11 



10.0- 



26 
22 



575 
4 



225 



17.5 
17 



26.1 



17.5 
34 



34 



378 



50.0+ 
15 



24.7 
12 
12 



17.5 



554 

465 

28 
89 

74 

82 

135 

50 

5 

2 

538 

89 

2 

58 

25 

2 

2 



157 
29 
15 
13 
26 
63 
11 
33.1 

153 
73 
16 
29 
10 
25 

21.1 

149 

102 

45 

2 



17.5 

95 

87 

5 

3 



12.9 
104 



9 
22 

13 

44 



506 



50.0+ 
30 



7 
15 

8 

42.7 

38 

30 

2 

6 



18.2 
24 
24 



13.1 



78 

78 

7 

30 
29 
12 



508 



19 

44.2 
38 

7 
25 



22.4 
14 
14 



14.4 
7 
7 



12.5 
126 



31 
42 
15 
15 



9 
420 



44 
6 



31 

7 

50.0+ 

41 

8 

7 
24 

2 

36.4 

33 

16 

9 



20.3 



10.0- 



422 

146 

29 

39 

51 

9 

15 



408 
276 

32 

135 

87 

11 

6 

5 

175 



234 

97 

28 

25 

5 

73 

6 

23.0 

100 

84 

6 

10 



13.3 

34 

31 

3 



10.0- 
54 
51 



10.0- 
723 

6 
262 
185 
168 
42 
13 
16 

5 

26 

261 



416 

6 

7 

21 

78 

283 

21 

47.1 

169 

40 

32 

22 

20 

43 

12 

26.5 

104 

86 

18 



13.9 

34 

28 

6 



10.0- 



909 

493 

82 

141 
121 
60 

61 

12 
10 
6 

420 
416 

34 

238 

106 

25 

13 

170 



454 

105 

63 

49 

54 

172 

11 

30.4 

212 

112 

55 

21 

19 

5 

19.2 

135 
123 

7 



12.0 
108 
102 



10.0- 
708 

5 
109 
183 
221 
102 
20 

5 



63 

316 



354 

25 
20 

245 

64 

50.0+ 

193 

14 

19 

76 

13 

62 

9 

28.9 

120 

88 

22 



10 

16.3 

41 

41 



10.5 



567 

221 

24 
50 

51 
41 
42 
13 



476 
346 

46 
179 

88 

18 
4 

11 
172 



324 
114 
38 
39 
29 
104 

26.3 
136 
74 
38 

10 

14 

18.6 
72 
72 



11.2 
35 
35 



10.0- 
687 

39 
159 
172 
171 
95 
14 
6 



31 
266 



363 
26 
20 
36 
19 

210 

52 

50.0+ 

209 
52 
36 
29 
39 
43 
10 

27.0 

100 
76 
24 



16.7 
15 
15 



10.0- 



25 
16 



494 
9 



125 



18 
9 



32.5 
7 



22.5 



159 



34 
73 
35 
13 

4 



366 



55 



55 

50.0+ 
41 

15 
15 
6 
5 

26.8 
39 
19 
16 



20.2 
24 
24 



16.3 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 111 



Table 37. Financial Characteristics of Housing Units With a Black Householder: 1990 -Con. 

[Threshold is 400 persons. Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Totals for split tracts/BNA's in Florence County- 
Con. 



Tract 1 1 



11 


Tract 15.01 


Tract 16.01 


86 


287 


124 


34 


116 


100 


14 


34 


- 


- 


15 


- 


6 


43 


35 


- 


4 


28 


14 


20 


37 



Florence city, Florence County 



Tract 7 (pt.) Tract 8 (pt.) Tract 9 (pt.) Tract 10 (pt.) Tract 11 (pt.) 



Remainder of Florence County 



Tract 2.01 

(pt.) Tract 3 (pt.) 



Specified owner-occupied housing units 

SELECTED MONTHLY OWNER COSTS 

With a mortgage 

Less than $300 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 to $599 

$600 to $799 

$800 to $999 

$1,000 to $1,499 

$1,500 to $1,999 

$2,000 or more.. 

Median (dollars) 

Not mortgaged 

Less than $100 

$100 to $199 

$200 to $299 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 or more 

Median (dollars) 

HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 BY SELECTED 
MONTHLY OWNER COSTS AS A PERCENTAGE OF 
HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 

Less than $20,000 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$20,000 to $34,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$35,000 to $49,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$50,000 or more 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

Specified renter-occupied housing units 

GROSS RENT 

Less than $100 

$100 to $199 

$200 to $299 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 to $599 

$600 to $749 

$750 to $999 

$1,000 or more 

No cash rent 

Median (dollars) 

HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 BY GROSS RENT AS 
A PERCENTAGE OF HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 

Less than $10,000 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$10,000 to $19,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Medion 

$20,000 to $34,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$35,000 or more 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median.. 



475 
52 



52 



250 



35 
15 



6 

14 

32.1 
25 
11 



30.5 
26 
26 



10.0- 



242 

9 

16 

30 

36 

145 

6 



417 



72 



58 

6 

50.0+ 

69 
8 

12 
7 

13 

29 

32.9 

82 
43 
31 



19.7 

19 
19 



10.0- 



451 
171 

6 

103 

46 

16 



180 



77 
30 
10 

11 
26 

24.2 
99 
72 

27 



10.0- 
71 
71 



10.0- 
130 



21 
24 
56 

7 
7 



15 
307 



58 



11 
4 
21 
22 
37.5 
45 

38 



23.0 

27 

12 

8 

7 



20.9 



557 
24 

10 



163 



27.2 

50 

8 

9 

19 

14 



27.1 
42 
29 

13 



0.8 


17.1 


22.5 


11.5 


11.5 


40 


5 


21 


95 


30 


40 


5 


21 


95 


30 



12.5 
181 



407 



24.6 
64 



34 

14 

32.4 
38 
26 

12 



17.1 
28 
28 



17.5 



249 

73 

16 
14 
27 
5 
11 



415 
176 

12 

94 

50 

9 

6 

5 

182 



135 
48 
17 
20 

5 
39 

6 

24.9 

90 

74 

6 

10 



13.1 
3 



11.0 
585 

6 

248 

120 

122 

33 

13 

12 

5 

26 

238 



373 

6 

7 

18 

64 

257 

21 

47.2 

143 

40 

28 

13 

20 

30 

12 

24.6 

35 

29 

6 



15.2 

34 

28 

6 



10.0- 



856 

457 

82 

128 
116 

55 
54 
12 
10 



417 
399 

27 
238 
96 
25 
13 

169 



421 
98 
63 
44 
54 

151 

11 

30.0 

212 

112 

55 

21 

19 

5 

19.2 
128 
116 

7 



10.0- 
708 

5 
109 
183 
221 
102 
20 

5 



63 

316 



354 

25 
20 

245 

64 

50.0+ 

193 

14 

19 

76 

13 

62 

9 

28.9 

120 



22 



10 

16.3 

41 

41 



10.5 



475 

215 

24 
44 
51 
41 
42 
13 



481 
260 

31 

147 

63 

14 

5 
168 



272 
87 
34 
39 
29 
83 

26.9 

116 

60 

38 

10 



19.3 
57 
57 



10.0 
565 

32 
139 
113 
162 
68 
14 
6 



31 
272 



290 
19 
20 
31 
11 

157 

52 

50.0+ 

177 
52 
24 
29 
29 
33 
10 
26.3 
83 
68 
15 



15.9 
15 
15 



10.0- 



25 
16 



494 
9 



125 



18 
9 



32.5 
7 



22.5 



159 



34 
73 
35 

13 
4 



366 



55 



55 

50.0+ 
41 

15 
15 
6 
5 

26.8 

39 
19 
16 



20.2 
24 
24 



16.3 



86 



475 
52 



52 



250 



6 
14 

32.1 
25 

11 



30.5 
26 
26 



10.0- 



242 

9 

16 

30 

36 

145 

6 



417 



58 

6 

50.0+ 

69 
8 

12 
7 

13 

29 

32.9 

82 
43 
31 



19.7 
19 

19 



10.0- 



20 



575 
4 



225 



17.5 
11 



24.6 



17.5 
34 



34 



378 



50.0+ 
15 



24.7 

12 
12 



17.5 



381 

23 

75 

61 

45 

120 

50 

5 

2 

548 

63 

2 

32 

25 

2 

2 

196 



130 
21 
10 
13 
26 
49 
11 
33.0 
99 
41 
10 
13 
10 
25 

24.2 
127 
80 

45 
2 



18.2 

88 

80 

5 

3 



13.3 
97 



9 
22 
13 
37 

8 



501 



50.0+ 
23 



40.6 

38 

30 

2 

6 



18.2 
24 
24 



13.1 



112 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 37. Financial Characteristics of Housing Units With a Black Householder: 1990— Con. 

[Threshold is 400 persons. Data based on sample and subject to sompling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 4 



Tract 5 (pt.) 



Tract 7 (pt.) 



Tract 9 (pt.) 



Tract 15.01 

(pt.) Troct 15.02 



Tract 16.01 
(pt.) 



Tract 16.02 



Tract 17 



Specified owner-occupied housing units 

SELECTED MONTHLY OWNER COSTS 

With a mortgage 

Less than $300 

$300 to $399 - 

$400 to $499 

$500 to $599 

$600 to $799 - 

$800 to $999 

$1,000 to $1,499 

$1,500 to $1,999 - 

$2,000 or more — 

Median (dollars) 

Not mortgaged 

Less than $100 — 

$100 to $199 

$200 to $299 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 — 

$500 or more 

Median (dollars) 

HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 BY SELECTED 
MONTHLY OWNER COSTS AS A PERCENTAGE OF 
HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 

Less than $20,000 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent — 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$20,000 to $34,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$35,000 to $49,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$50,000 or more 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

Specified renter-occupied housing units 

GROSS RENT 

Less than $100 

$100 to $199 

$200 to $299 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 to $599 - 

$600 to $749 — 

$750 to $999 

$1,000 or more 

No cash rent 

Median (dollars) 

HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 BY GROSS RENT AS 
A PERCENTAGE OF HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 

Less than $10,000 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$10,000 to $19,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$20,000 to $34,999 

Less thon 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$35,000 or more 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 



142 
127 



25 
7 



557 
15 



175 



20 



20 

50.0+ 

65 

22 

6 

24 
6 
7 

25.9 

39 
39 



17.0 
18 
18 



12.5 
175 

11 
9 
30 
85 
10 
10 
12 



323 



9 

40 

15 

50.0+ 

54 

24 
9 



26.7 
33 

18 
5 
5 
5 



19.2 
13 
13 



10.0- 



78 

78 

7 

30 
29 
12 



508 



19 



19 

44.2 

38 

7 

25 



22.4 
14 
14 



14.4 

7 
7 



12.5 
126 



8 
31 
42 
15 
15 



9 
420 



44 
6 



31 

7 

50.0+ 

41 

8 

7 
24 

2 

36.4 

33 

16 

9 

8 



20.3 



10.0- 



173 

73 

13 
25 
24 

4 
4 



395 
100 

20 

41 

37 

2 



147 



99 

49 
11 
5 

34 

20.2 

10 
10 



16.4 
31 
31 



10.0- 
33 
30 



10.0- 
138 



14 

65 

46 

9 



287 



43 



3 

14 
26 

46.4 
26 

4 
9 

13 

35.0 

69 
57 
12 



13.5 



92 
6 

6 



375 
86 

15 

32 

25 

4 

4 

6 

189 



52 
27 
4 



21 

19.6 
20 

14 



16.7 

15 
15 



10.3 
5 
5 



10.0- 
122 

7 
20 
59 

9 
27 



258 



73 
7 



50.0+ 
32 



12 



10 
10 



32.0 
17 



20.3 



287 

116 

34 
15 
43 
4 
20 



451 
171 

6 

103 

46 

16 



180 



77 
30 
10 

11 
26 

24.2 
99 
72 

27 



10.0- 
71 
71 



10.8 
40 
40 



10.0- 
130 



21 
24 
56 

7 
7 



15 
307 



58 



11 
4 
21 
22 
37.5 
45 

38 



23.0 

27 

12 

8 

7 



20.9 



184 

123 

20 
20 
20 

24 

31 



504 

61 

4 

48 

9 



146 



99 

17 

II 
67 
4 
44.1 
9 
9 



17.5 
53 
53 



12.3 
23 
23 



10.9 
59 



14 
31 



312 



50.0+ 
25 



23.2 

7 
7 



17.5 
6 
6 



12.5 



124 
100 



35 

28 
37 



557 
24 

10 



163 



27 

10 



27.2 

50 

8 

9 

19 

14 



27.1 
42 
29 

13 



17.1 
5 
5 



12.5 
158 



28 
16 

14 
58 
42 



415 



28 
28 



22.5 
64 



34 
14 

32.4 
38 
26 

12 



17.1 
28 
28 



17.5 



181 

107 

30 

15 
19 
21 
18 



472 
74 

16 
50 

8 



138 



100 
28 

11 
13 
10 
38 

29.2 

37 
26 

4 

7 



12.3 
25 
25 



16.9 
19 
19 



10.0- 
65 



27 

5 

7 
10 



16 
270 



25 



18 

7 

50.0+ 

12 
5 



2 

25.0 
14 
14 



15.0 
14 

7 



7 
10.0- 



110 

64 

17 
26 

15 
6 



342 
46 

15 
17 
5 



136 



53 

11 
9 

5 
28 

41.2 
5 
5 



12.5 

41 
41 



12.4 
11 
11 



10.0- 
80 



14 
12 
18 



10 



26 

352 



35 



24 

4 

50.0+ 

37 

5 
10 



22 

26.3 



22.5 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



FLORENCE, SC MSA 113 



Table 37 Financial Characteristics of Housing Units With a Black Householder: 1990 -Con. 

[Threshold is 400 persons. Data based on sample and subject to sampling variability, see text. For definitions of terms and meonings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Remainder of Florence County— Con. 



Tract 18 



Tract 19 



Tract 20 



Tract 22.01 



Tract 22.02 



23 


Tract 24.98 


81 


100 


60 


59 


20 


51 


14 


3 


5 


2 


8 


3 


13 


- 



Tract 25 



Tract 26 



Specified owner-occupied housing units 

SELECTED MONTHLY OWNER COSTS 

With a mortgage 

Less than $300 — 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 to $599 

$600 to $799 

$800 to $999 

$1,000 to $1,499 

$1,500 to $1,999 

$2,000 or more — 

Median (dollars) 

Not mortgaged 

Less than $100 

$100 to $199 

$200 to $299 — 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 or more 

Median (dollars) 

HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 BY SELECTED 
MONTHLY OWNER COSTS AS A PERCENTAGE OF 
HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 

Less than $20,000 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$20,000 to $34,999 . 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$35,000 to $49,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$50,000 or more 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

Specified renter-occupied housing units 

GROSS RENT 

Less than $100 

$100 to $199 

$200 to $299 

$300 to $399 

$400 to $499 

$500 to $599 

$600 to $749 

$750 to $999 

$1,000 or more 

No cash rent 

Median (dollars) 

HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 BY GROSS RENT AS 
A PERCENTAGE OF HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 

Less than $10,000 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$10,000 to $19,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$20,000 to $34,999 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 

$35,000 or more 

Less than 20 percent 

20 to 24 percent 

25 to 29 percent 

30 to 34 percent 

35 percent or more 

Not computed 

Median 



122 

58 

24 
19 
10 
3 
2 



356 
64 

16 

33 

9 

6 



144 



86 

23 

6 

8 

5 

29 

15 

29.1 

26 

17 

9 



17.1 
6 
4 
2 



10.0- 
4 
4 



10.0- 
132 

7 
23 
45 
18 

4 



35 
246 



82 
5 



38 

34 

50.0+ 

32 

15 
12 

2 
3 

20.4 



11.7 
10 
7 



3 
10.0- 



178 

121 

25 
36 

43 
17 



398 
57 

15 
40 



160 



10 
7 
4 

39 

43.3 

46 
39 

7 



13.8 
38 
38 



10.7 
26 
26 



10.0- 
135 

17 

32 

38 

7 

2 



39 
173 



86 

25 

2 



18 

33 

23.8 

30 

6 
18 

2 



4 
21.9 

12 
10 
2 



13.0 
7 
5 



2 

10.0- 



76 

38 

4 

21 

8 

5 



373 
38 

3 

14 
21 



207 



48 

24 

2 



12 
2 
19.3 
18 
15 



13.8 
10 
10 



12.5 



135 

7 
33 
36 
18 

2 



39 

220 



58 



5 

34 

19 

49.6 

48 

8 

9 

7 



24 

22.2 

25 

25 



10.0- 
4 
4 



10.0- 



630 

327 

95 

134 
45 
42 



361 
303 

52 

169 
67 

15 



154 



415 

114 
32 
51 
45 

159 

14 

30.4 

136 

94 

35 

7 



14.9 
36 
36 



10.0- 
478 

31 
162 
137 
64 
30 



39 

216 



307 
13 
29 
19 
22 

191 

33 

44.7 

125 
56 
30 
32 
7 



21.1 
46 
24 
16 



6 
18.3 



200 

118 

35 
39 

15 
5 
13 
11 



375 
82 

62 
12 
8 



167 



144 
26 

5 
27 
79 

7 
37.1 

9 

9 



17.5 
29 
29 



11.3 
218 



90 

88 

11 

6 

4 



19 
213 



167 

7 
16 
4 

116 

24 

50.0+ 

32 

13 

7 

4 
6 
2 
21.4 
19 
17 



2 
12.5 



345 
21 

12 

9 

194 



29 

7 



16 



27.3 

44 

31 

8 

5 



17.4 



12.5 
31 

5 

12 
7 
1 



6 
116 



269 
41 

6 

26 

4 

5 



164 



72 
16 
2 
6 

44 

4 

42.7 

18 

18 



13.2 
3 
3 



11 
6 
45.0 
12 
12 



12.5 
2 
2 



12.5 



10.0- 
89 



36 
14 
5 



34 
141 



56 



12 

25 

19 

50.0+ 

27 

4 



14 



9 

26.8 

6 



63 

29 

8 
16 



370 
34 
10 
24 



121 



37 



10 
9 

10 

27.7 

7 

7 



10.0- 
13 



10.0- 
116 



22 
18 



26 



42 

166 



53 

7 



15 

31 

50.0+ 

32 



17 

7 

36.3 

31 

18 

9 



4 
10.0- 



301 

146 

30 
44 
26 
13 
33 



398 
155 

8 

88 

52 

4 

3 

183 



170 
40 
18 

8 

23 
77 

4 

33.7 

76 

54 

11 

3 



13.7 

36 

34 

2 



10.0- 

43 
37 


10.0- 
18 
18 


8 
8 


12.5 
7 

7 


10.0- 
6 
6 


11.5 
19 
19 


6 


— 


— 


— 


— 


_ 



10.0- 
227 

13 

53 

46 

59 

22 

1 

3 

2 

28 
267 



126 

6 

4 
13 

2 

81 

20 

49.2 

54 

7 
11 

8 
10 

5 

13 

26.6 

41 

27 

9 



5 

17.2 

6 

6 



10.0 



114 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



Table 38. Selected Structural Characteristics of Housing Units With an American Indian, Eskimo, or Aleut 
Householder: 1990 

[The above table was omitted because there were no qualifying areas] 



Table 39. Financial Characteristics of Housing Units With American Indian, Eskimo, or Aleut Householder: 1990 

[The above table was omitted because there were no qualifying areas] 



Table 40. Selected Structural Characteristics of Housing Units With an Asian or Pacific Islander Householder: 1990 

[The above table was omitted because there were no qualifying areas] 



Table 41. Financial Characteristics of Housing Units With an Asian or Pacific Islander Householder: 1990 

[The above table was omitted because there were no qualifying areas] 



Table 42. Selected Structural Characteristics of Housing Units With an Hispanic Origin Householder: 1990 

[The above table wos omitted because there were no qualifying areas] 



Table 43. Financial Characteristics of Housing Units With an Hispanic Origin Householder: 1990 

[The above table was omitted because there were no qualifying areas] 



Table 44. Selected Structural Characteristics of Housing Units With a White, Not of Hispanic Origin Householder: 
1990 

[The above table was omitted because there were no qualifying areas] 



Table 45. Financial Characteristics of Housing Units With a White, Not of Hispanic Origin Householder: 1990 

[The above table was omitted because there were no qualifying areas] 

CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS FLORENCE, SC MSA 115 



Table 46. Percent of Persons and Housing Units in Sample: 1990 



[For definitions of terms and meanings of symbols, see text] 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Persons 



i 00-percent Percent in 
count sample 



Housing units 



100-percent Percent in 
count sample 



Census Tract or Block Numbering 
Area 



Persons 



100-percent 
count 



Percent in 
sample 



Housing units 



100-percent 
count 



Percent in 
sample 



Florence, SC MSA 

FLORENCE COUNTY 

Total — — - 

Florence city 

TOTALS FOR SPLIT TRACTS/BNA'S IN FLORENCE 
COUNTY 

Tract 2.01 

Tract 2.02 - 

Tract 3 — — 

Tract 5 

Tract 6 - — - — 

Tract 7 — — - 

Tract 8 — — — 

Tract 9 — — 

Tract 10 — — 

Tract 11 — — 

Tract 12 - 

Tract 13 — 

Tract 14 — - 

Tract 15.01 - 

Tract 16.01 

FLORENCE CITY, FLORENCE COUNTY 

Tract 2.01 (pt.) 

Tract 2.02 (pt.) . 

Tract 3 (pt.) — 

Tract 5 (pt.) — 

Tract 6 (pt.) — 

Tract 7 (pt.) 

Tract 8 (pt.) — 

Tract 9 (pt.) 

Tract 10 (pt.) 

Tract 11 (pt.) 

Tract 12 (pt.) 



114 344 



114 344 
29 813 



2 155 

3 361 

3 738 

4 237 

3 350 

4 775 

5 678 
4 032 

2 226 
4 555 

3 305 

3 558 

4 482 

5 502 
4 131 



137 

23 

396 

9 

1 108 
3 326 
5 443 

3 298 

2 226 

4 555 

3 188 



16.3 



16.3 
14.3 



13.5 
14.1 
22.1 
13.7 
13.2 
15.8 
16.1 
14.6 
13.7 
11.7 

15.6 
13.3 
15.0 
13.2 
12.8 



10.9 
26.) 
13.4 

15.0 
15.5 
16.1 
14.3 
13.7 
11.7 
15.3 



43 209 



16.5 



43 209 


16.5 


11 790 


14.2 


813 


13.8 


1 430 


13.9 


1 341 


22.7 


1 426 


13.4 


1 247 


13.2 


1 577 


15.0 


1 811 


15.4 


1 388 


15.1 


1 112 


14.4 


2 352 


11.6 


1 458 


15.7 


1 551 


13.5 


1 734 


14.8 


1 914 


13.0 


1 503 


12.9 


76 


13.2 


12 


16.7 


121 


14.0 


3 


- 


371 


14.8 


1 021 


15.7 


1 736 


15.3 


1 120 


15.1 


1 112 


14.4 


2 352 


11.6 


1 398 


15.6 



FLORENCE CITY, FLORENCE COUNTY-Con 

Tract 13 (pt.) 

Tract 14 (pt.) 

Tract 15.01 (pt.) 

Tract 16.01 (pt.) 

REMAINDER OF FLORENCE COUNTY 

Tract 1 

Tract 2.01 (pt.) 

Troct 2.02 (pt.) 

Tract 3 (pt.) 

Tract 4 

Tract 5 (pt.) 



Troct 6 (pt.) ... 
Tract 7 (pt.) ... 
Tract 8 (pt.) ... 
Tract 9 (pt.) ... 
Tract 10 (pt.) .. 
Tract 1 1 (pt.) .. 
Tract 12 (pt.) .. 
Tract 13 (pt.) .. 
Tract 14 (pt.) ... 
Tract 15.01 (pt.) 

Tract 15.02 

Tract 16.01 (pt.) 

Tract 16.02 

Tract 17 

Tract 18 

Tract 19 

Tract 20 

Tract 22.01 

Tract 22.02 

Tract 23 

Tract 24.98 

Tract 25 

Tract 26 , 



2 158 

3 715 

231 

4 341 

2 018 

3 338 

3 342 

4 068 
4 228 
2 242 
1 449 

235 
734 



117 
1 400 

767 
5 502 
4 425 
3 900 
3 901 
1 942 



554 
111 
145 
817 
372 
081 
863 
927 
712 



11.7 
14.8 

15.2 

14.4 
13.6 
14.1 
23.1 
11.8 
13.7 
12.3 
16.6 
15.7 
16.2 



23.1 
15.7 
16.0 
13.2 
13.2 
12.7 
15.5 
15.1 
26.1 
21.2 
22.3 
11.1 
15.5 
22.9 
19.4 
14.5 
34.1 



943 
1 420 



105 



1 567 

737 

1 418 

1 220 

1 676 

1 423 

876 

556 

75 

268 



60 

608 
314 
1 914 
1 598 
1 398 
1 401 
713 



406 
262 
483 
117 
347 
184 
359 
059 
380 



12.1 

14.9 

16.2 

14.7 
13.8 
13.9 
23.5 
12.3 
13.4 
12.4 
13.8 
18.7 
15.3 



18.3 
15.6 
14.3 
13.0 
13.3 
12.7 
15.2 
15.7 
26.0 
22.2 
24.0 
11.6 
15.9 
22.9 
20.5 
13.5 
36.1 



116 FLORENCE, SC MSA 



CENSUS TRACTS AND BLOCK NUMBERING AREAS 



APPENDIX A. 
Area Classifications 



CONTENTS 

Alaska Native Regional Corporation (ANRC) (See American 

Indian and Alaska Native Area) 
Alaska Native Village (ANV) (See American Indian and Alaska 

Native Area) 
Alaska Native Village Statistical Area (See American Indian 

and Alaska Native Area) 

American Indian and Alaska Native Area A-1 

American Indian Reservation (See American Indian and Alaska 

Native Area, see County Subdivision) 
American Indian Reservation and Trust Land (See American 

Indian and Alaska Native Area) 
American Samoa (See Outlying Areas of the United States, see 

State) 

Area Measurement A-3 

Assessment District (See County Subdivision) 

Block A-3 

Block Group (BG) A-4 

Block Numbering Area (BNA) (See Census Tract and Block 

Numbering Area) 
Borough (See County Subdivision, see Place) 
Borough and Census Area (Alaska) (See County) 

Boundary Changes A-4 

Census Area (Alaska) (See County) 

Census Block (See Block) 

Census Code (See Geographic Code) 

Census County Division (CCD) (See County Subdivision) 

Census Designated Place (CDP) (See Place) 

Census Division (See Census Region and Census Division) 

Census Geographic Code (See Geographic Code) 

Census Region and Census Division A-4 

Census Subarea (Alaska) (See County Subdivision) 

Census Tract and Block Numbering Area A-5 

Central City (See Metropolitan Area) 
Central Place (See Urbanized Area) 
City (See Place) 

Congressional District (CD) A-6 

Consolidated City (See Place) 

Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area (CMSA) (See 
Metropolitan Area) 

County A-6 

County Subdivision A-6 

Crews Of Vessels (See Area Measurement, see Block, see 

Census Tract and Block Numbering Area) 
Division (See Census Region and Division, see County Subdivision) 
Election District (See County Subdivision, see Voting District) 
Extended City (See Urban and Rural) 
Farm (See Urban and Rural) 
Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) Code 

(See Geographic Code) 
Geographic Block Group (See Block Group) 
Geographic Code A-7 

Geographic Presentation A-7 

Gore (See County Subdivision) 
Grant (See County Subdivision) 

Guam (See Outlying Areas of the United States, see State) 
Hierarchical Presentation (See Geographic Presentation) 
Historic Areas Of Oklahoma (See American Indian and 
Alaska Native Area, Tribal Jurisdiction Statistical Area) 

Historical Counts A-8 

Incorporated Place (See Place) 

Independent City (See County) 

Internal Point A-8 

Inventory Presentation (See Geographic Presentation) 
Land Area (See Area Measurement) 

AREA CLASSIFICATIONS 



Latitude (See Internal Point) 

Longitude (See Internal Point) 

Magisterial District (See County Subdivision) 

Metropolitan Area (MA) A-8 

Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) (See Metropolitan Area) 
Minor Civil Division (MCD) (See County Subdivision) 
Northern Mariana Islands (See Outlying Areas of the United 

States, see State) 
Outlying Areas of the United States A-9 

Palau (See Outlying Areas of the United States, see State) 

Parish (Louisiana) (See County) 

Parish Governing Authority District (See County Subdivision) 

Place A-9 

Plantation (See County Subdivision) 

Population or Housing Unit Density A-1 

Precinct (See County Subdivision, see Voting District) 
Primary Metropolitan Statistical Area (PMSA) (See 

Metropolitan Area) 
Puerto RiCO (See Outlying Areas of the United States, see State) 
Purchase (See County Subdivision) 

Region (See Census Region and Census Division) 
Rural (See Urban and Rural) 

Selected States (See County Subdivision, see State) f ^ 

State A-11 

Supervisors' District (See County Subdivision) 
Tabulation Block Group (See Block Group) 

TIGER A-11 

Town (See County Subdivision, see Place) 

Township (See County Subdivision) 

Tract (See Census Tract and Block Numbering Area) 

Tribal Designated Statistical Area (TDSA) (See American 

Indian and Alaska Native Area) 
Tribal Jurisdiction Statistical Area (TJSA) (See American 

Indian and Alaska Native Area) 
Trust Land (See American Indian and Alaska Native Area) 

UnitedStates A-11 

Unorganized Territory (unorg.) (See County Subdivision) 

Urban and Rural A-1 1 

Urbanized Area (UA) A-12 

Village (See Place) 

Virgin Islands (See Outlying Areas of the United States, see State) 

Voting District (VTD) A-12 

Water Area (See Area Measurement) 

ZIP Code® A-1 3 

These definitions are for all geographic entities and 
concepts that the Census Bureau will include in its stand- 
ard 1990 census data products. Not all entities and con- 
cepts are shown in any one 1 990 census data product. For 
a description of geographic areas included in each data 
product, see appendix F. 

AMERICAN INDIAN AND ALASKA NATIVE AREA 

Alaska Native Regional Corporation (ANRC) 

Alaska Native Regional Corporations (ANRC's) are cor- 
porate entities established under the Alaska Native Claims 
Settlement Act of 1972, Public Law 92-203, as amended 
by Public Law 94-204, to conduct both business and 
nonprofit affairs of Alaska Natives. Alaska is divided into 



A-1 



s- 



12 ANRC's that cover the entire State, except for the 
Annette Islands Reserve. The boundaries of the 1 2 ANRC's 
were established by the Department of the Interior, in 
cooperation with Alaska Natives. Each ANRC was designed 
to include, as far as practicable, Alaska Natives with a 
common heritage and common interests. The ANRC bound- 
aries for the 1990 census were identified by the Bureau of 
Land Management. A 13th region was established for 
Alaska Natives who are not permanent residents and who 
chose not to enroll in one of the 12 ANRC's; no census 
products are prepared for the 13th region. ANRC's were 
first identified for the 1980 census. 

Each ANRC is assigned a two-digit census code ranging 
from 07 through 84. These census codes are assigned in 
alphabetical order of the ANRC's. 

Alaska Native Village (ANV) Statistical Area 

Alaska Native villages (ANV's) constitute tribes, bands, 
clans, groups, villages, communities, or associations in 
Alaska that are recognized pursuant to the Alaska Native 
Claims Settlement Act of 1 972, Public Law 92-203. Because 
ANV's do not have legally designated boundaries, the 
Census Bureau has established Alaska Native village 
statistical areas (ANVSA's) for statistical purposes. For the 
1990 census, the Census Bureau cooperated with officials 
of the nonprofit corporation within each participating Alaska 
Native Regional Corporation (ANRC), as well as other 
knowledgeable officials, to delineate boundaries that encom- 
pass the settled area associated with each ANV. ANVSA's 
are located within ANRC's and do not cross ANRC bound- 
aries. ANVSA's for the 1990 census replace the ANV's 
that the Census Bureau recognized for the 1980 census. 

Each ANVSA is assigned a four-digit census code 
ranging from 6001 through 8989. Each ANVSA also is 
assigned a five-digit FIPS code. Both the census and FIPS 
codes are assigned in alphabetical order of ANVSA's. 

American Indian Reservation and Trust Land 

American Indian Reservation— Federal American Indian 
reservations are areas with boundaries established by 
treaty, statute, and/or executive or court order, and rec- 
ognized by the Federal Government as territory in which 
American Indian tribes have jurisdiction. State reservations 
are lands held in trust by State governments for the use 
and benefit of a given tribe. The reservations and their 
boundaries were identified for the 1990 census by the 
Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), Department of Interior (for 
Federal reservations), and State governments (for State 
reservations). The names of American Indian reservations 
recognized by State governments, but not by the Federal 
Government, are followed by "(State)." Areas composed 
of reservation lands that are administered jointly and/or 
are claimed by two reservations, as identified by the BIA, 
are called "joint areas," and are treated as separate 
American Indian reservations for census purposes. 



Federal reservations may cross State boundaries, and 
Federal and State reservations may cross county, county 
subdivision, and place boundaries. For reservations that 
cross State boundaries, only the portion of the reserva- 
tions in a given State are shown in the data products for 
that State; the entire reservations are shown in data 
products for the United States. 

Each American Indian reservation is assigned a four- 
digit census code ranging from 0001 through 4989. These 
census codes are assigned in alphabetical order of Amer- 
ican Indian reservations nationwide, except that joint areas 
appear at the end of the code range. Each American Indian 
reservation also is assigned a five-digit FIPS code; because 
the FIPS codes are assigned in alphabetical sequence of 
American Indian reservations within each State, the FIPS 
code is different in each State for reservations in more 
than one State. 

Trust Land — Trust lands are property associated with a 
particular American Indian reservation or tribe, held in trust 
by the Federal Government. Trust lands may be held in 
trust either for a tribe (tribal trust land) or for an individual 
member of a tribe (individual trust land). Trust lands 
recognized for the 1990 census comprise all tribal trust 
lands and inhabited individual trust lands located outside 
of a reservation boundary. As with other American Indian 
areas, trust lands may be located in more than one State. 
Only the trust lands in a given State are shown in the data 
products for that State; all trust lands associated with a 
reservation or tribe are shown in data products for the 
United States. The Census Bureau first reported data for 
tribal trust lands for the 1980 census. 

Trust lands are assigned a four-digit census code and a 
five-digit FIPS code, the same as that for the reservation 
with which they are associated. Trust lands not associated 
with a reservation are presented by tribal name, inter- 
spersed alphabetically among the reservations. 

Tribal Designated Statistical Area (TDSA) 

Tribal designated statistical areas (TDSA's) are areas, 
delineated outside Oklahoma by federally- and State- 
recognized tribes without a land base or associated trust 
lands, to provide statistical areas for which the Census 
Bureau tabulates data. TDSA's represent areas generally 
containing the American Indian population over which 
federally-recognized tribes have jurisdiction and areas in 
which State tribes provide benefits and services to their 
members. The names of TDSA's delineated by State- 
recognized tribes are followed by "(State)." The Census 
Bureau did not recognize TDSA's before the 1990 census. 

Each TDSA is assigned a four-digit census code ranging 
from 9001 through 9589. The census codes are assigned 
in alphabetical order of TDSA's nationwide. Each TDSA 
also is assigned a five-digit FIPS code in alphabetical order 
within State. 



A-2 



AREA CLASSIFICATIONS 



Tribal Jurisdiction Statistical Area (TJSA) 

Tribal jurisdiction statistical areas (TJSA's) are areas, 
delineated by federally-recognized tribes in Oklahoma 
without a reservation, for which the Census Bureau tabu- 
lates data. TJSA's represent areas generally containing 
the American Indian population over which one or more 
tribal governments have jurisdiction; if tribal officials delin- 
eated adjacent TJSA's so that they include some duplicate 
territory, the overlap area is called a "joint use area," 
which is treated as a separate TJSA for census purposes. 

TJSA's replace the "Historic Areas of Oklahoma (exclud- 
ing urbanized areas)" shown in 1980 census data prod- 
ucts. The Historic Areas of Oklahoma comprised the 
territory located within reservations that had legally estab- 
lished boundaries from 1900 to 1907; these reservations 
were dissolved during the 2- to 3-year period preceding the 
statehood of Oklahoma in 1907. The Historic Areas of 
Oklahoma (excluding urbanized areas) were identified only 
for the 1980 census. 

Each TJSA is assigned a four-digit census code ranging 
from 5001 through 5989. The census codes are assigned 
in alphabetical order of TJSA's, except that joint areas 
appear at the end of the code range. Each TJSA also is 
assigned a five-digit FIPS code in alphabetical order within 
Oklahoma. 

AREA MEASUREMENT 

Area measurements provide the size, in square kilome- 
ters (also in square miles in printed reports), recorded for 
each geographic entity for which the Census Bureau 
tabulates data in general-purpose data products (except 
crews-of-vessels entities and ZIP Codes). (Square kilome- 
ters may be divided by 2.59 to convert an area measure- 
ment to square miles.) Area was calculated from the 
specific set of boundaries recorded for the entity in the 
Census Bureau's geographic data base (see "TIGER"). 
On machine-readable files, area measurements are shown 
to three decimal places; the decimal point is implied. In 
printed reports and listings, area measurements are shown 
to one decimal. 

The Census Bureau provides measurements for both 
land area and total water area for the 1990 census; the 
water figure includes inland, coastal, Great Lakes, and 
territorial water. (For the 1 980 census, the Census Bureau 
provided area measurements for land and inland water.) 
The Census Bureau will provide measurements for the 
component types of water for the affected entities in a 
separate file. "Inland water" consists of any lake, reser- 
voir, pond, or similar body of water that is recorded in the 
Census Bureau's geographic data base. It also includes 
any river, creek, canal, stream, or similar feature that is 
recorded in that data base as a two-dimensional feature 
(rather than as a single line). The portions of the oceans 
and related large embayments (such as the Chesapeake 
Bay and Puget Sound), the Gulf of Mexico, and the 
Caribbean Sea that belong to the United States and its 
territories are considered to be "coastal" and "territorial" 



waters; the Great Lakes are treated as a separate water 
entity. Rivers and bays that empty into these bodies of 
water are treated as "inland water" from the point beyond 
which they are narrower than one nautical mile across. 
Identification of land and inland, coastal, and territorial 
waters is for statistical purposes, and does not necessarily 
reflect legal definitions thereof. 

By definition, census blocks do not include water within 
their boundaries; therefore, the water area of a block is 
always zero. Land area measurements may disagree with 
the information displayed on census maps and in the 
TIGER file because, for area measurement purposes, 
features identified as "intermittent water" and "glacier" 
are reported as land area. For this reason, it may not be 
possible to derive the land area for an entity by summing 
the land area of its component census blocks. In addition, 
the water area measurement reported for some geo- 
graphic entities includes water that is not included in any 
lower-level geographic entity. Therefore, because water is 
contained only in a higher-level geographic entity, sum- 
ming the water measurements for all the component 
lower-level geographic entities will not yield the water area 
of that higher-level entity. This occurs, for example, where 
water is associated with a county but is not within the legal 
boundary of any minor civil division, or the water is 
associated with a State but is not within the legal boundary 
of any county. Crews-of-vessels entities (see "Census 
Tract and Block Numbering Area" and "Block") do not 
encompass territory and therefore have no area measure- 
ments. ZIP Codes do not have specific boundaries, and 
therefore, also do not have area measurements. 

The accuracy of any area measurement figure is limited 
by the inaccuracy inherent in (1) the location and shape 
of the various boundary features in the data base, and 
(2) rounding affecting the last digit in all operations that 
compute and/or sum the area measurements. 

BLOCK 

Census blocks are small areas bounded on all sides by 
visible features such as streets, roads, streams, and 
railroad tracks, and by invisible boundaries such as city, 
town, township, and county limits, property lines, and short, 
imaginary extensions of streets and roads. 

Tabulation blocks, used in census data products, are in 
most cases the same as collection blocks, used in the 
census enumeration. In some cases, collection blocks 
have been "split" into two or more parts required for data 
tabulations. Tabulation blocks do not cross the boundaries 
of counties, county subdivisions, places, census tracts or 
block numbering areas, American Indian and Alaska Native 
areas, congressional districts, voting districts, urban or 
rural areas, or urbanized areas. The 1990 census is the 
first for which the entire United States and its possessions 
are block-numbered. 

Blocks are numbered uniquely within each census tract 
or BNA. A block is identified by a three-digit number, 
sometimes with a single alphabetical suffix. Block numbers 



AREA CLASSIFICATIONS 



A-3 



with suffixes generally represent collection blocks that 
were "split" in order to identify separate geographic enti- 
ties that divide the original block. For example, when a city 
limit runs through data collection block 101, the data for 
the portion inside the city is tabulated in block 101 A and 
the portion outside, in block 1 01 B. A block number with the 
suffix "Z" represents a "crews-of-vessels" entity for which 
the Census Bureau tabulates data, but that does not 
represent a true geographic area; such a block is shown on 
census maps associated with an anchor symbol and a 
census tract or block numbering area with a .99 suffix. 



BLOCK GROUP (BG) 

Geographic Block Group 

A geographic block group (BG) is a cluster of blocks 
having the same first digit of their three-digit identifying 
numbers within a census tract or block numbering area 
(BNA). For example, BG 3 within a census tract or BNA 
includes all blocks numbered between 301 and 397. In 
most cases, the numbering involves substantially fewer 
than 97 blocks. Geographic BG's never cross census tract 
or BNA boundaries, but may cross the boundaries of 
county subdivisions, places, American Indian and Alaska 
Native areas, urbanized areas, voting districts, and con- 
gressional districts. BG's generally contain between 250 
and 550 housing units, with the ideal size being 400 
housing units. 

Tabulation Block Group 

In the data tabulations, a geographic BG may be split to 
present data for every unique combination of county 
subdivision, place, American Indian and Alaska Native 
area, urbanized area, voting district, urban/rural and con- 
gressional district shown in the data product; for example, 
if BG 3 is partly in a city and partly outside the city, there 
will be separate tabulated records for each portion of BG 3. 
BG's are used in tabulating decennial census data nation- 
wide in the 1990 census, in all block-numbered areas in the 
1980 census, and in Tape Address Register (TAR) areas in 
the 1970 census. For purposes of data presentation, BG's 
are a substitute for the enumeration districts (ED's) used 
for reporting data in many parts of the United States for the 
1970 and 1980 censuses, and in all areas for pre-1970 
censuses. 



BOUNDARY CHANGES 

The boundaries of some counties, county subdivisions, 
American Indian and Alaska Native areas, and many 
incorporated places, changed between those reported for 
the 1980 census and January 1, 1990. Boundary changes 
to legal entities result from: 



1. Annexations to or detachments from legally estab- 
lished governmental units. 

2. Mergers or consolidations of two or more governmen- 
tal units. 

3. Establishment of new governmental units. 

4. Disincorporations or disorganizations of existing gov- 
ernmental units. 

5. Changes in treaties and Executive Orders. 

The historical counts shown for counties, county subdi- 
visions, and places are not updated for such changes, and 
thus reflect the population and housing units in the area as 
delineated at each census. Information on boundary changes 
reported between the 1980 and 1990 censuses for coun- 
ties, county subdivisions, and incorporated places is pre- 
sented in the "User Notes" section of the technical 
documentation of Summary Tape Files 1 and 3, and in the 
1 990 CPH-2, Population and Housing Unit Counts printed 
reports. For information on boundary changes for such 
areas in the decade preceding other decennial censuses, 
see the Number of Inhabitants reports for each census. 
Boundary changes are not reported for some areas, such 
as census designated places and block groups. 

CENSUS REGION AND CENSUS DIVISION 
Census Division 

Census divisions are groupings of States that are sub- 
divisions of the four census regions. There are nine 
divisions, which the Census Bureau adopted in 1910 for 
the presentation of data. The regions, divisions, and their 
constituent States are: 

Northeast Region 

New England Division: 

Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, 
Rhode Island, Connecticut 

Middle Atlantic Division: 

New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania 

Midwest Region 

East North Central Division: 

Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin 

West North Central Division: 

Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, North Dakota, South Dakota, 
Nebraska, Kansas 

South Region 

South Atlantic Division: 

Delaware, Maryland, District of Columbia, Virginia, 
West Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, 
Florida 



A-4 



AREA CLASSIFICATIONS 



East South Central Division: 

Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi 

West South Central Division: 
Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Texas 

West Region 

Mountain Division: 

Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, 
Arizona, Utah, Nevada 

Pacific Division: 

Washington, Oregon, California, Alaska, Hawaii 

Census Region 

Census regions are groupings of States that subdivide 
the United States for the presentation of data. There are 
four regions— Northeast, Midwest, South, and West. Each 
of the four census regions is divided into two or more 
census divisions. Prior to 1984, the Midwest region was 
named the North Central region. From 1910, when census 
regions were established, through the 1 940's, there were 
three regions— North, South, and West. 

CENSUS TRACT AND BLOCK NUMBERING 
AREA 

Block Numbering Area (BNA) 

Block numbering areas (BNA's) are small statistical 
subdivisions of a county for grouping and numbering 
blocks in nonmetropolitan counties where local census 
statistical areas committees have not established census 
tracts. State agencies and the Census Bureau delineated 
BNA's for the 1990 census, using guidelines similar to 
those for the delineation of census tracts. BNA's do not 
cross county boundaries. 

BNA's are identified by a four-digit basic number and 
may have a two-digit suffix; for example, 9901.07. The 
decimal point separating the four-digit basic BNA number 
from the two-digit suffix is shown in printed reports, in 
microfiche, and on census maps; in machine-readable 
files, the decimal point is implied. Many BNA's do not have 
a suffix; in such cases, the suffix field is left blank in all data 
products. BNA numbers range from 9501 through 9989.99, 
and are unique within a county (numbers in the range of 
0001 through 9499.99 denote a census tract). The suffix 
.99 identifies a BNA that was populated entirely by persons 
aboard one or more civilian or military ships. A "crews-of- 
vessels" BNA appears on census maps only as an anchor 
symbol with its BNA number (and block numbers on maps 
showing block numbers); the BNA relates to the ships 
associated with the onshore BNA's having the same 
four-digit basic number. Suffixes in the range .80 through 
.98 usually identify BNA's that either were revised or were 
created during the 1990 census data collection activities. 



Some of these revisions produced BNA's that have extremely 
small land area and may have little or no population or 
housing. For data analysis, such a BNA can be summa- 
rized with an adjacent BNA. 

Census Tract 

Census tracts are small, relatively permanent statistical 
subdivisions of a county. Census tracts are delineated for 
all metropolitan areas (MA's) and other densely populated 
counties by local census statistical areas committees 
following Census Bureau guidelines (more than 3,000 
census tracts have been established in 221 counties 
outside MA's). Six States (California, Connecticut, Dela- 
ware, Hawaii, New Jersey, and Rhode Island) and the 
District of Columbia are covered entirely by census tracts. 
Census tracts usually have between 2,500 and 8,000 
persons and, when first delineated, are designed to be 
homogeneous with respect to population characteristics, 
economic status, and living conditions. Census tracts do 
not cross county boundaries. The spatial size of census 
tracts varies widely depending on the density of settle- 
ment. Census tract boundaries are delineated with the 
intention of being maintained over a long time so that 
statistical comparisons can be made from census to 
census. However, physical changes in street patterns 
caused by highway construction, new development, etc., 
may require occasional revisions; census tracts occasion- 
ally are split due to large population growth, or combined 
as a result of substantial population decline. Census tracts 
are referred to as "tracts" in all 1990 data products. 

Census tracts are identified by a four-digit basic number 
and may have a two-digit suffix; for example, 6059.02. The 
decimal point separating the four-digit basic tract number 
from the two-digit suffix is shown in printed reports, in 
microfiche, and on census maps; in machine-readable 
files, the decimal point is implied. Many census tracts do 
not have a suffix; in such cases, the suffix field is left blank 
in all data products. Leading zeros in a census tract 
number (for example, 002502) are shown only on machine- 
readable files. 

Census tract numbers range from 0001 through 9499.99 
and are unique within a county (numbers in the range of 
9501 through 9989.99 denote a block numbering area). 
The suffix .99 identifies a census tract that was populated 
entirely by persons aboard one or more civilian or military 
ships. A "crews-of-vessels" census tract appears on cen- 
sus maps only as an anchor symbol with its census tract 
number (and block numbers on maps showing block 
numbers). These census tracts relate to the ships associ- 
ated with the onshore census tract having the same 
four-digit basic number. Suffixes in the range .80 through 
.98 usually identify census tracts that either were revised 
or were created during the 1990 census data collection 
activities. Some of these revisions may have resulted in 
census tracts that have extremely small land area and may 
have little or no population or housing. For data analysis, 
such a census tract can be summarized with an adjacent 
census tract. 



AREA CLASSIFICATIONS 



A-5 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT (CD) 

Congressional districts (CD's) are the 435 areas from 
which persons are elected to the U.S. House of Represen- 
tatives. After the apportionment of congressional seats 
among the States, based on census population counts, 
each State is responsible for establishing CD's for the 
purpose of electing representatives. Each CD is to be as 
equal in population to all other CD's in the State as 
practicable, based on the decennial census counts. 

The CD's that were in effect on January 1, 1990 were 
those of the 101st Congress. Data on the 101st Congress 
appear in an early 1990 census data product (Summary 
Tape File 1A). The CD's of the 101st Congress are the 
same as those in effect for the 102nd Congress. CD's of 
the 103rd Congress, reflecting redistricting based on the 
1990 census, are summarized in later 1990 data products 
(STF's 1D and 3D, and 1990 CPH-4, Population and 
Housing Characteristics for Congressional Districts of the 
103rd Congress printed reports). 

COUNTY 

The primary political divisions of most States are termed 
"counties." In Louisiana, these divisions are known as 
"parishes." In Alaska, which has no counties, the county 
equivalents are the organized "boroughs" and the "cen- 
sus areas" that are delineated for statistical purposes by 
the State of Alaska and the Census Bureau. In four States 
(Maryland, Missouri, Nevada, and Virginia), there are one 
or more cities that are independent of any county organi- 
zation and thus constitute primary divisions of their States. 
These cities are known as "independent cities" and are 
treated as equivalent to counties for statistical purposes. 
That part of Yellowstone National Park in Montana is 
treated as a county equivalent. The District of Columbia 
has no primary divisions, and the entire area is considered 
equivalent to a county for statistical purposes. 

Each county and county equivalent is assigned a three- 
digit FIPS code that is unique within State. These codes 
are assigned in alphabetical order of county or county 
equivalent within State, except for the independent cities, 
which follow the listing of counties. 

COUNTY SUBDIVISION 

County subdivisions are the primary subdivisions of 
counties and their equivalents for the reporting of decen- 
nial census data. They include census county divisions, 
census subareas, minor civil divisions, and unorganized 
territories. 

Each county subdivision is assigned a three-digit cen- 
sus code in alphabetical order within county and a five-digit 
FIPS code in alphabetical order within State. 

Census County Division (CCD) 

Census county divisions (CCD's) are subdivisions of a 
county that were delineated by the Census Bureau, in 
cooperation with State officials and local census statistical 



areas committees, for statistical purposes. CCD's were 
established in 21 States where there are no legally estab- 
lished minor civil divisions (MCD's), where the MCD's do 
not have governmental or administrative purposes, where 
the boundaries of the MCD's change frequently, and/or 
where the MCD's are not generally known to the public. 
CCD's have no legal functions, and are not governmental 
units. 

The boundaries of CCD's usually are delineated to 
follow visible features, and in most cases coincide with 
census tract or block numbering area boundaries. The 
name of each CCD is based on a place, county, or 
well-known local name that identifies its location. CCD's 
have been established in the following 21 States: Ala- 
bama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, 
Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Kentucky, Montana, Nevada, New 
Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, 
Texas, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. For the 1980 
census, the county subdivisions recognized for Nevada 
were MCD's. 

Census Subarea (Alaska) 

Census subareas are statistical subdivisions of bor- 
oughs and census areas (county equivalents) in Alaska. 
Census subareas were delineated cooperatively by the 
State of Alaska and the Census Bureau. The census 
subareas, identified first in 1980, replaced the various 
types of subdivisions used in the 1970 census. 

Minor Civil Division (MCD) 

Minor civil divisions (MCD's) are the primary political or 
administrative divisions of a county. MCD's represent 
many different kinds of legal entities with a wide variety of 
governmental and/or administrative functions. MCD's are 
variously designated as American Indian reservations, 
assessment districts, boroughs, election districts, gores, 
grants, magisterial districts, parish governing authority 
districts, plantations, precincts, purchases, supervisors' 
districts, towns, and townships. In some States, all or some 
incorporated places are not located in any MCD and thus 
serve as MCD's in their own right. In other States, incor- 
porated places are subordinate to (part of) the MCD's in 
which they are located, or the pattern is mixed— some 
incorporated places are independent of MCD's and others 
are subordinate to one or more MCD's. 

The Census Bureau recognizes MCD's in the following 
28 States: Arkansas, Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, 
Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mich- 
igan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New 
Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, North 
Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Dakota, 
Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. The Dis- 
trict of Columbia has no primary divisions, and the entire 
area is considered equivalent to an MCD for statistical 
purposes. 



A-6 



AREA CLASSIFICATIONS 



The MCD's in 12 selected States (Connecticut, Maine, 
Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, 
New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Ver- 
mont, and Wisconsin) also serve as general-purpose local 
governments. The Census Bureau presents data for these 
MCD's in all data products in which it provides data for 
places. 

Unorganized Territory (unorg.) 

In nine States (Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, 
Maine, Minnesota, North Carolina, North Dakota, and 
South Dakota), some counties contain territory that is not 
included in an MCD recognized by the Census Bureau. 
Each separate area of unorganized territory in these 
States is recognized as one or more separate county 
subdivisions for census purposes. Each unorganized terri- 
tory is given a descriptive name, followed by the designa- 
tion "unorg." 

GEOGRAPHIC CODE 

Geographic codes are shown primarily on machine- 
readable data products, such as computer tape and com- 
pact disc-read only memory (CD-ROM), but also appear on 
other products such as microfiche; they also are shown on 
some census maps. Codes are identified as "census 
codes" only if there is also a Federal Information Process- 
ing Standards (FIPS) code for the same geographic entity. 
A code that is not identified as either "census" or "FIPS" 
is usually a census code for which there is no FIPS 
equivalent, or for which the Census Bureau does not use 
the FIPS code. The exceptions, which use only the FIPS 
code in census products, are county, congressional dis- 
trict, and metropolitan area (that is, metropolitan statistical 
area, consolidated metropolitan statistical area, and pri- 
mary metropolitan statistical area). 

Census Code 

Census codes are assigned for a variety of geographic 
entities, including American Indian and Alaska Native area, 
census division, census region, county subdivision, place, 
State, urbanized area, and voting district. The structure, 
format, and meaning of census codes appear in the 1990 
census Geographic Identification Code Scheme; in the 
data dictionary portion of the technical documentation for 
summary tape files, CD-ROM's, and microfiche. 



codes used in the census are shown in the 1990 census 
Geographic Identification Code Scheme; in the data dic- 
tionary portion of the technical documentation for sum- 
mary tape files, CD-ROM's, and microfiche. 

The objective of the FIPS codes is to improve the use of 
data resources of the Federal Government and avoid 
unnecessary duplication and incompatibilities in the collec- 
tion, processing, and dissemination of data. More informa- 
tion about FIPS and FIPS code documentation is available 
from the National Technical Information Service, Spring- 
field, VA 22161. 

United States Postal Service (USPS) Code 

United States Postal Service (USPS) codes for States 
are used in ail 1990 data products. The codes are two- 
character alphabetic abbreviations. These codes are the 
same as the FIPS two-character alphabetic abbreviations. 

GEOGRAPHIC PRESENTATION 

Hierarchical Presentation 

A hierarchical geographic presentation shows the geo- 
graphic entities in a superior/subordinate structure in 
census products. This structure is derived from the legal, 
administrative, or areal relationships of the entities. The 
hierarchical structure is depicted in report tables by means 
of indentation, and is explained for machine-readable 
media in the discussion of file structure in the geographic 
coverage portion of the abstract in the technical documen- 
tation. An example of hierarchical presentation is the 
"standard census geographic hierarchy": block, within 
block group, within census tract or block numbering area, 
within place, within county subdivision, within county, within 
State, within division, within region, within the United 
States. Graphically, this is shown as: 

United States 
Region 
Division 
State 
County 
County subdivision 
Place (or part) 
Census tract/block numbering area 
(or part) 

Block group (or part) 
Block 



Federal Information Processing Standards 
(FIPS) Code 

Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) codes 
are assigned for a variety of geographic entities, including 
American Indian and Alaska Native area, congressional 
district, county, county subdivision, metropolitan area, place, 
and State. The structure, format, and meaning of FIPS 



Inventory Presentation 

An inventory presentation of geographic entities is one 
in which all entities of the same type are shown in 
alphabetical or code sequence, without reference to 
their hierarchical relationships. Generally, an inventory 
presentation shows totals for entities that may be split 
in a hierarchical presentation, such as place, census 



AREA CLASSIFICATIONS 



A-7 



tract/block numbering area, or block group. An example of 
a series of inventory presentations is: State, followed by all 
the counties in that State, followed by all the places in that 
State. Graphically, this is shown as: 

State 

County "A" 
County "B" 
County "C" 

Place "X" 
Place "Y" 
Place "Z" 



HISTORICAL COUNTS 

Historical counts for total population and total housing 
units are shown in the 1990 CPH-2, Population and 
Housing Unit Counts report series. As in past censuses, 
the general rule for presenting historical data for States, 
counties, county subdivisions, and places is to show 
historical counts only for single, continually existing enti- 
ties. Stated another way, if an entity existed for both the 
current and preceding censuses, the tables show counts 
for the preceding censuses. Included in this category are 
entities of the same type (county, county subdivision, 
place) even if they had changed their names. Also included 
are entities that merged, but only if the new entity retained 
the name of one of the merged entities. The historical 
counts shown are for each entity as it was bounded at 
each census. 

In cases where an entity was formed since a preceding 
census, such as a newly incorporated place or a newly 
organized township, the symbol three dots "..." is shown 
for earlier censuses. The three-dot symbol also is shown 
for those parts of a place that have extended into an 
additional county or county subdivision through annexation 
or other revision of boundaries since the preceding cen- 
sus. 

In a few cases, changes in the boundaries of county 
subdivisions caused a place to be split into two or more 
parts, or to be split differently than in the preceding census. 
If historical counts for the parts of the place as currently 
split did not appear in a preceding census, "(NA)" is shown 
for the place in each county subdivision; however, the 
historical population and housing unit counts of the place 
appear in tables that show the entire place. For counties, 
county subdivisions, and places formed since January 1 , 
1980, 1980 census population and housing unit counts in 
the 1990 territory are reported in the geographic change 
notes included in the "User Notes" text section of 1990 
CPH-2, Population and Housing Unit Counts, and in the 
technical documentation of Summary Tape Files 1 and 3. 

In some cases, population and housing unit counts for 
individual areas were revised since publication of the 1980 
reports (indicated by the prefix "r"). In a number of tables 
of 1 990 CPH-2, Population and Housing Unit Counts, 1 980 
counts are shown for aggregations of individual areas, 



such as the number, population, and housing unit counts of 
places in size groups, or urban and rural distributions. 
Revisions of population and housing unit counts for indi- 
vidual areas were not applied to the various aggregations. 
Therefore, it may not be possible to determine the individ- 
ual areas in a given aggregation using the historical counts; 
conversely, the sum of the counts shown for individual 
areas may not agree with the aggregation. 

INTERNAL POINT 

An internal point is a set of geographic coordinates 
(latitude and longitude) that is located within a specified 
geographic entity. A single point is identified for each 
entity; for many entities, this point represents the approx- 
imate geographic center of that entity. If the shape of the 
entity caused this point to be located outside the bound- 
aries of the entity, it is relocated from the center so that it 
is within the entity. If the internal point for a block falls in a 
water area, it is relocated to a land area within the block. 
On machine-readable products, internal points are shown 
to six decimal places; the decimal point is implied. 

METROPOLITAN AREA (MA) 

The general concept of a metropolitan area (MA) is one 
of a large population nucleus, together with adjacent 
communities that have a high degree of economic and 
social integration with that nucleus. Some MA's are defined 
around two or more nuclei. 

The MA classification is a statistical standard, devel- 
oped for use by Federal agencies in the production, 
analysis, and publication of data on MA's. The MA's are 
designated and defined by the Federal Office of Manage- 
ment and Budget, following a set of official published 
standards. These standards were developed by the inter- 
agency Federal Executive Committee on Metropolitan 
Areas, with the aim of producing definitions that are as 
consistent as possible for all MA's nationwide. 

Each MA must contain either a place with a minimum 
population of 50,000 or a Census Bureau-defined urban- 
ized area and a total MA population of at least 100,000 
(75,000 in New England). An MA comprises one or more 
central counties. An MA also may include one or more 
outlying counties that have close economic and social 
relationships with the central county. An outlying county 
must have a specified level of commuting to the central 
counties and also must meet certain standards regarding 
metropolitan character, such as population density, urban 
population, and population growth. In New England, MA's 
are composed of cities and towns rather than whole 
counties. 

The territory, population, and housing units in MA's are 
referred to as "metropolitan." The metropolitan category is 
subdivided into "inside central city" and "outside central 
city." The territory, population, and housing units located 
outside MA's are referred to as "nonmetropolitan." The 



A-8 



AREA CLASSIFICATIONS 



metropolitan and nonmetropolitan classification cuts across 
the other hierarchies; for example, there is generally both 
urban and rural territory within both metropolitan and 
nonmetropolitan areas. 

To meet the needs of various users, the standards 
provide for a flexible structure of metropolitan definitions 
that classify an MA either as a metropolitan statistical area 
(MSA) or as a consolidated metropolitan statistical area 
(CMSA) that is divided into primary metropolitan statistical 
areas (PMSA's). Documentation of the MA standards and 
how they are applied is available from the Secretary, 
Federal Executive Committee on Metropolitan Areas, Pop- 
ulation Division, U.S. Bureau of the Census, Washington, 
DC 20233. 

Central City 

In each MSA and CMSA, the largest place and, in some 
cases, additional places are designated as "central cities" 
under the official standards. A few PMSA's do not have 
central cities. The largest central city and, in some cases, 
up to two additional central cities are included in the title of 
the MA; there also are central cities that are not included 
in an MA title. An MA central city does not include any part 
of that city that extends outside the MA boundary. 

Consolidated and Primary Metropolitan 
Statistical Area (CMSA and PMSA) 

If an area that qualifies as an MA has more than one 
million persons, primary metropolitan statistical areas (PMSA's) 
may be defined within it. PMSA's consist of a large 
urbanized county or cluster of counties that demonstrates 
very strong internal economic and social links, in addition 
to close ties to other portions of the larger area. When 
PMSA's are established, the larger area of which they are 
component parts is designated a consolidated metropoli- 
tan statistical area (CMSA). 

Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) 

Metropolitan statistical areas (MSA's) are relatively free- 
standing MA's and are not closely associated with other 
MA's. These areas typically are surrounded by nonmetro- 
politan counties. 



the most populous central city in the area. The second 
name may be the first city or county name in the most 
populous remaining PMSA; the third name may be the first 
city or county name in the next most populous PMSA. A 
regional designation may be substituted for the second 
and/or third names in a CMSA title if such a designation is 
supported by local opinion and is deemed to be unambig- 
uous and suitable by the Office of Management and 
Budget. 

The titles for all MA's also contain the name of each 
State in which the area is located. Each metropolitan area 
is assigned a four-digit FIPS code, in alphabetical order 
nationwide. If the fourth digit of the code is a "2," it 
identifies a CMSA. Additionally, there is a separate set of 
two-digit codes for CMSA's, also assigned alphabetically. 



OUTLYING AREAS OF THE UNITED STATES 

The Census Bureau treats the outlying areas as the 
statistical equivalents of States for the 1 990 census. The 
outlying areas are American Samoa, Guam, the Common- 
wealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (Northern Mariana 
Islands), Republic of Palau (Palau), Puerto Rico, and the 
Virgin Islands of the United States (Virgin Islands). Geo- 
graphic definitions specific to each outlying area are 
shown in appendix A of the text in the data products for 
each area. 



PLACE 

Places, for the reporting of decennial census data, 
include census designated places and incorporated places. 
Each place is assigned a four-digit census code that is 
unique within State. Each place is also assigned a five-digit 
FIPS code that is unique within State. Both the census and 
FIPS codes are assigned based on alphabetical order 
within State. Consolidated cities (see below) are assigned 
a one-character alphabetical census code that is unique 
nationwide and a five-digit FIPS code that is unique within 
State. 

Census Designated Place (CDP) 



Metropolitan Area Title and Code 

The title of an MSA contains the name of its largest 
central city and up to two additional city names, provided 
that the additional places meet specified levels of popula- 
tion, employment, and commuting. Generally, a city with a 
population of 250,000 or more is in the title, regardless of 
other criteria. 

The title of a PMSA may contain up to three place 
names, as determined above, or up to three county names, 
sequenced in order of population. A CMSA title also may 
include up to three names, the first of which generally is 



Census designated places (CDP's) are delineated for 
the decennial census as the statistical counterparts of 
incorporated places. CDP's comprise densely settled con- 
centrations of population that are identifiable by name, but 
are not legally incorporated places. Their boundaries, 
which usually coincide with visible features or the boundary 
of an adjacent incorporated place, have no legal status, 
nor do these places have officials elected to serve tradi- 
tional municipal functions. CDP boundaries may change 
with changes in the settlement pattern; a CDP with the 
same name as in previous censuses does not necessarily 
have the same boundaries. 



AREA CLASSIFICATIONS 



A-9 



Beginning with the 1950 census, the Census Bureau, in 
cooperation with State agencies and local census statisti- 
cal areas committees, has identified and delineated bound- 
aries for CDP's. In the 1990 census, the name of each 
such place is followed by "CDP." In the 1980 census, 
"(CDP)" was used; in 1970, 1960, and 1950 censuses, 
these places were identified by "(U)," meaning "unincor- 
porated place." 

To qualify as a CDP for the 1990 census, an unincor- 
porated community must have met the following criteria: 

1. In all States except Alaska and Hawaii, the Census 
Bureau uses three population size criteria to designate 
a CDP. These criteria are: 

a. 1 ,000 or more persons if outside the boundaries of 
an urbanized area (UA) delineated for the 1980 
census or a subsequent special census. 

b. 2,500 or more persons if inside the boundaries of 
a UA delineated for the 1980 census or a subse- 
quent special census. 

c. 250 or more persons if outside the boundaries of a 
UA delineated for the 1980 census or a subse- 
quent special census, and within the official bound- 
aries of an American Indian reservation recog- 
nized for the 1990 census. 

2. In Alaska, 25 or more persons if outside a UA, and 
2,500 or more persons if inside a UA delineated for the 
1980 census or a subsequent special census. 

3. In Hawaii, 300 or more persons, regardless of whether 
the community is inside or outside a UA. 



continue to function as separate governments, even though 
they have been included in the consolidated government, 
the primary incorporated place is referred to as a "consol- 
idated city." 

The data presentation for consolidated cities varies 
depending upon the geographic presentation. In hierarchi- 
cal presentations, consolidated cities are not shown. These 
presentations include the semi-independent places and 
the "consolidated city (remainder)." Where the consoli- 
dated city is coextensive with a county or county subdivi- 
sion, the data shown for those areas in hierarchical 
presentations are equivalent to those for the consolidated 
government. 

For inventory geographic presentations, the consoli- 
dated city appears at the end of the listing of places. The 
data for the consolidated city include places that are part 
of the consolidated city. The "consolidated city (remain- 
der)" is the portion of the consolidated government minus 
the semi-independent places, and is shown in alphabetical 
sequence with other places. 

In summary presentations by size of place, the consol- 
idated city is not included. The places semi-independent of 
consolidated cities are categorized by their size, as is the 
"consolidated city (remainder)." 

Each consolidated city is assigned a one-character 
alphabetic census code. Each consolidated city also is 
assigned a five-digit FIPS code that is unique within State. 
The semi-independent places and the "consolidated city 
(remainder)" are assigned a four-digit census code and a 
five-digit FIPS place code that are unique within State. 
Both the census and FIPS codes are assigned based on 
alphabetical order within State. 



For the 1 990 census, CDP's qualified on the basis of the 
population counts prepared for the 1990 Postcensus Local 
Review Program. Because these counts were subject to 
change, a few CDP's may have final population counts 
lower than the minimums shown above. 

Hawaii is the only State with no incorporated places 
recognized by the Bureau of the Census. All places shown 
for Hawaii in the data products are CDP's. By agreement 
with the State of Hawaii, the Census Bureau does not show 
data separately for the city of Honolulu, which is coexten- 
sive with Honolulu County. 

Consolidated City 

A consolidated government is a unit of local govern- 
ment for which the functions of an incorporated place and 
its county or minor civil division (MCD) have merged. The 
legal aspects of this action may result in both the primary 
incorporated place and the county or MCD continuing to 
exist as legal entities, even though the county or MCD 
performs few or no governmental functions and has few or 
no elected officials. Where this occurs, and where one or 
more other incorporated places in the county or MCD 



Incorporated Place 

Incorporated places recognized in 1990 census data 
products are those reported to the Census Bureau as 
legally in existence on January 1, 1990 under the laws of 
their respective States as cities, boroughs, towns, and 
villages, with the following exceptions: the towns in the 
New England States, New York, and Wisconsin, and the 
boroughs in New York are recognized as minor civil 
divisions for census purposes; the boroughs in Alaska are 
county equivalents. 



POPULATION OR HOUSING UNIT DENSITY 

Population or housing unit density is computed by 
dividing the total population or housing units of a geo- 
graphic unit (for example, United States, State, county, 
place) by its land area measured in square kilometers or 
square miles. Density is expressed as both "persons (or 
housing units) per square kilometer" and "persons (or 
housing units) per square mile" of land area in 1990 
census printed reports. 



A-10 



AREA CLASSIFICATIONS 



STATE 

States are the primary governmental divisions of the 
United States. The District of Columbia is treated as a 
statistical equivalent of a State for census purposes. The 
four census regions, nine census divisions, and their 
component States are shown under "CENSUS REGION 
AND CENSUS DIVISION" in this appendix. 

The Census Bureau treats the outlying areas as State 
equivalents for the 1990 census. The outlying areas are 
American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, 
Palau, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands of the United 
States. Geographic definitions specific to each outlying 
area are shown in appendix A in the data products for each 
area. 

Each State and equivalent is assigned a two-digit numeric 
Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) code in 
alphabetical order by State name, followed by the outlying 
area names. Each State and equivalent area also is 
assigned a two-digit census code. This code is assigned 
on the basis of the geographic sequence of each State 
within each census division; the first digit of the code is the 
code for the respective division. Puerto Rico, the Virgin 
Islands, and the outlying areas of the Pacific are assigned 
"0" as the division code. Each State and equivalent area 
also is assigned the two-letter FlPS/United States Postal 
Service (USPS) code. 

In 12 selected States (Connecticut, Maine, Massachu- 
setts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, 
New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and 
Wisconsin), the minor civil divisions also serve as general- 
purpose local governments. The Census Bureau presents 
data for these minor civil divisions in all data products in 
which it provides data for places. 

TIGER 

TIGER is an acronym for the new digital (computer- 
readable) geographic data base that automates the map- 
ping and related geographic activities required to support 
the Census Bureau's census and survey programs. The 
Census Bureau developed the Topological^ Integrated 
Geographic Encoding and Referencing (TIGER) System to 
automate the geographic support processes needed to 
meet the major geographic needs of the 1990 census: 
producing the cartographic products to support data col- 
lection and map publication, providing the geographic 
structure for tabulation and publication of the collected 
data, assigning residential and employer addresses to their 
geographic location and relating those locations to the 
Census Bureau's geographic units, and so forth. The 
content of the TIGER data base is made available to the 
public through a variety of "TIGER Extract" files that may 
be obtained from the Data User Services Division, U.S. 
Bureau of the Census, Washington, DC 20233. 

UNITED STATES 

The United States comprises the 50 States and the 
District of Columbia. In addition, the Census Bureau treats 



the outlying areas as statistical equivalents of States for 
the 1990 census. The outlying areas include American 
Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Palau, Puerto 
Rico, and the Virgin Islands. 

URBAN AND RURAL 

The Census Bureau defines "urban" for the 1990 
census as comprising all territory, population, and housing 
units in urbanized areas and in places of 2,500 or more 
persons outside urbanized areas. More specifically, "urban" 
consists of territory, persons, and housing units in: 

1. Places of 2,500 or more persons incorporated as 
cities, villages, boroughs (except in Alaska and New 
York), and towns (except in the six New England 
States, New York, and Wisconsin), but excluding the 
rural portions of "extended cities." 

2. Census designated places of 2,500 or more persons. 

3. Other territory, incorporated or unincorporated, included 
in urbanized areas. 

Territory, population, and housing units not classified as 
urban constitute "rural." In the 100-percent data products, 
"rural" is divided into "places of less than 2,500" and "not 
in places." The "not in places" category comprises "rural" 
outside incorporated and census designated places and 
the rural portions of extended cities. In many data prod- 
ucts, the term "other rural" is used; "other rural" is a 
residual category specific to the classification of the rural in 
each data product. 

In the sample data products, rural population and hous- 
ing units are subdivided into "rural farm" and "rural 
nonfarm." "Rural farm" comprises all rural households 
and housing units on farms (places from which $1,000 or 
more of agricultural products were sold in 1989); "rural 
nonfarm" comprises the remaining rural. 

The urban and rural classification cuts across the other 
hierarchies; for example, there is generally both urban and 
rural territory within both metropolitan and nonmetropolitan 
areas. 

In censuses prior to 1950, "urban" comprised all terri- 
tory, persons, and housing units in incorporated places of 
2,500 or more persons, and in areas (usually minor civil 
divisions) classified as urban under special rules relating to 
population size and density. The definition of urban that 
restricted itself to incorporated places having 2,500 or 
more persons excluded many large, densely settled areas 
merely because they were not incorporated. Prior to the 
1 950 census, the Census Bureau attempted to avoid some 
of the more obvious omissions by classifying selected 
areas as "urban under special rules." Even with these 
rules, however, many large, closely built-up areas were 
excluded from the urban category. 

To improve its measure of urban territory, population, 
and housing units, the Census Bureau adopted the con- 
cept of the urbanized area and delineated boundaries for 



AREA CLASSIFICATIONS 



A-11 



unincorporated places (now, census designated places) 
for the 1950 census. Urban was defined as territory, 
persons, and housing units in urbanized areas and, outside 
urbanized areas, in all places, incorporated or unincorpo- 
rated, that had 2,500 or more persons. With the following 
three exceptions, the 1950 census definition of urban has 
continued substantially unchanged. First, in the 1960 cen- 
sus (but not in the 1970, 1980, or 1990 censuses), certain 
towns in the New England States, townships in New 
Jersey and Pennsylvania, and Arlington County, Virginia, 
were designated as urban. However, most of these "spe- 
cial rule" areas would have been classified as urban 
anyway because they were included in an urbanized area 
or in an unincorporated place of 2,500 or more persons. 
Second, "extended cities" were identified for the 1970, 
1980, and 1990 censuses. Extended cities primarily affect 
the figures for urban and rural territory (area), but have very 
little effect on the urban and rural population and housing 
units at the national and State levels— although for some 
individual counties and urbanized areas, the effects have 
been more evident. Third, changes since the 1970 census 
in the criteria for defining urbanized areas have permitted 
these areas to be defined around smaller centers. 

Documentation of the urbanized area and extended city 
criteria is available from the Chief, Geography Division, 
U.S. Bureau of the Census, Washington, DC 20233. 

Extended City 

Since the 1960 census, there has been a trend in some 
States toward the extension of city boundaries to include 
territory that is essentially rural in character. The classifi- 
cation of all the population and living quarters of such 
places as urban would include in the urban designation 
territory, persons, and housing units whose environment is 
primarily rural. For the 1 970, 1 980, and 1 990 censuses, the 
Census Bureau identified as rural such territory and its 
population and housing units for each extended city whose 
closely settled area was located in an urbanized area. For 
the 1990 census, this classification also has been applied 
to certain places outside urbanized areas. 

In summary presentations by size of place, the urban 
portion of an extended city is classified by the population of 
the entire place; the rural portion is included in "other 
rural." 



URBANIZED AREA (UA) 

The Census Bureau delineates urbanized areas (UA's) 
to provide a better separation of urban and rural territory, 
population, and housing in the vicinity of large places. A UA 
comprises one or more places ("central place") and the 
adjacent densely settled surrounding territory ("urban fringe") 
that together have a minimum of 50,000 persons. The 
urban fringe generally consists of contiguous territory 
having a density of least 1,000 persons per square mile. 
The urban fringe also includes outlying territory of such 



density if it was connected to the core of the contiguous 
area by road and is within 1 1 /2 road miles of that core, or 
within 5 road miles of the core but separated by water or 
other undevelopable territory. Other territory with a popu- 
lation density of fewer than 1 ,000 people per square mile is 
included in the urban fringe if it eliminates an enclave or 
closes an indentation in the boundary of the urbanized 
area. The population density is determined by (1) outside 
of a place, one or more contiguous census blocks with a 
population density of at least 1,000 persons per square 
mile or (2) inclusion of a place containing census blocks 
that have at least 50 percent of the population of the place 
and a density of at least 1 ,000 persons per square mile. 
The complete criteria are available from the Chief, Geog- 
raphy Division, U.S. Bureau of the Census, Washington, 
DC 20233. 

Urbanized Area Central Place 

One or more central places function as the dominant 
centers of each UA. The identification of a UA central 
place permits the comparison of this dominant center with 
the remaining territory in the UA. There is no limit on the 
number of central places, and not all central places are 
necessarily included in the UA title. UA central places 
include: 

1. Each place entirely (or partially, if the place is an 
extended city) within the UA that is a central city of a 
metropolitan area (MA). 

2. If the UA does not contain an MA central city or is 
located outside of an MA, the central place(s) is 
determined by population size. 

Urbanized Area Title and Code 

The title of a UA identifies those places that are most 
important within the UA; it links the UA to the encompass- 
ing MA, where appropriate. If a single MA includes most of 
the UA, the title and code of the UA generally are the same 
as the title and code of the MA. If the UA is not mostly 
included in a single MA, if it does not include any place that 
is a central city of the encompassing MA, or if it is not 
located in an MA, the Census Bureau uses the population 
size of the included places, with a preference for incorpo- 
rated places, to determine the UA title. The name of each 
State in which the UA is located also is in each UA title. 

The numeric code used to identify each UA is the same 
as the code for the mostly encompassing MA (including 
CMSA and PMSA). If MA title cities represent multiple 
UA's, or the UA title city does not correspond to the first 
name of an MA title, the Census Bureau assigns a code 
based on the alphabetical sequence of the UA title in 
relationship to the other UA and MA titles. 

VOTING DISTRICT (VTD) 

A voting district (VTD) is any of a variety of types of 
areas (for example, election districts, precincts, wards, 
legislative districts) established by State and local govern- 
ments for purposes of elections. For census purposes, 



A-12 



AREA CLASSIFICATIONS 



each State participating in Phase 2 of the 1990 Census 
Redistricting Data Program outlined the boundaries of 
VTD's around groups of whole census blocks on census 
maps. The entities identified as VTD's are not necessarily 
those legally or currently established. Also, to meet the 
"whole block" criterion, a State may have had to adjust 
VTD boundaries to nearby block boundaries. Therefore, 
the VTD's shown on the 1990 census tapes, listings, and 
maps may not represent the actual VTD's in effect at the 
time of the census. In the 1980 census, VTD's were 
referred to as "election precincts." 

Each VTD is assigned a four-character alphanumeric 
code that is unique within each county. The code "ZZZZ" 
is assigned to nonparticipating areas; the Census Bureau 
reports data for areas coded "ZZZZ." 



ZIP CODE® 

ZIP Codes are administrative units established by the 
United States Postal Service (USPS) for the distribution of 
mail. ZIP Codes serve addresses for the most efficient 
delivery of mail, and therefore generally do not respect 
political or census statistical area boundaries. ZIP Codes 
usually do not have clearly identifiable boundaries, often 
serve a continually changing area, are changed periodi- 
cally to meet postal requirements, and do not cover all the 
land area of the United States. ZIP Codes are identified by 
five-digit codes assigned by the USPS. The first three digits 
identify a major city or sectional distribution center, and the 
last two digits generally signify a specific post office's 
delivery area or point. For the 1990 census, ZIP Code data 
are tabulated for the five-digit codes in STF 3B. 



AREA CLASSIFICATIONS 



A-13 



APPENDIX B. 
Definitions of Subject Characteristics 



CONTENTS 

POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS B-2 

Ability to Speak English (See Language Spoken at Home and Ability 

to Speak English) 
Actual Hours Worked Last Week (See Employment Status) 

Age B-2 

American Indian Tribe (See Race) 

Ancestry B-2 

Carpooling (See Journey to Work) 
Children Ever Born (See Fertility) 

Citizenship B-4 

Civilian Labor Force (See Employment Status) 

Class of Worker (See Industry, Occupation, and Class of Worker) 

Disability (See Mobility Limitation Status, see Self-Care Limitation 

Status, see Work Disability Status) 
Earnings in 1989 (See Income in 1989) 

Educational Attainment B-4 

Employment Status B-5 

Families (See Household Type and Relationship) 

Family Composition (See Household Type and Relationship) 

Family Income in 1989 (See Income in 1989) 

Family Size (See Household Type and Relationship) 

Family Type (See Household Type and Relationship) 

Farm Population (See Farm Residence under Housing Characteristics) 

Fertility B-7 

Foreign-Born Persons (See Place of Birth) 

Foster Children (See Household Type and Relationship) 

Group Quarters B-7 

Hispanic Origin B-12 

Household (See Household Type and Relationship) 

Household Income in 1989 (See income in 1989) 

Household Language (See Language Spoken At Home and Ability 

to Speak English) 
Household Size (See Household Type and Relationship) 
Household Type and Relationship B-13 

Householder (See Household Type and Relationship) 
Income Deficit (See Poverty Status in 1989) 

Income in 1989 B-15 

Income Type in 1989 (See Income in 1989) 

Industry, Occupation, and Class of Worker B-1 9 

Institutionalized Persons (See Group Quarters) 

Journey to Work B-21 

Labor Force Status (See Employment Status) 

Language Spoken at Home and Ability to Speak English B-23 

Linguistic Isolation (See Language Spoken at Home and Ability 
to Speak English) 

Marital Status B-25 

Married Couples (See Marital Status) 

Means of Transportation to Work (See Journey to Work) 

Migration (See Residence in 1985) 

Mobility Limitation Status B-26 

Nativity (See Place of Birth) 

Noninstitutionalized Group Quarters (See Group Quarters) 

Occupation (See Industry, Occupation, and Class of Worker) 

Own Children (See Household Type and Relationship) 

Per Capita Income (See Income in 1989) 

Period of Military Service (See Veteran Status) 
Persons in Family (See Household Type and Relationship) 
Persons in Households (See Household Type and Relationship) 

Place of Birth B-26 

Place Of Work (See Journey to Work) 

Poverty Status in 1989 B-27 

Presence of Children (See Household Type and Relationship) 
Private Vehicle Occupancy (See Journey to Work) 

Race B-28 

Reference Week B-31 



Related Children (See Household Type and Relationship) 

Residence in 1985 B-32 

School Enrollment and Labor Force Status B-33 

School Enrollment and Type of School B-33 

Self-Care Limitation Status B-34 

Sex B-34 

Spanish Origin (See Hispanic Origin) 

Stepf amily (See Household Type and Relationship) 

Subfamily (See Household Type and Relationship) 

Time Leaving Home to Go to Work (See Journey to Work) 

Travel Time to Work (See Journey to Work) 
Type of School (See School Enrollment and Type of School) 
Usual Hours Worked Per Week Worked in 1989 (See Work 
Status in 1989) 

Veteran Status B-34 

Weeks Worked in 1989 (See Work Status in 1989) 

Work Disability Status B-35 

Work Status in 1989 B-35 

Worker (See Employment Status, see Industry, Occupation, and Class 

of Worker, see Journey to Work, see Work Status in 1989) 
Workers in Family in 1989 (See Work Status in 1989) 

Year of Entry B-36 

Years of Military Service (See Veteran Status) 

HOUSING CHARACTERISTICS B-36 

Acreage B-37 

Age Of Structure (See Year Structure Built) 

Agricultural Sales B-38 

Bedrooms B-38 

Boarded-Up Status B-38 

Business on Property B-38 

Condominium Fee B-39 

Condominium Status B-39 

Congregate Housing (See Meals Included in Rent) 

Contract Rent B-39 

Crop Sales (See Agricultural Sales) 

Duration of Vacancy B-40 

Farm Residence B-40 

Gross Rent B-40 

Gross Rent as a Percentage of Household Income in 1989.. B-41 
Homeowner Vacancy Rate (See Vacancy Status) 

House Heating Fuel B-41 

Housing Units (See Living Quarters) 

Insurance for Fire, Hazard, and Flood B-41 

Kitchen Facilities B-41 

Living Quarters B-36 

Meals Included in Rent B-41 

Mobile Home Costs B-42 

Months Vacant (See Duration of Vacancy) 

Mortgage Payment B-42 

Mortgage Status B-42 

Occupied Housing Units (See Living Quarters) 
Owner-Occupied Housing Units (See Tenure) 

Persons in Unit B-43 

Persons Per Room B-43 

Plumbing Facilities B-43 

Poverty Status of Households in 1989 B-43 

Real Estate Taxes B-43 

Rental Vacancy Rate (See Vacancy Status) 
Renter-Occupied Housing Units (See Tenure) 

Rooms B-44 

Second or Junior Mortgage Payment B-44 

Selected Monthly Owner Costs B-44 

Selected Monthly Owner Costs as a Percentage of 

Household income in 1989 B-45 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



B-1 



UW4JUUUISSB2 



CONTENTS— Con. 

Sewage Disposal B-45 

Source of Water B-45 

Telephone in Housing Unit B-45 

Tenure B-46 

Type Of Structure (See Units in Structure) 

Units in Structure B-46 

Usual Home Elsewhere B-47 

Utilities B-47 

Vacancy Status B-47 

Vacant Housing Units (See Living Quarters) 

Value B-48 

Vehicles Available B-48 

Year Householder Moved Into Unit B-49 

Year Structure Built B-49 

DERIVED MEASURES B-49 

Interpolation B-49 

Mean B-49 

Median B-49 

Percentages, Rates, and Ratios .,. B-50 

Quartile B-50 



POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS 
AGE 

The data on age were derived from answers to ques- 
tionnaire item 5, which was asked of all persons. The age 
classification is based on the age of the person in com- 
plete years as of April 1, 1990. The age response in 
question 5a was used normally to represent a person's 
age. However, when the age response was unacceptable 
or unavailable, a person's age was derived from an accept- 
able year-of-birth response in question 5b. 

Data on age are used to determine the applicability of 
other questions for a person and to classify other charac- 
teristics in census tabulations. Age data are needed to 
interpret most social and economic characteristics used to 
plan and examine many programs and policies. Therefore, 
age is tabulated by single years of age and by many 
different groupings, such as 5-year age groups. 

Some tabulations are shown by the age of the house- 
holder. These data were derived from the age responses 
for each householder. (For more information on house- 
holder, see the discussion under "Household Type and 
Relationship.") 

Median Age — This measure divides the age distribution 
into two equal parts: one-half of the cases falling below the 
median value and one-half above the value. Generally, 
median age is computed on the basis of more detailed age 
intervals than are shown in some census publications; 
thus, a median based on a less detailed distribution may 
differ slightly from a corresponding median for the same 
population based on a more detailed distribution. (For 
more information on medians, see the discussion under 
"Derived Measures.") 

Limitation of the Data— Counts in 1970 and 1980 for 
persons 100 years old and over were substantially over- 
stated. Improvements were made in the questionnaire 
design, in the allocation procedures, and to the respondent 
instruction guide to attempt to minimize this problem for 
the 1990 census. 



Review of detailed 1990 census information indicated 
that respondents tended to provide their age as of the date 
of completion of the questionnaire, not their age as of April 
1, 1990. In addition, there may have been a tendency for 
respondents to round their age up if they were close to 
having a birthday. It is likely that approximately 10 percent 
of persons in most age groups are actually 1 year younger. 
For most single years of age, the misstatements are 
largely offsetting. The problem is most pronounced at 
age because persons lost to age 1 may not have been 
fully offset by the inclusion of babies born after April 1, 
1 990, and because there may have been more rounding 
up to age 1 to avoid reporting age as years. (Age in 
complete months was not collected for infants under 
age 1.) 

The reporting of age 1 year older than age on April 1, 
1990, is likely to have been greater in areas where the 
census data were collected later in 1990. The magnitude 
of this problem was much less in the three previous 
censuses where age was typically derived from respond- 
ent data on year of birth and quarter of birth. (For more 
information on the design of the age question, see the 
section below that discusses "Comparability.") 

Comparability— Age data have been collected in every 
census. For the first time since 1 950, the 1 990 data are not 
available by quarter year of age. This change was made so 
that coded information could be obtained for both age and 
year of birth. In each census since 1940, the age of a 
person was assigned when it was not reported. In cen- 
suses before 1 940, with the exception of 1 880, persons of 
unknown age were shown as a separate category. Since 
1 960, assignment of unknown age has been performed by 
a general procedure described as "imputation." The spe- 
cific procedures for imputing age have been different in 
each census. (For more information on imputation, see 
Appendix C, Accuracy of the Data.) 

ANCESTRY 

The data on ancestry were derived from answers to 
questionnaire item 13, which was asked of a sample of 
persons. The question was based on self-identification; the 
data on ancestry represent self-classification by people 
according to the ancestry group(s) with which they most 
closely identify. Ancestry refers to a person's ethnic origin 
or descent, "roots," or heritage or the place of birth of the 
person or the person's parents or ancestors before their 
arrival in the United States. Some ethnic identities, such as 
"Egyptian" or "Polish" can be traced to geographic areas 
outside the United States, while other ethnicities such as 
"Pennsylvania Dutch" or "Cajun" evolved in the United 
States. 

The intent of the ancestry question was not to measure 
the degree of attachment the respondent had to a partic- 
ular ethnicity. For example, a response of "Irish" might 
reflect total involvement in an "Irish" community or only a 
memory of ancestors several generations removed from 
the individual. 



B-2 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



The Census Bureau coded the responses through an 
automated review, edit, and coding operation. The open- 
ended write-in ancestry item was coded by subject-matter 
specialists into a numeric representation using a code list 
containing over 1,000 categories. The 1990 code list 
reflects the results of the Census Bureau's own research 
and consultations with many ethnic experts. Many deci- 
sions were made to determine the classification of responses. 
These decisions affected the grouping of the tabulated 
data. For example, the "Assyrian" category includes both 
responses of "Assyrian" and "Chaldean." 

The ancestry question allowed respondents to report 
one or more ancestry groups. While a large number of 
respondents listed a single ancestry, the majority of answers 
included more than one ethnic entry. Generally, only the 
first two responses reported were coded in 1990. If a 
response was in terms of a dual ancestry, for example, 
Irish-English, the person was assigned two codes, in this 
case one for Irish and another for English. 

However, in certain cases, multiple responses such as 
"French Canadian," "Scotch-Irish," "Greek Cypriote," and 
"Black Dutch" were assigned a single code reflecting their 
status as unique groups. If a person reported one of these 
unique groups in addition to another group, for example, 
"Scotch-Irish English," resulting in three terms, that per- 
son received one code for the unique group ("Scotch- 
Irish") and another one for the remaining group ("English"). 
If a person reported "English Irish French," only English 
and Irish were coded. Certain combinations of ancestries 
where the ancestry group is a part of another, such as 
"German-Bavarian," the responses were coded as a sin- 
gle ancestry using the smaller group ("Bavarian"). Also, 
responses such as "Polish-American" or "Italian-American" 
were coded and tabulated as a single entry ("Polish" or 
"Italian"). 

The Census Bureau accepted "American" as a unique 
ethnicity if it was given alone, with an ambiguous response, 
or with State names. If the respondent listed any other 
ethnic identity such as "Italian American," generally the 
"American" portion of the response was not coded. How- 
ever, distinct groups such as "American Indian," "Mexican 
American," and "African American" were coded and iden- 
tified separately because they represented groups who 
considered themselves different from those who reported 
as "Indian," "Mexican," or "African," respectively. 

In all tabulations, when respondents provided an unac- 
ceptable ethnic identity (for example, an uncodeable or 
unintelligible response such as "multi-national," "adopted," 
or "I have no idea"), the answer was included in "Ancestry 
not reported." 

The tabulations on ancestry are presented using two 
types of data presentations — one used total persons as 
the base, and the other used total responses as the base. 
The following are categories shown in the two data pre- 
sentations: 

Presentation Based on Persons: 

Single Ancestries Reported— Includes all persons 
who reported only one ethnic group. Included in this 



category are persons with multiple-term responses 
such as "Scotch-Irish" who are assigned a single 
code. 

Multiple Ancestries Reported— Includes all persons 
who reported more than one group and were assigned 
two ancestry codes. 

Ancestry Unclassified— Includes all persons who pro- 
vided a response that could not be assigned an 
ancestry code because they provided nonsensical 
entries or religious responses. 

Presentations Based on Responses: 

Total Ancestries Reported— Includes the total num- 
ber of ancestries reported and coded. If a person 
reported a multiple ancestry such as "French Dan- 
ish," that response was counted twice in the tabula- 
tions — once in the "French" category and again in 
the "Danish" category. Thus, the sum of the counts 
in this type of presentation is not the total population 
but the total of all responses. 

First Ancestry Reported— Includes the first response 
of all persons who reported at least one codeable 
entry. For example, in this category, the count for 
"Danish" would include all those who reported only 
Danish and those who reported Danish first and then 
some other group. 

Second Ancestry Reported— Includes the second 
response of all persons who reported a multiple 
ancestry. Thus, the count for "Danish" in this cate- 
gory includes all persons who reported Danish as the 
second response, regardless of the first response 
provided. 

The Census Bureau identified hundreds of ethnic groups 
in the 1990 census. However, it was impossible to show 
information for every group in all census tabulations because 
of space constraints. Publications such as the 1990 CP-2, 
Social and Economic Characteristics and the 1990 CPH-3, 
Population and Housing Characteristics for Census Tracts 
and Block Numbering Areas reports show a limited number 
of groups based on the number reported and the advice 
received from experts. A more complete distribution of 
groups is presented in the 1990 Summary Tape File 4, 
supplementary reports, and a special subject report on 
ancestry. In addition, groups identified specifically in the 
questions on race and Hispanic origin (for example, Japa- 
nese, Laotian, Mexican, Cuban, and Spaniard), in general, 
are not shown separately in ancestry tabulations. 

Limitation of the Data — Although some experts consider 
religious affiliation a component of ethnic identity, the 
ancestry question was not designed to collect any infor- 
mation concerning religion. The Bureau of the Census is 
prohibited from collecting information on religion. Thus, if a 
religion was given as an answer to the ancestry question, 
it was coded as an "Other" response. 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



B-3 



Comparability— A question on ancestry was first asked in 
the 1980 census. Although there were no comparable data 
prior to the 1980 census, related information on ethnicity 
was collected through questions on parental birthplace, 
own birthplace, and language which were included in 
previous censuses. Unlike other census questions, there 
was no imputation for nonresponse to the ancestry ques- 
tion. 

In 1990, respondents were allowed to report more than 
one ancestry group; however, only the first two ancestry 
groups identified were coded. In 1980, the Census Bureau 
attempted to code a third ancestry for selected triple- 
ancestry responses. 

New categories such as "Arab" and "West Indian" 
were added to the 1990 question to meet important data 
needs. The "West Indian" category excluded "Hispanic" 
groups such as "Puerto Rican" and "Cuban" that were 
identified primarily through the question on Hispanic origin. 
In 1990, the ancestry group, "American" is recognized and 
tabulated as a unique ethnicity. In 1980, "American" was 
tabulated but included under the category "Ancestry not 
specified." 

A major improvement in the 1 990 census was the use of 
an automated coding system for ancestry responses. The 
automated coding system used in the 1990 census greatly 
reduced the potential for error associated with a clerical 
review. Specialists with a thorough knowledge of the 
subject matter reviewed, edited, coded, and resolved 
inconsistent or incomplete responses. 

CITIZENSHIP 

The data on citizenship were derived from answers to 
questionnaire item 9, which was asked of a sample of 
persons. 

Citizen— Persons who indicated that they were native- 
born and foreign-born persons who indicated that they 
have become naturalized. (For more information on native 
and foreign born, see the discussion under "Place of 
Birth.") 

There are four categories of citizenship: (1) born in the 
United States, (2) born in Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin 
Islands of the United States, or the Commonwealth of the 
Northern Mariana Islands, (3) born abroad of American 
parents, and (4) citizen by naturalization. 

Naturalized Citizen— Foreign-born persons who had 
completed the naturalization process at the time of 
the census and upon whom the rights of citizenship 
had been conferred. 

Not a Citizen— Foreign-born persons who were not citi- 
zens, including persons who had begun but not completed 
the naturalization process at the time of the census. 



Limitation of the Data— Evaluation studies completed 
after previous censuses indicated that some persons may 
have reported themselves as citizens although they had 
not yet attained the status. 

Comparability — Similar questions on citizenship were asked 
in the censuses of 1820, 1830, 1870, 1890 through 1950, 
1 970, and 1 980. The 1 980 question was asked of a sample 
of the foreign-born population. In 1990, both native and 
foreign-born persons who received the long-form question- 
naire were asked to respond to the citizenship question. 

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT 

Data on educational attainment were derived from 
answers to questionnaire item 12, which was asked of a 
sample of persons. Data are tabulated as attainment for 
persons 15 years old and over. Persons are classified 
according to the highest level of school completed or the 
highest degree received. The question included instruc- 
tions to report the level of the previous grade attended or 
the highest degree received for persons currently enrolled 
in school. The question included response categories 
which allowed persons to report completing the 12th grade 
without receiving a high school diploma, and which instructed 
respondents to report as "high school graduate(s)" — per- 
sons who received either a high school diploma or the 
equivalent, for example, passed the Test of General 
Educational Development (G.E.D.), and did not attend 
college. (On the Military Census Report questionnaire, the 
lowest response category was "Less than 9th grade.") 

Instructions included in the 1990 respondent instruction 
guide, which was mailed with the census questionnaire, 
further specified that schooling completed in foreign or 
ungraded school systems should be reported as the 
equivalent level of schooling in the regular American 
system; that vocational certificates or diplomas from voca- 
tional, trade, or business schools or colleges were not to 
be reported unless they were college level degrees; and 
that honorary degrees were not to be reported. The 
instructions gave "medicine, dentistry, chiropractic, optom- 
etry, osteopathic medicine, pharmacy, podiatry, veterinary 
medicine, law, and theology" as examples of professional 
school degrees, and specifically excluded "barber school, 
cosmetology, or other training for a specific trade" from 
the professional school category. The order in which they 
were listed suggested that doctorate degrees were "higher" 
than professional school degrees, which were "higher" 
than master's degrees. 

Persons who did not report educational attainment were 
assigned the attainment of a person of the same age, race 
or Spanish origin, and sex who resided in the same or a 
nearby area. Persons who filled more than one circle were 
edited to the highest level or degree reported. 

High School Graduate or Higher— Includes persons 
whose highest degree was a high school diploma or 



B-4 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



its equivalent, persons who attended college or pro- 
fessional school, and persons who received a col- 
lege, university, or professional degree. Persons who 
reported completing the 12th grade but not receiving 
a diploma are not included. 

Not Enrolled, Not High School Graduate— Includes 
persons of compulsory school attendance age or 
above who were not enrolled in school and were not 
high school graduates; these persons may be taken 
to be "high school dropouts." There is no restriction 
on when they "dropped out" of school, and they may 
have never attended high school. 

In prior censuses, "Median school years completed" 
was used as a summary measure of educational attain- 
ment. In 1990, the median can only be calculated for 
groups of which less than half the members have attended 
college. "Percent high school graduate or higher" and 
"Percent bachelor's degree or higher" are summary mea- 
sures which can be calculated from the present data and 
offer quite readily interpretable measures of differences 
between population subgroups. To make comparisons 
over time, "Percent high school graduate or higher" can be 
calculated and "Percent bachelor's degree or higher" can 
be approximated with data from previous censuses. 

Comparability— From 1840 to 1930, the census mea- 
sured educational attainment by means of a basic literacy 
question. In 1940, a single question was asked on highest 
grade of school completed. In the censuses of 1950 
through 1980, a two-part question asking highest grade of 
school attended and whether that grade was finished was 
used to construct highest grade or year of school com- 
pleted. For persons who have not attended college, the 
response categories in the 1990 educational attainment 
question should produce data which are comparable to 
data on highest grade completed from earlier censuses. 

The response categories for persons who have attended 
college were modified from earlier censuses because 
there was some ambiguity in interpreting responses in 
terms of the number of years of college completed. For 
instance, it was not clear whether "completed the fourth 
year of college," "completed the senior year of college," 
and "college graduate" were synonymous. Research con- 
ducted shortly before the census suggests that these 
terms were more distinct in 1990 than in earlier decades, 
and this change may have threatened the ability to esti- 
mate the number of "college graduates" from the number 
of persons reported as having completed the fourth or a 
higher year of college. It was even more difficult to make 
inferences about post-baccalaureate degrees and "Asso- 
ciate" degrees from highest year of college completed. 
Thus, comparisons of post-secondary educational attain- 
ment in this and earlier censuses should be made with 
great caution. 

In the 1960 and subsequent censuses, persons for 
whom educational attainment was not reported were assigned 
the same attainment level as a similar person whose 

DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



residence was in the same or a nearby area. In the 1940 
and 1950 censuses, persons for whom educational attain- 
ment was not reported were not allocated. 

EMPLOYMENT STATUS 

The data on employment status were derived from 
answers to questionnaire items 21, 25, and 26, which were 
asked of a sample of persons. The series of questions on 
employment status was asked of all persons 15 years old 
and over and was designed to identify, in this sequence: 
(1) persons who worked at any time during the reference 
week; (2) persons who did not work during the reference 
week but who had jobs or businesses from which they 
were temporarily absent (excluding layoff); (3) persons on 
layoff; and (4) persons who did not work during the 
reference week, but who were looking for work during the 
last four weeks and were available for work during the 
reference week. (For more information, see the discussion 
under "Reference Week.") 

The employment status data shown in this and other 
1990 census tabulations relate to persons 16 years old 
and over. Some tabulations showing employment status, 
however, include persons 1 5 years old. By definition, these 
persons are classified as "Not in Labor Force.". In the 
1940, 1950, and 1960 censuses, employment status data 
were presented for persons 14 years old and over. The 
change in the universe was made in 1 970 to agree with the 
official measurement of the labor force as revised in 
January 1967 by the U.S. Department of Labor. The 1970 
census was the last to show employment data for persons 
14 and 15 years old. 

Employed— All civilians 16 years old and over who were 
either (1) "at work"— those who did any work at all during 
the reference week as paid employees, worked in their 
own business or profession, worked on their own farm, or 
worked 15 hours or more as unpaid workers on a family 
farm or in a family business; or (2) were "with a job but not 
at work"— those who did not work during the reference 
week but had jobs or businesses from which they were 
temporarily absent due to illness, bad weather, industrial 
dispute, vacation, or other personal reasons. Excluded 
from the employed are persons whose only activity con- 
sisted of work around the house or unpaid volunteer work 
for religious, charitable, and similar organizations; also 
excluded are persons on active duty in the United States 
Armed Forces. 

Unemployed— All civilians 16 years old and over are 
classified as unemployed if they (1) were neither "at work" 
nor "with a job but not at work" during the reference week, 
and (2) were looking for work during the last 4 weeks, and 
(3) were available to accept a job. Also included as 
unemployed are civilians who did not work at all during the 
reference week and were waiting to be called back to a job 
from which they had been laid off. Examples of job seeking 
activities are: 



B-5 



"mmwhwubm 



• Registering at a public or private employment office 

• Meeting with prospective employers 

• Investigating possibilities for starting a professional 
practice or opening a business 

• Placing or answering advertisements 

• Writing letters of application 

• Being on a union or professional register 

Civilian Labor Force— Consists of persons classified as 
employed or unemployed in accordance with the criteria 
described above. 

Experienced Unemployed— These are unemployed per- 
sons who have worked at any time in the past. 

Experienced Civilian Labor Force— Consists of the employed 
and the experienced unemployed. 

Labor Force— All persons classified in the civilian labor 
force plus members of the U.S. Armed Forces (persons on 
active duty with the United States Army, Air Force, Navy, 
Marine Corps, or Coast Guard). 

Not in Labor Force— All persons 16 years old and over 
who are not classified as members of the labor force. This 
category consists mainly of students, housewives, retired 
workers, seasonal workers enumerated in an off season 
who were not looking for work, institutionalized persons, 
and persons doing only incidental unpaid family work (less 
than 15 hours during the reference week). 

Worker— This term appears in connection with several 
subjects: journey-to-work items, class of worker, weeks 
worked in 1989, and number of workers in family in 1989. 
Its meaning varies and, therefore, should be determined in 
each case by referring to the definition of the subject in 
which it appears. 

Actual Hours Worked Last Week— All persons who 
reported working during the reference week were asked to 
report in questionnaire item 21b the number of hours that 
they worked. The statistics on hours worked pertain to the 
number of hours actually worked at all jobs, and do not 
necessarily reflect the number of hours typically or usually 
worked or the scheduled number of hours. The concept of 
"actual hours" differs from that of "usual hours" described 
below. The number of persons who worked only a small 
number of hours is probably understated since such per- 
sons sometimes consider themselves as not working. 
Respondents were asked to include overtime or extra 
hours worked, but to exclude lunch hours, sick leave, and 
vacation leave. 



Limitation of the Data — The census may understate the 
number of employed persons because persons who have 
irregular, casual, or unstructured jobs sometimes report 
themselves as not working. The number of employed 
persons "at work" is probably overstated in the census 
(and conversely, the number of employed "with a job, but 
not at work" is understated) since some persons on 
vacation or sick leave erroneously reported themselves as 
working. This problem has no effect on the total number of 
employed persons. The reference week for the employ- 
ment data is not the same for all persons. Since persons 
can change their employment status from one week to 
another, the lack of a uniform reference week may mean 
that the employment data do not reflect the reality of the 
employment situation of any given week. (For more infor- 
mation, see the discussion under "Reference Week.") 

Comparability — The questionnaire items and employment 
status concepts for the 1990 census are essentially the 
same as those used in the 1980 and 1970 censuses. 
However, these concepts differ in many respects from 
those associated with the 1 950 and 1 960 censuses. 

Since employment data from the census are obtained 
from respondents in households, they differ from statistics 
based on reports from individual business establishments, 
farm enterprises, and certain government programs. Per- 
sons employed at more than one job are counted only 
once in the census and are classified according to the job 
at which they worked the greatest number of hours during 
the reference week. In statistics based on reports from 
business and farm establishments, persons who work for 
more than one establishment may be counted more than 
once. Moreover, some tabulations may exclude private 
household workers, unpaid family workers, and self-employed 
persons, but may include workers less than 16 years of 
age. 

An additional difference in the data arises from the fact 
that persons who had a job but were not at work are 
included with the employed in the census statistics, whereas 
many of these persons are likely to be excluded from 
employment figures based on establishment payroll reports. 
Furthermore, the employment status data in census tabu- 
lations include persons on the basis of place of residence 
regardless of where they work, whereas establishment 
data report persons at their place of work regardless of 
where they live. This latter consideration is particularly 
significant when comparing data for workers who commute 
between areas. 

Census data on actual hours worked during the refer- 
ence week may differ from data from other sources. The 
census measures hours actually worked, whereas some 
surveys measure hours paid for by employers. Compara- 
bility of census actual hours worked data may also be 
affected by the nature of the reference week (see "Refer- 
ence Week"). 

For several reasons, the unemployment figures of the 
Census Bureau are not comparable with published figures 
on unemployment compensation claims. For example, 



B-6 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



figures on unemployment compensation claims exclude 
persons who have exhausted their benefit rights, new 
workers who have not earned rights to unemployment 
insurance, and persons losing jobs not covered by unem- 
ployment insurance systems (including some workers in 
agriculture, domestic services, and religious organizations, 
and self-employed and unpaid family workers). In addition, 
the qualifications for drawing unemployment compensa- 
tion differ from the definition of unemployment used by the 
Census Bureau. Persons working only a few hours during 
the week and persons with a job but not at work are 
sometimes eligible for unemployment compensation but 
are classified as "Employed" in the census. Differences in 
the geographical distribution of unemployment data arise 
because the place where claims are filed may not neces- 
sarily be the same as the place of residence of the 
unemployed worker. 

The figures on employment status from the decennial 
census are generally comparable with similar data col- 
lected in the Current Population Survey. However, some 
difference may exist because of variations in enumeration 
and processing techniques. 

FERTILITY 

The data on fertility (also referred to as "children ever 
born") were derived from answers to questionnaire item 
20, which was asked of a sample of women 15 years old 
and over regardless of marital status. Stillbirths, stepchil- 
dren, and adopted children were excluded from the num- 
ber of children ever born. Ever-married women were 
instructed to include all children born to them before and 
during their most recent marriage, children no longer living, 
and children away from home, as well as children who 
were still living in the home. Never-married women were 
instructed to include all children born to them. 

Data are most frequently presented in terms of the 
aggregate number of children ever born to women in the 
specified category and in terms of the rate per 1,000 
women. For purposes of calculating the aggregate, the 
open-ended response category, "12 or more" is assigned 
a value of 13. 

Limitation of the Data— Although the data are assumed 
to be less complete for out-of-wedlock births than for births 
occurring within marriage, comparisons of 1980 census 
data on the fertility of single women with other census 
sources and administrative records indicate that no signif- 
icant differences were found between different data sources; 
that is, 1980 census data on children ever born to single 
women were complete with no significant understatements 
of childbearing. 

Comparability— The wording of the question on children 
ever born was the same in 1990 as in 1980. In 1970, 
however, the question on children ever born was asked of 
all ever-married women but only of never-married women 

DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



who received self-administered questionnaires. Therefore, 
rates and numbers of children ever born to single women 
in 1970 may be understated. Data presented for children 
ever born to ever-married women are comparable for the 
1990 census and all previous censuses containing this 
question. 

GROUP QUARTERS 

All persons not living in households are classified by the 
Census Bureau as living in group quarters. Two general 
categories of persons in group quarters are recognized: 
(1) institutionalized persons and (2) other persons in group 
quarters (also referred to as "noninstitutional group quar- 
ters"). 

Institutionalized Persons— Includes persons under for- 
mally authorized, supervised care or custody in institutions 
at the time of enumeration. Such persons are classified as 
"patients or inmates" of an institution regardless of the 
availability of nursing or medical care, the length of stay, or 
the number of persons in the institution. Generally, institu- 
tionalized persons are restricted to the institutional build- 
ings and grounds (or must have passes or escorts to 
leave) and thus have limited interaction with the surround- 
ing community. Also, they are generally under the care of 
trained staff who have responsibility for their safekeeping 
and supervision. 

Type of Institution— The type of institution was deter- 
mined as part of census enumeration activities. For insti- 
tutions which specialize in only one specific type of serv- 
ice, all patients or inmates were given the same classification. 
For institutions which had multiple types of major services 
(usually general hospitals and Veterans' Administration 
hospitals), patients were classified according to selected 
types of wards. For example, in psychiatric wards of 
hospitals, patients were classified in "mental (psychiatric) 
hospitals"; in hospital wards for persons with chronic 
diseases, patients were classified in "hospitals for the 
chronically ill." Each patient or inmate was classified in 
only one type of institution. Institutions include the follow- 
ing types: 

Correctional Institutions — Includes prisons, Federal deten- 
tion centers, military stockades and jails, police lockups, 
halfway houses, local jails, and other confinement facil- 
ities, including work farms. 

Prisons — Where persons convicted of crimes serve 
their sentences. In some census products, the pris- 
ons are classified by two types of control: 
(1) "Federal" (operated by the Bureau of Prisons of 
the Department of Justice) and (2) "State." Resi- 
dents who are criminally insane were classified on 
the basis of where they resided at the time of 
enumeration: (1) in institutions (or hospital wards) 



B-7 



l wwrifWiTyTTi " i.iru m i n i i n 



operated by departments of correction or similar 
agencies; or (2) in institutions operated by depart- 
ments of mental health or similar agencies. 

Federal Detention Centers — Operated by the Immi- 
gration and Naturalization Service (INS) and the 
Bureau of Prisons. These facilities include detention 
centers used by the Park Police; Bureau of Indian 
Affairs Detention Centers; INS Centers, such as the 
INS Federal Alien Detention Facility; INS Processing 
Centers; and INS Contract Detention Centers used to 
detain aliens under exclusion or deportation proceed- 
ings, as well as those aliens who have not been 
placed into proceedings, such as custodial required 
departures; and INS Detention Centers operated 
within local jails, and State and Federal prisons. 

Military Stockades, Jails — Operated by military police 
and used to hold persons awaiting trial or convicted 
of violating military laws. 

Local Jails and Other Confinement Facilities — In- 
cludes facilities operated by counties and cities that 
primarily hold persons beyond arraignment, usually 
for more than 48 hours. Also included in this category 
are work farms used to hold persons awaiting trial or 
serving time on relatively short sentences and jails 
run by private businesses under contract for local 
governments (but not by State governments). 

Police Lockups— Temporary-holding facilities oper- 
ated by county and city police that hold persons for 
48 hours or less only if they have not been formally 
charged in court. 

Halfway Houses — Operated for correctional purposes 
and include probation and restitution centers, pre- 
release centers, and community-residential centers. 

Other Types of Correctional Institutions— Privately 
operated correctional facilities and correctional facil- 
ities specifically for alcohol/drug abuse. 

Nursing Homes — Comprises a heterogeneous group of 
places. The majority of patients are elderly, although 
persons who require nursing care because of chronic 
physical conditions may be found in these homes 
regardless of their age. Included in this category are 
skilled-nursing facilities, intermediate-care facilities, long- 
term care rooms in wards or buildings on the grounds of 
hospitals, or long-term care rooms/nursing wings in 
congregate housing facilities. Also included are nursing, 
convalescent, and rest homes, such as soldiers', sail- 
ors', veterans', and fraternal or religious homes for the 
aged, with or without nursing care. In some census 
products, nursing homes are classified by type of own- 
ership as "Federal," "State," "Private not-for-profit," 
and "Private for profit." 



Mental (Psychiatric) Hospitals— Includes hospitals or 
wards for the criminally insane not operated by a prison, 
and psychiatric wards of general hospitals and veterans' 
hospitals. Patients receive supervised medical/nursing 
care from formally-trained staff. In some census prod- 
ucts, mental hospitals are classified by type of owner- 
ship as "Federal," "State or local," "Private," and 
"Ownership not known." 

Hospitals for Chronically III— Includes hospitals for patients 
who require long-term care, including those in military 
hospitals and wards for the chronically ill located on 
military bases; or other hospitals or wards for the 
chronically ill, which include tuberculosis hospitals or 
wards, wards in general and Veterans' Administration 
hospitals for the chronically ill, neurological wards, 
hospices, wards for patients with Hansen's Disease 
(leprosy) and other incurable diseases, and other unspec- 
ified wards for the chronically ill. Patients who had no 
usual home elsewhere were enumerated as part of the 
institutional population in the wards of general and 
military hospitals. Most hospital patients are at the 
hospital temporarily and were enumerated at their usual 
place of residence. (For more information, see "Wards 
in General and Military Hospitals for Patients Who Have 
No Usual Home Elsewhere.") 

Schools, Hospitals, or Wards for the Mentally Retard- 
ed—Includes those institutions such as wards in hospi- 
tals for the mentally retarded, and intermediate-care 
facilities for the mentally retarded that provide super- 
vised medical/nursing care from formally-trained staff. 
In some census products, this category is classified by 
type of ownership as "Federal," "State or local," "Pri- 
vate," and "Ownership not known." 

Schools, Hospitals, or Wards for the Physically Handi- 
capped—Includes three types of institutions: institutions 
for the blind, those for the deaf, and orthopedic wards 
and institutions for the physically handicapped. Institu- 
tions for persons with speech problems are classified 
with "institutions for the deaf." The category "orthope- 
dic wards and institutions for the physically handi- 
capped" includes those institutions providing relatively 
long-term care to accident victims, and to persons with 
polio, cerebral palsy, and muscular dystrophy. In some 
census products, this category is classified by type of 
ownership as "Public," "Private," and "Ownership not 
known." 

Hospitals, and Wards for Drug/Alcohol Abuse— Includes 
hospitals, and hospital wards in psychiatric and general 
hospitals. These facilities are equipped medically and 
designed for the diagnosis and treatment of medical or 
psychiatric illnesses associated with alcohol or drug 
abuse. Patients receive supervised medical care from 
formally-trained staff. 



B-8 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



Wards in General and Military Hospitals for Patients 
Who Have No Usual Home Elsewhere— Includes mater- 
nity, neonatal, pediatric (including wards for boarder 
babies), military, and surgical wards of hospitals, and 
wards for persons with infectious diseases. 

Juvenile Institutions— Includes homes, schools, and other 
institutions providing care for children (short- or long- 
term care). Juvenile institutions include the following 
types: 

Homes for Abused, Dependent, and Neglected Chil- 
dren— Includes orphanages and other institutions 
which provide long-term care (usually more than 30 
days) for children. This category is classified in some 
census products by type of ownership as "Public" 
and "Private." 

Residential Treatment Centers— Includes those insti- 
tutions which primarily serve children who, by clinical 
diagnosis, are moderately or seriously disturbed emo- 
tionally. Also, these institutions provide long-term 
treatment services, usually supervised or directed by 
a psychiatrist. 

Training Schools for Juvenile Delinquents — Includes 
residential training schools or homes, and industrial 
schools, camps, or farms for juvenile delinquents. 

Public Training Schools for Juvenile Delinquents— 
Usually operated by a State agency (for example, 
department of welfare, corrections, or a youth 
authority). Some are operated by county and city 
governments. These public training schools are 
specialized institutions serving delinquent children, 
generally between the ages of 10 and 17 years 
old, all of whom are committed by the courts. 

Private Training Schools— Operated under private 
auspices. Some of the children they serve are 
committed by the courts as delinquents. Others 
are referred by parents or social agencies because 
of delinquent behavior. One difference between 
private and public training schools is that, by their 
administrative policy, private schools have control 
over their selection and intake. 

Detention Centers— Includes institutions providing short- 
term care (usually 30 days or less) primarily for 
delinquent children pending disposition of their cases 
by a court. This category also covers diagnostic 
centers. In practice, such institutions may be caring 
for both delinquent and neglected children pending 
court disposition. 

Other Persons in Group Quarters (also referred to as 
"noninstitutional group quarters")— Includes all per- 
sons who live in group quarters other than institutions. 
p ersons who live in the following living quarters are 



classified as "other persons in group quarters" when there 
are 10 or more unrelated persons living in the unit; 
otherwise, these living quarters are classified as housing 
units. 

Rooming Houses — Includes persons residing in room- 
ing and boarding houses and living in quarters with 1 or 
more unrelated persons. 

Group Homes— Includes "community-based homes" 
that provide care and supportive services. Such places 
include homes for the mentally ill, mentally retarded, 
and physically handicapped; drug/alcohol halfway houses; 
communes; and maternity homes for unwed mothers. 

Homes for the Mentally ///—Includes community- 
based homes that provide care primarily for the 
mentally ill. In some data products, this category is 
classified by type of ownership as "Federal," "State," 
"Private," and "Ownership not known." Homes which 
combine treatment of the physically handicapped 
with treatment of the mentally ill are counted as 
homes for the mentally ill. 

Homes for the Mentally Retarded— Includes community- 
based homes that provide care primarily for the 
mentally retarded. Homes which combine treatment 
of the physically handicapped with treatment of the 
mentally retarded are counted as homes for the 
mentally retarded. This category is classified by type 
of ownership in some census products, as "Federal," 
"State," "Private," or "Ownership not known." 

Homes for the Physically Handicapped— Includes 
community-based homes for the blind, for the deaf, 
and other community-based homes for the physically 
handicapped. Persons with speech problems are 
classified with homes for the deaf. In some census 
products, this category is classified by type of own- 
ership as "Public," "Private," or "Ownership not 
known." 

Homes or Halfway Houses for Drug '/Alcohol 'Abuse— -In- 
cludes persons with no usual home elsewhere in 
places that provide community-based care and sup- 
portive services to persons suffering from a drug/al- 
cohol addiction and to recovering alcoholics and drug 
abusers. Places providing community-based care for 
drug and alcohol abusers include group homes, 
detoxification centers, quarterway houses (residen- 
tial treatment facilities that work closely with accred- 
ited hospitals), halfway houses, and recovery homes 
for ambulatory, mentally competent recovering alco- 
holics and drug abusers who may be re-entering the 
work force. 

Maternity Homes for Unwed Mothers — Includes per- 
sons with no usual home elsewhere in places that 
provide domestic care for unwed mothers and their 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



B-9 



children. These homes may provide social services 
and post-natal care within the facility, or may make 
arrangements for women to receive such services in 
the community. Nursing services are usually available 
in the facility. 

Other Group Homes — Includes persons with no usual 
home elsewhere in communes, foster care homes, 
and job corps centers with 10 or more unrelated 
persons. These types of places provide communal 
living quarters, generally for persons who have formed 
their own community in which they have common 
interests and often share or own property jointly. 

Religious Group Quarters— Includes, primarily, group 
quarters for nuns teaching in parochial schools and for 
priests living in rectories. It also includes other convents 
and monasteries, except those associated with a gen- 
eral hospital or an institution. 

College Quarters Off Campus— Includes privately-owned 
rooming and boarding houses off campus, if the place is 
reserved exclusively for occupancy by college students 
and if there are 1 or more unrelated persons. In census 
products, persons in this category are classified as living 
in a college dormitory. 

Persons residing in certain other types of living arrange- 
ments are classified as living in "noninstitutional group 
quarters" regardless of the number of people sharing the 
unit. These include persons residing in the following types 
of group quarters: 

College Dormitories— Includes college students in dor- 
mitories (provided the dormitory is restricted to students 
who do not have their families living with them), frater- 
nity and sorority houses, and on-campus residential 
quarters used exclusively for those in religious orders 
who are attending college. Students in privately-owned 
rooming and boarding houses off campus are also 
included, if the place is reserved exclusively for occu- 
pancy by college-level students and if there are 10 or 
more unrelated persons. 

Military Quarters— Includes military personnel living in 
barracks and dormitories on base, in transient quarters 
on base for temporary residents (both civilian and 
military), and on military ships. However, patients in 
military hospitals receiving treatment for chronic dis- 
eases or who had no usual home elsewhere, and 
persons being held in military stockades were included 
as part of the institutional population. 

Agriculture Workers' Dormitories— Includes persons in 
migratory farm workers' camps on farms, bunkhouses 
for ranch hands, and other dormitories on farms, such 
as those on "tree farms." 



Other Workers' Dormitories — Includes persons in log- 
ging camps, construction workers' camps, firehouse 
dormitories, job-training camps, energy enclaves (Alaska 
only), and nonfarm migratory workers' camps (for exam- 
ple, workers in mineral and mining camps). 

Emergency Shelters for Homeless Persons (with sleep- 
ing facilities) and Visible in Street Locations — Includes 
persons enumerated during the "Shelter-and-Street- 
Night" operation primarily on March 20-21, 1990. Enu- 
merators were instructed not to ask if a person was 
"homeless." If a person was at one of the locations 
below on March 20-21, the person was counted as 
described below. (For more information on the "Shelter- 
and-Street-Night" operation, see Appendix D, Collec- 
tion and Processing Procedures.) This category is divided 
into four classifications: 

Emergency Shelters for Homeless Persons (with 
sleeping facilities) — Includes persons who stayed 
overnight on March 20, 1990, in permanent and 
temporary emergency housing, missions, hotels/mo- 
tels, and flophouses charging $12 or less (excluding 
taxes) per night; Salvation Army shelters, hotels, and 
motels used entirely for homeless persons regard- 
less of the nightly rate charged; rooms in hotels and 
motels used partially for the homeless; and similar 
places known to have persons who have no usual 
home elsewhere staying overnight. If not shown 
separately, shelters and group homes that provide 
temporary sleeping facilities for runaway, neglected, 
and homeless children are included in this category 
in data products. 

Shelters for Runaway, Neglected, and Homeless 
Children — Includes shelters/group homes which pro- 
vide temporary sleeping facilities for juveniles. 

Visible in Street Locations— Includes street blocks 
and open public locations designated before 
March 20, 1990, by city and community officials as 
places where the homeless congregate at night. All 
persons found at predesignated street sites from 2 
a.m. to 4 a.m. and leaving abandoned or boarded-up 
buildings from 4 a.m. to 8 a.m. on March 21, 1990, 
were enumerated during "street" enumeration, except 
persons in uniform such as police and persons 
engaged in obvious money-making activities other 
than begging or panhandling. Enumerators were 
instructed not to ask if a person was "homeless." 
This cannot be considered a complete count of all 
persons living on the streets because those who 
were so well hidden that local people did not know 
where to find them were likely to have been missed 
as were persons moving about or in places not 
identified by local officials. It is also possible that 
persons with homes could have been included in the 
count of "visible in street locations" if they were 
present when the enumerator did the enumeration of 
a particular block. 



B-10 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



Predesignated street sites include street corners, 
parks, bridges, persons emerging from abandoned 
and boarded-up buildings, noncommercial campsites 
(tent cities), all-night movie theaters, all-night restau- 
rants, emergency hospital waiting rooms, train sta- 
tions, airports, bus depots, and subway stations. 

Shelters for Abused Women (Shelters Against Domes- 
tic Violence or Family Crisis Centers)— \nc\udes 
community-based homes or shelters that provide 
domiciliary care for women who have sought shelter 
from family violence and who may have been physi- 
cally abused. Most shelters also provide care for 
children of abused women. These shelters may pro- 
vide social services, meals, psychiatric treatment, 
and counseling. In some census products, "shelters 
for abused women" are included in the category 
"other noninstitutional group quarters." 

Dormitories for Nurses and Interns in General and 
Military Hospitals— Includes group quarters for nurses 
and other staff members. It excludes patients. 

Crews of Maritime Vessels— Includes officers, crew 
members, and passengers of maritime U.S. flag ves- 
sels. All ocean-going and Great Lakes ships are included. 

Staff Residents of Institutions— Includes staff residing in 
group quarters on institutional grounds who provide 
formally-authorized, supervised care or custody for the 
institutionalized population. 

Other Nonhousehold Living Situations— Includes per- 
sons with no usual home elsewhere enumerated during 
transient or "T-Night" enumeration at YMCA's, YWCA's, 
youth hostels, commercial and government-run camp- 
grounds, campgrounds at racetracks, fairs, and carni- 
vals, and similar transient sites. 

Living Quarters for Victims of Natural Disasters— In- 
cludes living quarters for persons temporarily displaced 
by natural disasters. 

Limitation of the Data — Two types of errors can occur in 
the classification of "types of group quarters": 

1 . Misclassification of Group Quarters— During the 1 990 
Special Place Prelist operation, the enumerator deter- 
mined the type of group quarters associated with each 
special place in their assignment. The enumerator 
used the Alphabetical Group Quarters Code List and 
Index to the Alphabetical Group Quarters Code List to 
assign a two-digit code number followed by either an 
"I," for institutional, or an "N," for noninstitutional to 
each group quarters. In 1990, unacceptable group 
quarter codes were edited. (For more information on 
editing of unacceptable data, see Appendix C, Accu- 
racy of the Data.) 

DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



2. No Classification (unknowns) — The imputation rate for 
type of institution was higher in 1980 (23.5 percent) 
than in 1970 (3.3 percent). Improvements were made 
to the 1990 Alphabetical Group Quarters Code List; 
that is, the inclusion of more group quarters categories 
and an "Index to the Alphabetical Group Quarters 
Code List." (For more information on the allocation 
rates for Type of Institution, see the allocation rates in 
1990 CP-1, General Population Characteristics.) 

In previous censuses, allocation rates for demographic 
characteristics (such as age, sex, race, and marital status) 
of the institutional population were similar to those for the 
total population. The allocation rates for sample charac- 
teristics such as school enrollment, highest grade com- 
pleted, income, and veteran status for the institutional and 
noninstitutional group quarters population have been sub- 
stantially higher than the population in households at least 
as far back as the 1 960 census. The data, however, have 
historically presented a reasonable picture of the institu- 
tional and noninstitutional group quarters population. 

Shelter and Street Night (S- Night)— -For the 1 990 census 
"Shelter-and-Street-Night" operation, persons well hid- 
den, moving about, or in locations enumerators did not visit 
were likely to be missed. The number of people missed will 
never be known; thus, the 1990 census cannot be consid- 
ered to include a definitive count of America's total home- 
less population. It does, however, give an idea of relative 
differences among areas of the country. Other compo- 
nents were counted as part of regular census procedures. 
The count of persons in shelters and visible on the 
street could have been affected by many factors. How 
much the factors affected the count can never be answered 
definitively, but some elements include: 

1 . How well enumerators were trained and how well they 
followed procedures. 

2. How well the list of shelter and street locations given 
to the Census Bureau by the local government reflected 
the actual places that homeless persons stay at night. 

3. Cities were encouraged to open temporary shelters for 
census night, and many did that and actively encour- 
aged people to enter the shelters. Thus, people who 
may have been on the street otherwise were in 
shelters the night of March 20, so that the ratio of 
shelter-to-street population could be different than 
usual. 

4. The weather, which was unusually cold in some parts 
of the country, could affect how likely people were to 
seek emergency shelter or to be more hidden than 
usual if they stayed outdoors. 

5. The media occasionally interfered with the ability to do 
the count. 

6. How homeless people perceived the census and 
whether they wanted to be counted or feared the 
census and hid from it. 

B-11 



■mnmi 



The Census Bureau conducted two assessments of 
Shelter and Street Night: (1) the quality of the lists of 
shelters used for the Shelter-and-Street-Night operation, 
and (2) how well procedures were followed by census- 
takers for the street count in parts of five cities (Chicago, 
Los Angeles, New Orleans, New York, and Phoenix). 
Information about these two assessments is available from 
the Chief, Center for Survey Methods Research, Bureau of 
the Census, Washington, DC 20233. 

Comparability— For the 1990 census, the definition of 
institutionalized persons was revised so that the definition 
of "care" only includes persons under organized medical 
or formally-authorized, supervised care or custody. As a 
result of this change to the institutional definition, maternity 
homes are classified as noninstitutional rather than insti- 
tutional group quarters as in previous censuses. The 
following types of other group quarters are classified as 
institutional rather than noninstitutional group quarters: 
"halfway houses (operated for correctional purposes)" 
and "wards in general and military hospitals for patients 
who have no usual home elsewhere," which includes 
maternity, neonatal, pediatric, military, and surgical wards 
of hospitals, other-purpose wards of hospitals, and wards 
for infectious diseases. These changes should not signifi- 
cantly affect the comparability of data with earlier cen- 
suses because of the relatively small number of persons 
involved. 

As in 1 980, 1 or more unrelated persons living together 
were classified as living in noninstitutional group quarters. 
In 1970, the criteria was six or more unrelated persons. 

Several changes also have occurred in the identification 
of specific types of group quarters. For the first time, the 
1990 census identifies separately the following types of 
correctional institutions: persons in halfway houses (oper- 
ated for correctional purposes), military stockades and 
jails, and police lockups. In 1990, tuberculosis hospitals or 
wards are included with hospitals for the chronically ill; in 
1980, they were shown separately. For 1990, the noninsti- 
tutional group quarters category, "Group homes" is further 
classified as: group homes for drug/alcohol abuse; mater- 
nity homes (for unwed mothers), group homes for the 
mentally ill, group homes for the mentally retarded, and 
group homes for the physically handicapped. Persons 
living in communes, foster-care homes, and job corps 
centers are classified with "Other group homes" only if 10 
or more unrelated persons share the unit; otherwise, they 
are classified as housing units. 

In 1990, workers' dormitories were classified as group 
quarters regardless of the number of persons sharing the 
dorm. In 1980, 10 or more unrelated persons had to share 
the dorm for it to be classified as a group quarters. In 1 960, 
data on persons in military barracks were shown only for 
men. In subsequent censuses, they include both men and 
women. 

In 1990 census data products, the phrase "inmates of 
institutions" was changed to "institutionalized persons." 
Also, persons living in noninstitutional group quarters were 



referred to as "other persons in group quarters," and the 
phrase "staff residents" was used for staff living in institu- 
tions. 

In 1990, there are additional institutional categories and 
noninstitutional group quarters categories compared with 
the 1 980 census. The institutional categories added include 
"hospitals and wards for drug/alcohol abuse" and "mili- 
tary hospitals for the chronically ill." The noninstitutional 
group quarters categories added include emergency shel- 
ters for homeless persons; shelters for runaway, neglected, 
and homeless children; shelters for abused women; and 
visible-in-street locations. Each of these noninstitutional 
group quarters categories was enumerated on March 
20-21, 1990, during the "Shelter-and-Street-Night" opera- 
tion. (For more information on the "Shelter-and-Street- 
Night" operation, see Appendix D, Collection and Process- 
ing Procedures.) 

HISPANIC ORIGIN 

The data on Spanish/Hispanic origin were derived from 
answers to questionnaire item 7, which was asked of all 
persons. Persons of Hispanic origin are those who classi- 
fied themselves in one of the specific Hispanic origin 
categories listed on the questionnaire— "Mexican," "Puerto 
Rican," or "Cuban"— as well as those who indicated that 
they were of "other Spanish/Hispanic" origin. Persons of 
"Other Spanish/Hispanic" origin are those whose origins 
are from Spain, the Spanish-speaking countries of Central 
or South America, or the Dominican Republic, or they are 
persons of Hispanic origin identifying themselves generally 
as Spanish, Spanish-American, Hispanic, Hispano, Latino, 
and so on. Write-in responses to the "other Spanish/His- 
panic" category were coded only for sample data. 

Origin can be viewed as the ancestry, nationality group, 
lineage, or country of birth of the person or the person's 
parents or ancestors before their arrival in the United 
States. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race. 

Some tabulations are shown by the Hispanic origin of 
the householder. In all cases where households, families, 
or occupied housing units are classified by Hispanic origin, 
the Hispanic origin of the householder is used. (See the 
discussion of householder under "Household Type and 
Relationship.") 

During direct interviews conducted by enumerators, if a 
person could not provide a single origin response, he or 
she was asked to select, based on self-identification, the 
group which best described his or her origin or descent. If 
a person could not provide a single group, the origin of the 
person's mother was used. If a single group could not be 
provided for the person's mother, the first origin reported 
by the person was used. 

If any household member failed to respond to the 
Spanish/Hispanic origin question, a response was assigned 
by the computer according to the reported entries of other 
household members by using specific rules of precedence 
of household relationship. In the processing of sample 



B-12 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



questionnaires, responses to other questions on the ques- 
tionnaire, such as ancestry and place of birth, were used to 
assign an origin before any reference was made to the 
origin reported by other household members. If an origin 
was not entered for any household member, an origin was 
assigned from another household according to the race of 
the householder. This procedure is a variation of the 
general imputation process described in Appendix C, Accu- 
racy of the Data. 

Comparability — There may be differences between the 
total Hispanic origin population based on 100-percent 
tabulations and sample tabulations. Such differences are 
the result of sampling variability, nonsampling error, and 
more extensive edit procedures for the Spanish/Hispanic 
origin item on the sample questionnaires. (For more infor- 
mation on sampling variability and nonsampling error, see 
Appendix C, Accuracy of the Data.) 

The 1990 data on Hispanic origin are generally compa- 
rable with those for the 1980 census. However, there are 
some differences in the format of the Hispanic origin 
question between the two censuses. For 1990, the word 
"descent" was deleted from the 1980 wording. In addition, 
the term "Mexican-Amer." used in 1980 was shortened 
further to "Mexican-Am." to reduce misreporting (of "Amer- 
ican") in this category detected in the 1 980 census. Finally, 
the 1990 question allowed those who reported as "other 
Spanish/Hispanic" to write in their specific Hispanic origin 
group. 

Misreporting in the "Mexican-Amer." category of the 
1980 census item on Spanish/Hispanic origin may affect 
the comparability of 1980 and 1990 census data for 
persons of Hispanic origin for certain areas of the country. 
An evaluation of the 1980 census item on Spanish/His- 
panic origin indicated that there was misreporting in the 
Mexican origin category by White and Black persons in 
certain areas. The study results showed evidence that the 
misreporting occurred in the South (excluding Texas), the 
Northeast (excluding the New York City area), and a few 
States in the Midwest Region. Also, results based on 
available data suggest that the impact of possible misre- 
porting of Mexican origin in the 1 980 census was severe in 
those portions of the above-mentioned regions where the 
Hispanic origin population was generally sparse. However, 
national 1980 census data on the Mexican origin popula- 
tion or total Hispanic origin population at the national level 
was not seriously affected by the reporting problem. (For a 
more detailed discussion of the evaluation of the 1980 
census Spanish/Hispanic origin item, see the 1980 census 
Supplementary Reports.) 

The 1990 and 1980 census data on the Hispanic 
population are not directly comparable with 1970 Spanish 
origin data because of a number of factors: (1) overall 
improvements in the 1 980 and 1 990 censuses, (2) better 
coverage of the population, (3) improved question designs, 
and (4) an effective public relations campaign by the 
Census Bureau with the assistance of national and com- 
munity ethnic groups. 



Specific changes in question design between the 1980 
and 1970 censuses included the placement of the cate- 
gory "No, not Spanish/Hispanic" as the first category in 
that question. (The corresponding category appeared last 
in the 1970 question.) Also, the 1970 category "Central or 
South American" was deleted because in 1970 some 
respondents misinterpreted the category; furthermore, the 
designations "Mexican-American" and "Chicano" were 
added to the Spanish/Hispanic origin question in 1980. In 
the 1970 census, the question on Spanish origin was 
asked of only a 5-percent sample of the population. 

HOUSEHOLD TYPE AND RELATIONSHIP 
Household 

A household includes all the persons who occupy a 
housing unit. A housing unit is a house, an apartment, a 
mobile home, a group of rooms, or a single room that is 
occupied (or if vacant, is intended for occupancy) as 
separate living quarters. Separate living quarters are those 
in which the occupants live and eat separately from any 
other persons in the building and which have direct access 
from the outside of the building or through a common hall. 
The occupants may be a single family, one person living 
alone, two or more families living together, or any other 
group of related or unrelated persons who share living 
arrangements. 

In 100-percent tabulations, the count of households or 
householders always equals the count of occupied hous- 
ing units. In sample tabulations, the numbers may differ as 
a result of the weighting process. 

Persons Per Household— A measure obtained by divid- 
ing the number of persons in households by the number of 
households (or householders). In cases where persons in 
households are cross-classified by race or Hispanic origin, 
persons in the household are classified by the race or 
Hispanic origin of the householder rather than the race or 
Hispanic origin of each individual. 

Relationship to Householder 

Householder— The data on relationship to householder 
were derived from answers to questionnaire item 2, which 
was asked of all persons in housing units. One person in 
each household is designated as the householder. In most 
cases, this is the person, or one of the persons, in whose 
name the home is owned, being bought, or rented and who 
is listed in column 1 of the census questionnaire. If there is 
no such person in the household, any adult household 
member 15 years old and over could be designated as the 
householder. 

Households are classified by type according to the sex 
of the householder and the presence of relatives. Two 
types of householders are distinguished: a family house- 
holder and a nonfamily householder. A family householder 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



B-13 



is a householder living with one or more persons related to 
him or her by birth, marriage, or adoption. The householder 
and all persons in the household related to him or her are 
family members. A nonfamily householder is a house- 
holder living alone or with nonrelatives only. 

Spouse— Includes a person married to and living with a 
householder. This category includes persons in formal 
marriages, as well as persons in common-law marriages. 
The number of spouses is equal to the number of 
"married-couple families" or "married-couple households" 
in 100-percent tabulations. The number of spouses, how- 
ever, is generally less than half of the number of "married 
persons with spouse present" in sample tabulations, since 
more than one married couple can live in a household, but 
only spouses of householders are specifically identified as 
"spouse." For sample tabulations, the number of "married 
persons with spouse present" includes married-couple 
subfamilies and married-couple families. 

Child — Includes a son or daughter by birth, a stepchild, or 
adopted child of the householder, regardless of the child's 
age or marital status. The category excludes sons-in-law, 
daughters-in-law, and foster children. 

Natural-Born or Adopted Son/Daughter— A son or daugh- 
ter of the householder by birth, regardless of the age of 
the child. Also, this category includes sons or daughters 
of the householder by legal adoption, regardless of the 
age of the child. If the stepson/stepdaughter of the 
householder has been legally adopted by the house- 
holder, the child is still classified as a stepchild. 

Stepson/ 'Stepdaughter— A son or daughter of the house- 
holder through marriage but not by birth, regardless of 
the age of the child. If the stepson/stepdaughter of the 
householder has been legally adopted by the house- 
holder, the child is still classified as a stepchild. 

Own Child— A never-married child under 18 years who 
is a son or daughter by birth, a stepchild, or an adopted 
child of the householder. In certain tabulations, own 
children are further classified as living with two parents 
or with one parent only. Own children of the house- 
holder living with two parents are by definition found 
only in married-couple families. 

In a subfamily, an "own child" is a never-married 
child under 18 years of age who is a son, daughter, 
stepchild, or an adopted child of a mother in a mother- 
child subfamily, a father in a father-child subfamily, or 
either spouse in a married-couple subfamily. 

"Related children" in a family include own children and 
all other persons under 18 years of age in the household, 
regardless of marital status, who are related to the house- 
holder, except the spouse of the householder, Foster 
children are not included since they are not related to the 
householder. 



Other Relatives— In tabulations, includes any household 
member related to the householder by birth, marriage, or 
adoption, but not included specifically in another relation- 
ship category. In certain detailed tabulations, the following 
categories may be shown: 

Grandchild— The grandson or granddaughter of the 
householder. 

Brother/Sister— -The brother or sister of the house- 
holder, including stepbrothers, stepsisters, and brothers 
and sisters by adoption. Brothers-in-law and sisters-in- 
law are included in the "Other relative" category on the 
questionnaire. 

Parent—The father or mother of the householder, includ- 
ing a stepparent or adoptive parent. Fathers-in-law and 
mothers-in-law are included in the "Other relative" 
category on the questionnaire. 

Other Relatives— Anyone not listed in a reported cate- 
gory above who is related to the householder by birth, 
marriage, or adoption (brother-in-law, grandparent, nephew, 
aunt, mother-in-law, daughter-in-law, cousin, and so 
forth). 

Nonrelatives— Includes any household member, including 
foster children not related to the householder by birth, 
marriage, or adoption. The following categories may be 
presented in more detailed tabulations: 

Roomer, Boarder, or Foster Child— Roomer, boarder, 
lodger, and foster children or foster adults of the 
householder. 

Housemate or Roommate— A person who is not related 
to the householder and who shares living quarters 
primarily in order to share expenses. 

Unmarried Partner— A person who is not related to the 
householder, who shares living quarters, and who has a 
close personal relationship with the householder. 

Other Nonrelatives— A person who is not related by 
birth, marriage, or adoption to the householder and who 
is not described by the categories given above. 

When relationship is not reported for an individual, it is 
imputed according to the responses for age, sex, and 
marital status for that person while maintaining consis- 
tency with responses for other individuals in the house- 
hold. (For more information on imputation, see Appendix 
C, Accuracy of the Data.) 

Unrelated Individual 

An unrelated individual is: (1) a householder living alone 
or with nonrelatives only, (2) a household member who is 
not related to the householder, or (3) a person living in 
group quarters who is not an inmate of an institution. 



B-14 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



Family Type 



Unmarried-Partner Household 



A family consists of a householder and one or more 
other persons living in the same household who are 
related to the householder by birth, marriage, or adoption. 
All persons in a household who are related to the house- 
holder are regarded as members of his or her family. A 
household can contain only one family for purposes of 
census tabulations. Not all households contain families 
since a household may comprise a group of unrelated 
persons or one person living alone. 

Families are classified by type as either a "married- 
couple family" or "other family" according to the sex of the 
householder and the presence of relatives. The data on 
family type are based on answers to questions on sex and 
relationship which were asked on a 100-percent basis. 

Married-Couple Family— A family in which the house- 
holder and his or her spouse are enumerated as mem- 
bers of the same household. 

Other Family: 

Male Householder, No Wife Present— A family with a 
male householder and no spouse of householder present. 

Female Householder, No Husband Present— A family 
with a female householder and no spouse of house- 
holder present. 

Persons Per Family — A measure obtained by dividing the 
number of persons in families by the total number of 
families (or family householders). In cases where the 
measure, "persons in family" or "persons per family" are 
cross-tabulated by race or Hispanic origin, the race or 
Hispanic origin refers to the householder rather than the 
race or Hispanic origin of each individual. 

Subfamily 

A subfamily is a married couple (husband and wife 
enumerated as members of the same household) with or 
without never-married children under 18 years old, or one 
parent with one or more never-married children under 18 
years old, living in a household and related to, but not 
including, either the householder or the householder's 
spouse. The number of subfamilies is not included in the 
count of families, since subfamily members are counted as 
part of the householder's family. 

Subfamilies are defined during processing of sample 
data. In selected tabulations, subfamilies are further clas- 
sified by type: married-couple subfamilies, with or without 
own children; mother-child subfamilies; and father-child 
subfamilies. 

Lone parents include people maintaining either one- 
parent families or one-parent subfamilies. Married couples 
include husbands and wives in both married-couple fami- 
lies and married-couple subfamilies. 

DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



An unmarried-partner household is a household other 
than a "married-couple household" that includes a house- 
holder and an "unmarried partner." An "unmarried part- 
ner" can be of the same sex or of the opposite sex of the 
householder. An "unmarried partner" in an "unmarried- 
partner household" is an adult who is unrelated to the 
householder, but shares living quarters and has a close 
personal relationship with the householder. 

Unmarried-Couple Household 

An unmarried-couple household is composed of two 
unrelated adults of the opposite sex (one of whom is the 
householder) who share a housing unit with or without the 
presence of children under 15 years old. 

Foster Children 

Foster children are nonrelatives of the householder and 
are included in the category, "Roomer, boarder, or foster 
child" on the questionnaire. Foster children are identified 
as persons under 18 years old and living in households 
that have no nonrelatives 1 8 years old and over (who might 
be parents of the nonrelatives under 18 years old). 

Stepfamily 

A stepfamily is a "married-couple family" with at least 
one stepchild of the householder present, where the 
householder is the husband. 

Comparability— The 1990 definition of a household is the 
same as that used in 1 980. The 1 980 relationship category 
"Son/daughter" has been replaced by two categories, 
"Natural-born or adopted son/daughter" and "Stepson/ 
stepdaughter." "Grandchild" has been added as a sepa- 
rate category. The 1980 nonrelative categories: "Roomer, 
boarder" and "Partner, roommate" have been replaced by 
the categories "Roomer, boarder, or foster child," "House- 
mate, roommate," and "Unmarried partner." The 1980 
nonrelative category "Paid employee" has been dropped. 

INCOME IN 1989 

The data on income in 1 989 were derived from answers 
to questionnaire items 32 and 33. Information on money 
income received in the calendar year 1 989 was requested 
from persons 15 years old and over. "Total income" is the 
algebraic sum of the amounts reported separately for 
wage or salary income; net nonfarm self-employment 
income; net farm self-employment income; interest, divi- 
dend, or net rental or royalty income; Social Security or 
railroad retirement income; public assistance or welfare 
income; retirement or disability income; and all other 
income. "Earnings" is defined as the algebraic sum of 

B-15 



lutiuLmaiauf 



wage or salary income and net income from farm and 
nonfarm self-employment. "Earnings" represent the amount 
of income received regularly before deductions for per- 
sonal income taxes, Social Security, bond purchases, 
union dues, medicare deductions, etc. 

Receipts from the following sources are not included as 
income: money received from the sale of property (unless 
the recipient was engaged in the business of selling such 
property); the value of income "in kind" from food stamps, 
public housing subsidies, medical care, employer contribu- 
tions for persons, etc.; withdrawal of bank deposits; money 
borrowed; tax refunds; exchange of money between rela- 
tives living in the same household; gifts and lump-sum 
inheritances, insurance payments, and other types of 
lump-sum receipts. 

Income Type in 1989 

The eight types of income reported in the census are 
defined as follows: 

1. Wage or Salary Income— Includes total money earn- 
ings received for work performed as an employee 
during the calendar year 1989. It includes wages, 
salary, Armed Forces pay, commissions, tips, piece- 
rate payments, and cash bonuses earned before 
deductions were made for taxes, bonds, pensions, 
union dues, etc. 

2. Nonfarm Self-Employment Income— Includes net money 
income (gross receipts minus expenses) from one's 
own business, professional enterprise, or partnership. 
Gross receipts include the value of all goods sold and 
services rendered. Expenses includes costs of goods 
purchased, rent, heat, light, power, depreciation charges, 
wages and salaries paid, business taxes (not personal 
income taxes), etc. 

3. Farm Self-Employment Income— Includes net money 
income (gross receipts minus operating expenses) 
from the operation of a farm by a person on his or her 
own account, as an owner, renter, or sharecropper. 
Gross receipts include the value of all products sold, 
government farm programs, money received from the 
rental of farm equipment to others, and incidental 
receipts from the sale of wood, sand, gravel, etc. 
Operating expenses include cost of feed, fertilizer, 
seed, and other farming supplies, cash wages paid to 
farmhands, depreciation charges, cash rent, interest 
on farm mortgages, farm building repairs, farm taxes 
(not State and Federal personal income taxes), etc. 
The value of fuel, food, or other farm products used for 
family living is not included as part of net income. 

4. Interest, Dividend, or Net Rental Income— Includes 
interest on savings or bonds, dividends from stock- 
holdings or membership in associations, net income 
from rental of property to others and receipts from 
boarders or lodgers, net royalties, and periodic pay- 
ments from an estate or trust fund. 



5. Social Security Income — Includes Social Security pen- 
sions and survivors benefits and permanent disability 
insurance payments made by the Social Security 
Administration prior to deductions for medical insur- 
ance, and railroad retirement insurance checks from 
the U.S. Government. Medicare reimbursements are 
not included. 

6. Public Assistance Income — Includes: (1) supplemen- 
tary security income payments made by Federal or 
State welfare agencies to low income persons who are 
aged (65 years old or over), blind, or disabled; (2) aid 
to families with dependent children, and (3) general 
assistance. Separate payments received for hospital 
or other medical care (vendor payments) are excluded 
from this item. 

7. Retirement or Disability Income — Includes: (1) retire- 
ment pensions and survivor benefits from a former 
employer, labor union, or Federal, State, county, or 
other governmental agency; (2) disability income from 
sources such as worker's compensation; companies 
or unions; Federal, State, or local government; and the 
U.S. military; (3) periodic receipts from annuities and 
insurance; and (4) regular income from IRA and KEOGH 
plans. 

8. All Other Income — Includes unemployment compen- 
sation, Veterans Administration (VA) payments, ali- 
mony and child support, contributions received period- 
ically from persons not living in the household, military 
family allotments, net gambling winnings, and other 
kinds of periodic income other than earnings. 

Income of Households — Includes the income of the 
householder and all other persons 1 5 years old and over in 
the household, whether related to the householder or not. 
Because many households consist of only one person, 
average household income is usually less than average 
family income. 

Income of Families and Persons — In compiling statistics 
on family income, the incomes of all members 1 5 years old 
and over in each family are summed and treated as a 
single amount. However, for persons 15 years old and 
over, the total amounts of their own incomes are used. 
Although the income statistics covered the calendar year 
1 989, the characteristics of persons and the composition 
of families refer to the time of enumeration (April 1990). 
Thus, the income of the family does not include amounts 
received by persons who were members of the family 
during all or part of the calendar year 1 989 if these persons 
no longer resided with the family at the time of enumera- 
tion. Yet, family income amounts reported by related 
persons who did not reside with the family during 1 989 but 
who were members of the family at the time of enumera- 
tion are included. However, the composition of most 
families was the same during 1989 as in April 1990. 

Median Income — The median divides the income distribu- 
tion into two equal parts, one having incomes above the 
median and the other having incomes below the median. 



B-16 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



For households and families, the median income is based 
on the distribution of the total number of units including 
those with no income. The median for persons is based on 
persons with income. The median income values for all 
households, families, and persons are computed on the 
basis of more detailed income intervals than shown in 
most tabulations. Median household or family income 
figures of $50,000 or less are calculated using linear 
interpolation. For persons, corresponding median values 
of $40,000 or less are also computed using linear interpo- 
lation. All other median income amounts are derived 
through Pareto interpolation. (For more information on 
medians and interpolation, see the discussion under "Derived 
Measures.") 

Mean Income — This is the amount obtained by dividing 
the total income of a particular statistical universe by the 
number of units in that universe. Thus, mean household 
income is obtained by dividing total household income by 
the total number of households. For the various types of 
income the means are based on households having those 
types of income. "Per capita income" is the mean income 
computed for every man, woman, and child in a particular 
group. It is derived by dividing the total income of a 
particular group by the total population in that group. 

Care should be exercised in using and interpreting mean 
income values for small subgroups of the population. 
Because the mean is influenced strongly by extreme 
values in the distribution, it is especially susceptible to the 
effects of sampling variability, misreporting, and process- 
ing errors. The median, which is not affected by extreme 
values, is, therefore, a better measure than the mean when 
the population base is small. The mean, nevertheless, is 
shown in some data products for most small subgroups 
because, when weighted according to the number of 
cases, the means can be added to obtained summary 
measures for areas and groups other than those shown in 
census tabulations. 

Limitation of the Data— Since questionnaire entries for 
income frequently are based on memory and not on 
records, many persons tended to forget minor or irregular 
sources of income and, therefore, underreport their income. 
Underreporting tends to be more pronounced for income 
sources that are not derived from earnings, such as Social 
Security, public assistance, or from interest, dividends, and 
net rental income. 

There are errors of reporting due to the misunderstand- 
ing of the income questions such as reporting gross rather 
than net dollar amounts for the two questions on net 
self-employment income, which resulted in an overstate- 
ment of these items. Another common error is the report- 
ing of identical dollar amounts in two of the eight type of 
income items where a respondent with only one source of 
income assumed that the second amount should be 
entered to represent total income. Such instances of 

DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



overreporting had an impact on the level of mean nonfarm 
or farm self-employment income and mean total income 
published for the various geographical subdivisions of the 
State. 

Extensive computer editing procedures were instituted 
in the data processing operation to reduce some of these 
reporting errors and to improve the accuracy of the income 
data. These procedures corrected various reporting defi- 
ciencies and improved the consistency of reported income 
items associated with work experience and information on 
occupation and class of worker. For example, if persons 
reported they were self-employed on their own farm, not 
incorporated, but had reported wage and salary earnings 
only, the latter amount was shifted to net farm self- 
employment income. Also, if any respondent reported total 
income only, the amount was generally assigned to one of 
the type of income items according to responses to the 
work experience and class-of-worker questions. Another 
type of problem involved nonreporting of income data. 
Where income information was not reported, procedures 
were devised to impute appropriate values with either no 
income or positive or negative dollar amounts for the 
missing entries. (For more information on imputation, see 
Appendix C, Accuracy of the Data.) 

In income tabulations for households and families, the 
lowest income group (e.g., less than $5,000) includes units 
that were classified as having no 1 989 income. Many of 
these were living on income "in kind," savings, or gifts, 
were newly created families, or families in which the sole 
breadwinner had recently died or left the household. 
However, many of the households and families who reported 
no income probably had some money income which was 
not recorded in the census. 

The income data presented in the tabulations covers 
money income only. The fact that many farm families 
receive an important part of their income in the form of 
"free" housing and goods produced and consumed on the 
farm rather than in money should be taken into consider- 
ation in comparing the income of farm and nonfarm 
residents. Nonmoney income such as business expense 
accounts, use of business transportation and facilities, or 
partial compensation by business for medical and educa- 
tional expenses was also received by some nonfarm 
residents. Many low income families also receive income 
"in kind" from public welfare programs. In comparing 
income data for 1989 with earlier years, it should be noted 
that an increase or decrease in money income does not 
necessarily represent a comparable change in real income, 
unless adjustments for changes in prices are made. 

Comparability— The income data collected in the 1980 
and 1970 censuses are similar to the 1990 census data, 
but there are variations in the detail of the questions. In 
1980, income information for 1979 was collected from 
persons in approximately 19 percent of all housing units 
and group quarters. Each person was required to report: 



Wage or salary income 



B-17 



■JLUUJ.BHB1BIIM1M 



• Net nonfarm self-employment income 

• Net farm self-employment income 

• Interest, dividend, or net rental or royalty income 

• Social Security income 

• Public assistance income 

• Income from all other sources 

Between the 1980 and 1990 censuses, there were 
minor differences in the processing of the data. In both 
censuses, all persons with missing values in one or more 
of the detailed type of income items and total income were 
designated as allocated. Each missing entry was imputed 
either as a "no" or as a dollar amount. If total income was 
reported and one or more of the type of income fields was 
not answered, then the entry in total income generally was 
assigned to one of the income types according to the 
socioeconomic characteristics of the income recipient. 
This person was designated as unallocated. 

In 1980 and 1990, all nonrespondents with income not 
reported (whether heads of households or other persons) 
were assigned the reported income of persons with similar 
characteristics. (For more information on imputation, see 
Appendix C, "Accuracy of the Data.") 

There was a difference in the method of computer 
derivation of aggregate income from individual amounts 
between the two census processing operations. In the 
1980 census, income amounts less than $100,000 were 
coded in tens of dollars, and amounts of $100,000 or more 
were coded in thousands of dollars; $5 was added to each 
amount coded in tens of dollars and $500 to each amount 
coded in thousands of dollars. Entries of $999,000 or more 
were treated as $999,500 and losses of $9,999 or more 
were treated as minus $9,999. In the 1990 census, income 
amounts less than $999,999 were keyed in dollars. Amounts 
of $999,999 or more were treated as $999,999 and losses 
of $9,999 or more were treated as minus $9,999 in all of 
the computer derivations of aggregate income. 

In 1970, information on income in 1969 was obtained 
from all members in every fifth housing unit and small 
group quarters (less than 15 persons) and every fifth 
person in all other group quarters. Each person was 
required to report: 

• Wage or salary income 

• Net nonfarm self-employment income 

• Net farm self-employment income 

• Social Security or Railroad Retirement 

• Public assistance or welfare payments 

• Income from all other sources 



If a person reported a dollar amount in wage or salary, 
net nonfarm self-employment income, or net farm self- 
employment income, the person was considered as unal- 
located only if no further dollar amounts were imputed for 
any additional missing entries. 

In 1960, data on income were obtained from all mem- 
bers in every fourth housing unit and from every fourth 
person 14 years old and over living in group quarters. Each 
person was required to report wage or salary income, net 
self-employment income, and income other than earnings 
received in 1959. An assumption was made in the editing 
process that no other type of income was received by a 
person who reported the receipt of either wage and salary 
income or self-employment but who had failed to report the 
receipt of other money income. 

For several reasons, the income data shown in census 
tabulations are not directly comparable with those that 
may be obtained from statistical summaries of income tax 
returns. Income, as defined for Federal tax purposes, 
differs somewhat from the Census Bureau concept. More- 
over, the coverage of income tax statistics is different 
because of the exemptions of persons having small amounts 
of income and the inclusion of net capital gains in tax 
returns. Furthermore, members of some families file sep- 
arate returns and others file joint returns; consequently, 
the income reporting unit is not consistently either a family 
or a person. 

The earnings data shown in census tabulations are not 
directly comparable with earnings records of the Social 
Security Administration. The earnings record data for 1989 
excluded the earnings of most civilian government employ- 
ees, some employees of nonprofit organizations, workers 
covered by the Railroad Retirement Act, and persons not 
covered by the program because of insufficient earnings. 
Furthermore, earnings received from any one employer in 
excess of $48,000 in 1989 are not covered by earnings 
records. Finally, because census data are obtained from 
household questionnaires, they may differ from Social 
Security Administration earnings record data, which are 
based upon employers' reports and the Federal income 
tax returns of self-employed persons. 

The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) of the Depart- 
ment of Commerce publishes annual data on aggregate 
and per-capita personal income received by the population 
for States, metropolitan areas, and selected counties. 
Aggregate income estimates based on the income statis- 
tics shown in census products usually would be less than 
those shown in the BEA income series for several reasons. 
The Census Bureau data are obtained directly from house- 
holds, whereas the BEA income series is estimated largely 
on the basis of data from administrative records of busi- 
ness and governmental sources. Moreover, the definitions 
of income are different. The BEA income series includes 
some items not included in the income data shown in 
census publications, such as income "in kind," income 
received by nonprofit institutions, the value of services of 



B-18 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



banks and other financial intermediaries rendered to per- 
sons without the assessment of specific charges, Medi- 
care payments, and the income of persons who died or 
emigrated prior to April 1, 1990. On the other hand, the 
census income data include contributions for support 
received from persons not residing in the same household 
and employer contributions for social insurance. 



INDUSTRY, OCCUPATION, AND CLASS OF 
WORKER 

The data on industry, occupation, and class of worker 
were derived from answers to questionnaire items 28, 29, 
and 30 respectively. These questions were asked of a 
sample of persons. Information on industry relates to the 
kind of business conducted by a person's employing 
organization; occupation describes the kind of work the 
person does on the job. 

For employed persons, the data refer to the person's 
job during the reference week. For those who worked at 
two or more jobs, the data refer to the job at which the 
person worked the greatest number of hours. For unem- 
ployed persons, the data refer to their last job. The industry 
and occupation statistics are derived from the detailed 
classification systems developed for the 1990 census as 
described below. The Classified Index of Industries and 
Occupations provided additional information on the indus- 
try and occupation classification systems. 

Respondents provided the data for the tabulations by 
writing on the questionnaires descriptions of their industry 
and occupation. These descriptions were keyed and passed 
through automated coding software which assigned a 
portion of the written entries to categories in the classifi- 
cation system. The automated system assigned codes to 
59 percent of the industry entries and 38 percent of the 
occupation entries. 

Those cases not coded by the computer were referred 
to clerical staff in the Census Bureau's Kansas City 
processing office for coding. The clerical staff converted 
the written questionnaire descriptions to codes by compar- 
ing these descriptions to entries in the Alphabetical Index 
of Industries and Occupations. For the industry code, 
these coders also referred to an Employer Name List 
(formerly called Company Name List). This list, prepared 
from the Standard Statistical Establishment List developed 
by the Census Bureau for the economic censuses and 
surveys, contained the names of business establishments 
and their Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) codes 
converted to population census equivalents. This list facil- 
itated coding and maintained industrial classification com- 
parability. 

Industry 

The industry classification system developed for the 
1990 census consists of 236 categories for employed 
persons, classified into 13 major industry groups. Since 

DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



1940, the industrial classification has been based on the 
Standard Industrial Classification Manual (SIC). The 1990 
census classification was developed from the 1987 SIC 
published by the Office of Management and Budget, 
Executive Office of the President. 

The SIC was designed primarily to classify establish- 
ments by the type of industrial activity in which they were 
engaged. However, census data, which were collected 
from households, differ in detail and nature from those 
obtained from establishment surveys. Therefore, the cen- 
sus classification systems, while defined in SIC terms, 
cannot reflect the full detail in all categories. There are 
several levels of industrial classification found in census 
products. For example, the 1 990 CP-2, Social and Eco- 
nomic Characteristics report includes 41 unique industrial 
categories, while the 1990 Summary Tape File 4 (STF 4) 
presents 72 categories. 

Occupation 

The occupational classification system developed for 
the 1990 census consists of 501 specific occupational 
categories for employed persons arranged into 6 summary 
and 13 major occupational groups. This classification was 
developed to be consistent with the Standard Occupa- 
tional Classification (SOC) Manual: 1980, published by the 
Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards, U.S. 
Department of Commerce. Tabulations with occupation as 
the primary characteristic present several levels of occu- 
pational detail. The most detailed tabulations are shown in 
a special 1990 subject report and tape files on occupation. 
These products contain all 501 occupational categories 
plus industry or class of worker subgroupings of occupa- 
tional categories. 

Some occupation groups are related closely to certain 
industries. Operators of transportation equipment, farm 
operators and workers, and private household workers 
account for major portions of their respective industries of 
transportation, agriculture, and private households. How- 
ever, the industry categories include persons in other 
occupations. For example, persons employed in agricul- 
ture include truck drivers and bookkeepers; persons employed 
in the transportation industry include mechanics, freight 
handlers, and payroll clerks; and persons employed in the 
private household industry include occupations such as 
chauffeur, gardener, and secretary. 

Class of Worker 

The data on class of worker were derived from answers 
to questionnaire item 30. The information on class of 
worker refers to the same job as a respondent's industry 
and occupation and categorizes persons according to the 
type of ownership of the employing organization. The class 
of worker categories are defined as follows: 

Private Wage and Salary Workers— Includes persons 
who worked for wages, salary, commission, tips, pay-in- 
kind, or piece rates for a private for profit employer or a 

B-19 



private not-for-profit, tax-exempt or charitable organiza- 
tion. Self-employed persons whose business was incorpo- 
rated are included with private wage and salary workers 
because they are paid employees of their own companies. 
Some tabulations present data separately for these sub- 
categories: "For profit," "Not for profit," and "Own busi- 
ness incorporated." 

Employees of foreign governments, the United Nations, 
or other formal international organizations were classified 
as "Private-not-for-profit." 

Government Workers — Includes persons who were employ- 
ees of any local, State, or Federal governmental unit, 
regardless of the activity of the particular agency. For 
some tabulations, the data were presented separately for 
the three levels of government. 

Self-Employed Workers— Includes persons who worked 
for profit or fees in their own unincorporated business, 
profession, or trade, or who operated a farm. 

Unpaid Family Workers— Includes persons who worked 
15 hours or more without pay in a business or on a farm 
operated by a relative. 

Salaried/Self-Employed— In tabulations that categorize 
persons as either salaried or self-employed, the salaried 
category includes private and government wage and salary 
workers; self-employed includes self-employed persons 
and unpaid family workers. 

The industry category, "Public administration," is limited 
to regular government functions such as legislative, judi- 
cial, administrative, and regulatory activities of govern- 
ments. Other government organizations such as schools, 
hospitals, liquor stores, and bus lines are classified by 
industry according to the activity in which they are engaged. 
On the other hand, the class of worker government 
categories include all government workers. 

Occasionally respondents supplied industry, occupa- 
tion, or class of worker descriptions which were not 
sufficiently specific for precise classification or did not 
report on these items at all. Some of these cases were 
corrected through the field editing process and during the 
coding and tabulation operations. In the coding operation, 
certain types of incomplete entries were corrected using 
the Alphabetical Index of Industries and Occupations. For 
example, it was possible in certain situations to assign an 
industry code based on the occupation reported. 

Following the coding operations, there was a computer 
edit and an allocation process. The edit first determined 
whether a respondent was in the universe which required 
an industry and occupation code. The codes for the three 
items (industry, occupation, and class of worker) were 
checked to ensure they were valid and were edited for their 
relation to each other. Invalid and inconsistent codes were 
either blanked or changed to a consistent code. 



If one or more of the three codes were blank after the 
edit, a code was assigned from a "similar" person based 
on other items such as age, sex, education, farm or 
nonfarm residence, and weeks worked. If all the labor 
force and income data also were blank, all these economic 
items were assigned from one other person who provided 
all the necessary data. 

Comparability — Comparability of industry and occupation 
data was affected by a number of factors, primarily the 
systems used to classify the questionnaire responses. For 
both the industry and occupation classification systems, 
the basic structures were generally the same from 1940 to 
1970, but changes in the individual categories limited 
comparability of the data from one census to another. 
These changes were needed to recognize the "birth" of 
new industries and occupations, the "death" of others, 
and the growth and decline in existing industries and 
occupations, as well as, the desire of analysts and other 
users for more detail in the presentation of the data. 
Probably the greatest cause of incomparability is the 
movement of a segment of a category to a different 
category in the next census. Changes in the nature of jobs 
and respondent terminology, and refinement of category 
composition made these movements necessary. 

In the 1990 census, the industry classification had minor 
revisions to reflect recent changes to the SIC. The 1990 
occupational classification system is essentially the same 
as that for the 1980 census. However, the conversion of 
the census classification to the SOC in 1980 meant that 
the 1990 classification system was less comparable to the 
classifications used prior to the 1980 census. 

Other factors that affected data comparability included 
the universe to which the data referred (in 1970, the age 
cutoff for labor force was changed from 14 years to 16 
years); how the industry and occupation questions were 
worded on the questionnaire (for example, important changes 
were made in 1970); improvements in the coding proce- 
dures (the Employer Name List technique was introduced 
in 1960); and how the "not reported" cases are handled. 
Prior to 1970, they were placed in the residual categories, 
"Industry not reported" and "Occupation not reported." In 
1970, an allocation process was introduced that assigned 
these cases to major groups. In 1990, as in 1980, the "Not 
reported" cases were assigned to individual categories. 
Therefore, the 1 980 and 1 990 data for individual catego- 
ries included some numbers of persons who were tabu- 
lated in a "Not reported" category in previous censuses. 

The following publications contain information on the 
various factors affecting comparability and are particularly 
useful for understanding differences in the occupation and 
industry information from earlier censuses: U.S. Bureau of 
the Census, Changes Between the 1950 and 1960 Occu- 
pation and Industry Classifications With Detailed Adjust- 
ments of 1950 Data to the 1960 Classifications, Technical 
Paper No. 18, 1968; U.S. Bureau of the Census, 1970 
Occupation and Industry Classification Systems in Terms 
of their 1960 Occupation and Industry Elements, Technical 



B-20 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



Paper No. 26, 1972; and U.S. Bureau of the Census, The 
Relationship Between the 1970 and 1980 Industry and 
Occupation Classification Systems, Technical Paper No. 
59, 1988. For citations for earlier census years, see the 
1980 Census of Population report, PC80-1-D, Detailed 
Population Characteristics. 

The 1990 census introduced an additional class of 
worker category for "private not-for-profit" employers. This 
category is a subset of the 1980 category "employee of 
private employer" so there is no comparable data before 
1990. Also in 1990, employees of foreign governments, 
the United Nations, etc., are classified as "private not-for- 
profit," rather than Federal Government as in 1970 and 
1 980. While in theory, there was a change in comparability, 
in practice, the small number of U.S. residents working for 
foreign governments made this change negligible. 

Comparability between the statistics on industry and 
occupation from the 1 990 census and statistics from other 
sources is affected by many of the factors described in the 
section on "Employment Status." These factors are pri- 
marily geographic differences between residence and place 
of work, different dates of reference, and differences in 
counts because of dual job holding. Industry data from 
population censuses cover all industries and all kinds of 
workers, whereas, data from establishments often excluded 
private household workers, government workers, and the 
self-employed. Also, the replies from household respon- 
dents may have differed in detail and nature from those 
obtained from establishments. 

Occupation data from the census and data from gov- 
ernment licensing agencies, professional associations, trade 
unions, etc., may not be as comparable as expected. 
Organizational listings often include persons not in the 
labor force or persons devoting all or most of their time to 
another occupation; or the same person may be included 
in two or more different listings. In addition, relatively few 
organizations, except for those requiring licensing, attained 
complete coverage of membership in a particular occupa- 
tional field. 

JOURNEY TO WORK 
Place of Work 

The data on place of work were derived from answers to 
questionnaire item 22, which was asked of persons who 
indicated in question 21 that they worked at some time 
during the reference week. (For more information, see 
discussion under "Reference Week.") 

Data were tabulated for workers 1 6 years and over; that 
is, members of the Armed Forces and civilians who were at 
work during the reference week. Data on place of work 
refer to the geographic location at which workers carried 
out their occupational activities during the reference week. 
The exact address (number and street) of the place of 
work was asked, as well as the place (city, town, or post 
office); whether or not the place of work was inside or 



outside the limits of that city or town; and the county, State, 
and ZIP Code. If the person's employer operated in more 
than one location, the exact address of the location or 
branch where the respondent worked was requested. 
When the number and street name were unknown, a 
description of the location, such as the building name or 
nearest street or intersection, was to be entered. 

Persons who worked at more than one location during 
the reference week were asked to report the one at which 
they worked the greatest number of hours. Persons who 
regularly worked in several locations each day during the 
reference week were requested to give the address at 
which they began work each day. For cases in which daily 
work did not begin at a central place each day, the person 
was asked to provide as much information as possible to 
describe the area in which he or she worked most during 
the reference week. 

In some tabulations, place-of-work locations may be 
defined as "in area of residence" and "outside area of 
residence." The area of residence may vary from table to 
table or even within a table, and refers to the particular 
area or areas shown. For example, in a table that provides 
data for counties, "in area of residence" refers to persons 
who worked in the same county in which they lived, while 
"outside area of residence" refers to persons whose 
workplace was located in a county different from the one in 
which they lived. Similarly, in a table that provides data for 
several types of areas, such as the State and its individual 
metropolitan areas (MA's), counties, and places, the place- 
of-work data will be variable and is determined by the 
geographic level (State, MA, county, or place) shown in 
each section of the tabulation. 

In tabulations that present data for States, workplaces 
for the residents of the State may include, in addition to the 
State itself, each contiguous State. The category, "in 
noncontiguous State or abroad," includes persons who 
worked in a State that did not border their State of 
residence as well as persons who worked outside the 
United States. 

In tabulations that present data for an MSA/PMSA, 
place-of-work locations are specified to show the main 
destinations of workers living in the MSA/PMSA. (For 
more information on metropolitan areas (MA's), see Appen- 
dix A, Area Classifications.) All place-of-work locations are 
identified with respect to the boundaries of the MSA/PMSA 
as "inside MSA/PMSA" or "outside MSA/PMSA." Loca- 
tions within the MSA/PMSA are further divided into each 
central city, and each county or county balance. Selected 
large incorporated places also may be specified as places 
of work. 

Within New England MSA/PMSA's, the places of work 
presented generally are cities and towns. Locations out- 
side the MSA/PMSA are specified if they are important 
commuting destinations for residents of the MSA/PMSA, 
and may include adjoining MSA/PMSA's and their central 
cities, their component counties, large incorporated places, 
or counties, cities, or other geographic areas outside any 
MA. In tabulations for MSA/PMSA's in New England; 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



B-21 



Honolulu, Hawaii; and certain other MA's, some place-of- 
work locations are identified as "areas" (e.g., Area 1, Area 
5, Area 12, etc.). Such areas consist of groups of towns, 
cities, census designated places (Honolulu MSA only), or 
counties that have been identified as unique place-of-work 
destinations. When an adjoining MSA/PMSA or MSA/PMSA 
remainder is specified as a place-of-work location, its 
components are not defined. However, the components 
are presented in the 1990 CP-1, General Population Char- 
acteristics for Metropolitan Areas and the 1990 CH-1, 
General Housing Characteristics for Metropolitan Areas 
reports. In tabulations that present data for census tracts 
outside MA's, place-of-work locations are defined as "in 
county of residence" and "outside county of residence." 

In areas where the workplace address was coded to the 
block level, persons were tabulated as working inside or 
outside a specific place based on the location of that 
address, regardless of the response to question 22c 
concerning city/town limits. In areas where it was impos- 
sible to code the workplace address to the block level, 
persons were tabulated as working in a place if a place 
name was reported in question 22b and the response to 
question 22c was either "Yes" or the item was left blank. 
In selected areas, census designated places (CDP's) may 
appear in the tabulations as places of work. The accuracy 
of place-of-work data for CDP's may be affected by the 
extent to which their census names were familiar to 
respondents, and by coding problems caused by similari- 
ties between the CDP name and the names of other 
geographic jurisdictions in the same vicinity. 

Place-of-work data are given for selected minor civil 
divisions (generally, cities, towns, and townships) in the 
nine Northeastern States, based on the responses to the 
place-of-work question. Many towns and townships are 
regarded locally as equivalent to a place and therefore, 
were reported as the place of work. When a respondent 
reported a locality or incorporated place that formed a part 
of a township or town, the coding and tabulating procedure 
was designed to include the response in the total for the 
township or town. The accuracy of the place-of-work data 
for minor civil divisions is greatest for the New England 
States. However, the data for some New England towns, 
for towns in New York, and for townships in New Jersey 
and Pennsylvania may be affected by coding problems 
that resulted from the unfamiliarity of the respondent with 
the minor civil division in which the workplace was located 
or when a township and a city or borough of the same or 
similar name are located close together. 

Place-of-work data may show a few workers who made 
unlikely daily work trips (e.g., workers who lived in New 
York and worked in California). This result is attributable to 
persons who worked during the reference week at a 
location that was different from their usual place of work, 
such as persons away from home on business. 

Comparability— The wording of the question on place of 
work was substantially the same in the 1990 census as it 
was in 1980. However, data on place of work from' the 



1990 census are based on the full census sample, while 
data from the 1980 census were based on only about 
one-half of the full sample. 

For the 1 980 census, nonresponse or incomplete responses 
to the place-of-work question were not allocated, resulting 
in the use of "not reported" categories in the 1980 
publications. However, for the 1990 census, when place of 
work was not reported or the response was incomplete, a 
work location was allocated to the person based on their 
means of transportation to work, travel time to work, 
industry, and location of residence and workplace of 
others. The 1990 publications, therefore, do not contain a 
"not reported" category for the place-of-work data. 

Comparisons between 1980 and 1990 census data on 
the gross number of workers in particular commuting flows, 
or the total number of persons working in an area, should 
be made with extreme caution. Any apparent increase in 
the magnitude of the gross numbers may be due solely to 
the fact that for 1990 the "not reported" cases have been 
distributed among specific place-of-work destinations, instead 
of tallied in a separate category as in 1980. 

Limitation of the Data— The data on place of work relate 
to a reference week; that is, the calendar week preceding 
the date on which the respondents completed their ques- 
tionnaires or were interviewed by enumerators. This week 
is not the same for all respondents because the enumer- 
ation was not completed in 1 week. However, for the 
majority of persons, the reference week for the 1990 
census is the last week in March 1990. The lack of a 
uniform reference week means that the place-of-work data 
reported in the census will not exactly match the distribu- 
tion of workplace locations observed or measured during 
an actual workweek. 

The place-of-work data are estimates of persons 16 
years old and over who were both employed and at work 
during the reference week (including persons in the Armed 
Forces). Persons who did not work during the reference 
week but had jobs or businesses from which they were 
temporarily absent due to illness, bad weather, industrial 
dispute, vacation, or other personal reasons are not included 
in the place-of-work data. Therefore, the data on place of 
work understate the total number of jobs or total employ- 
ment in a geographic area during the reference week. It 
also should be noted that persons who had irregular, 
casual, or unstructured jobs during the reference week 
may have erroneously reported themselves as not work- 
ing. 

The address where the individual worked most often 
during the reference week was recorded on the census 
questionnaire. If a worker held two jobs, only data about 
the primary job (the one worked the greatest number of 
hours during the preceding week) was requested. Persons 
who regularly worked in several locations during the refer- 
ence week were requested to give the address at which 
they began work each day. For cases in which daily work 
was not begun at a central place each day, the person was 



B-22 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



asked to provide as much information as possible to 
describe the area in which he or she worked most during 
the reference week. 

Means of Transportation to Work 

The data on means of transportation to work were 
derived from answers to questionnaire item 23a, which 
was asked of persons who indicated in question 21 that 
they worked at some time during the reference week. (For 
more information, see discussion under "Reference Week.") 
Means of transportation to work refers to the principal 
mode of travel or type of conveyance that the person 
usually used to get from home to work during the reference 
week. 

Persons who used different means of transportation on 
different days of the week were asked to specify the one 
they used most often, that is, the greatest number of days. 
Persons who used more than one means of transportation 
to get to work each day were asked to report the one used 
for the longest distance during the work trip. The category, 
"Car, truck, or van," includes workers using a car (includ- 
ing company cars but excluding taxicabs), a truck of 
one-ton capacity or less, or a van. The category, "Public 
transportation," includes workers who used a bus or trolley 
bus, streetcar or trolley car, subway or elevated, railroad, 
ferryboat, or taxicab even if each mode is not shown 
separately in the tabulation. The category, "Other means," 
includes workers who used a mode of travel which is not 
identified separately within the data distribution. The cate- 
gory, "Other means," may vary from table to table, depend- 
ing on the amount of detail shown in a particular distribu- 
tion. 

The means of transportation data for some areas may 
show workers using modes of public transportation that 
are not available in those areas (e.g., subway or elevated 
riders in an MA where there actually is no subway or 
elevated service). This result is largely due to persons who 
worked during the reference week at a location that was 
different from their usual place of work (such as persons 
away from home on business in an area where subway 
service was available) and persons who used more than 
one means of transportation each day but whose principal 
means was unavailable where they lived (for example, 
residents of nonmetropolitan areas who drove to the fringe 
of an MA and took the commuter railroad most of the 
distance to work). 

Private Vehicle Occupancy 

The data on private vehicle occupancy were derived 
from answers to questionnaire item 23b. This question was 
asked of persons who indicated in question 21 that they 
worked at some time during the reference week and who 
reported in question 23a that their means of transportation 
to work was "Car, truck, or van." (For more information, 
see discussion under "Reference Week.") 



Private vehicle occupancy refers to the number of 
persons who usually rode to work in the vehicle during the 
reference week. The category, "Drove alone," includes 
persons who usually drove alone to work as well as 
persons who were driven to work by someone who then 
drove back home or to a nonwork destination. The cate- 
gory, "Carpooled," includes workers who reported that two 
or more persons usually rode to work in the vehicle during 
the reference week. 

Persons Per Car, Truck, or Van— This is obtained by 
dividing the number of persons who reported using a car, 
truck, or van to get to work by the number of such vehicles 
that they used. The number of vehicles used is derived by 
counting each person who drove alone as one vehicle, 
each person who reported being in a two-person carpool 
as one-half vehicle, each person who reported being in a 
three-person carpool as one-third vehicle, and so on, and 
then summing all the vehicles. 

Time Leaving Home to Go to Work 

The data on time leaving home to go to work were 
derived from answers to questionnaire item 24a. This 
question was asked of persons who indicated in question 
21 that they worked at some time during the reference 
week and who reported in question 23a that they worked 
outside their home. The departure time refers to the time of 
day that the person usually left home to go to work during 
the reference week. (For more information, see discussion 
under "Reference Week.") 

Travel Time to Work 

The data on travel time to work were derived from 
answers to questionnaire item 24b. This question was 
asked of persons who indicated in question 21 that they 
worked at some time during the reference week and who 
reported in question 23a that they worked outside their 
home. Travel time to work refers to the total number of 
minutes that it usually took the person to get from home to 
work during the reference week. The elapsed time includes 
time spent waiting for public transportation, picking up 
passengers in carpools, and time spent in other activities 
related to getting to work. (For more information, see 
discussion under "Reference Week.") 

LANGUAGE SPOKEN AT HOME AND ABILITY 
TO SPEAK ENGLISH 

Language Spoken at Home 

Data on language spoken at home were derived from 
the answers to questionnaire items 15a and 15b, which 
were asked of a sample of persons born before April 1, 
1985. Instructions mailed with the 1990 census question- 
naire stated that a respondent should mark "Yes" in 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



B-23 



question 15a if the person sometimes or always spoke a 
language other than English at home and should not mark 
"Yes" if a language was spoken only at school or if 
speaking was limited to a few expressions or slang. For 
question 15b, respondents were instructed to print the 
name of the non-English language spoken at home. If the 
person spoke more than one language other than English, 
the person was to report the language spoken more often 
or the language learned first. 

The cover of the census questionnaire included infor- 
mation in Spanish which provided a telephone number for 
respondents to call to request a census questionnaire and 
instructions in Spanish. Instruction guides were also avail- 
able in 32 other languages to assist enumerators who 
encountered households or respondents who spoke no 
English. 

Questions 1 5a and 1 5b referred to languages spoken at 
home in an effort to measure the current use of languages 
other than English. Persons who knew languages other 
than English but did not use them at home or who only 
used them elsewhere were excluded. Persons who reported 
speaking a language other than English at home may also 
speak English; however, the questions did not permit 
determination of the main or dominant language of per- 
sons who spoke both English and another language. (For 
more information, see discussion below on "Ability to 
Speak English.") 

For persons who indicated that they spoke a language 
other than English at home in question 15a, but failed to 
specify the name of the language in question 15b, the 
language was assigned based on the language of other 
speakers in the household; on the language of a person of 
the same Spanish origin or detailed race group living in the 
same or a nearby area; or on a person of the same 
ancestry or place of birth. In all cases where a person was 
assigned a non-English language, it was assumed that the 
language was spoken at home. Persons for whom the 
name of a language other than English was entered in 
question 15b, and for whom question 15a was blank were 
assumed to speak that language at home. 

The write-in responses listed in question 1 5b (specific 
language spoken) were transcribed onto computer files 
and coded into more than 380 detailed language catego- 
ries using an automated coding system. The automated 
procedure compared write-in responses reported by respon- 
dents with entries in a computer dictionary, which initially 
contained approximately 2,000 language names. The dic- 
tionary was updated with a large number of new names, 
variations in spelling, and a small number of residual 
categories. Each write-in response was given a numeric 
code that was associated with one of the detailed catego- 
ries in the dictionary. If the respondent listed more than 
one non-English language, only the first was coded. 

The write-in responses represented the names people 
used for languages they speak. They may not match the 
names or categories used by linguists. The sets of cate- 
gories used are sometimes geographic and sometimes 
linguistic. Figure 1 provides an illustration of the content of 



the classification schemes used to present language data. 
For more information, write to the Chief, Population Divi- 
sion, U.S. Bureau of the Census, Washington, DC 20233. 

Household Language — In households where one or more 
persons (age 5 years old or over) speak a language other 
than English, the household language assigned to all 
household members is the non-English language spoken 
by the first person with a non-English language in the 
following order: householder, spouse, parent, sibling, child, 
grandchild, other relative, stepchild, unmarried partner, 
housemate or roommate, roomer, boarder, or foster child, 
or other nonrelative. Thus, persons who speak only English 
may have a non-English household language assigned to 
them in tabulations of persons by household language. 



Figure 1 . Four- and Twenty-Five-Group Classifications of 
1990 Census Languages Spoken at Home with 
Illustrative Examples 



Four-Group 


Twenty-Five-Group 




Classification 


Classification 


Examples 


Spanish 


Spanish 


Spanish, Ladino 


Other Indo- 


French 


French, Cajun, 


European 


Italian 
Portuguese 
German 
Yiddish 


French Creole 




Other West 


Afrikaans, Dutch, 




Germanic 


Pennsylvania Dutch 




Scandanavian 


Danish, Norwegian, 
Swedish 




Polish 






Russian 






South Slavic 


Serbocroatian, 
Bulgarian, Macedonian, 
Slovene 




Other Slavic 


Czech, Slovak, 
Ukranian 




Greek 






Indie 


Hindi, Bengali, 
Gujarathi, Punjabi, 
Romany, Sinhalese 




Other Indo- 


Armenian, Gaelic, 




European, not 


Lithuanian, Persian 




elsewhere 






classified 




Languages of 


Chinese 




Asia and the 


Japanese 




Pacific 


Mon-Khmer 
Tagalog 
Korean 
Vietnamese 


Cambodian 




Other languages 


Chamorro, Dravidian 




(part) 


Languages, Hawaiian, 
llocano, Thai, Turkish 


All other lan- 


Arabic 




guages 


Hungarian 
Native North 
American languages 






Other languages 


Amharic, Syriac, 




(part) 


Finnish, Hebrew, 
Languages of 
Central and South 
America, Other 
Languages of Africa 



B-24 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



Ability to Speak English 

Persons 5 years old and over who reported that they 
spoke a language other than English in question 15a were 
also asked in question 1 5c to indicate their ability to speak 
English based on one of the following categories: "Very 
well," "Well," "Not well," or "Not at all." 

The data on ability to speak English represent the 
person's own perception about his or her own ability or, 
because census questionnaires are usually completed by 
one household member, the responses may represent the 
perception of another household member. The instruction 
guides and questionnaires that were mailed to households 
did not include any information on how to interpret the 
response categories in question 15c. 

Persons who reported that they spoke a language other 
than English at home but whose ability to speak English 
was not reported, were assigned the English-language 
ability of a randomly selected person of the same age, 
Spanish origin, nativity and year of entry, and language 
group. 

Linguistic Isolation— A household in which no person 
age 14 years or over speaks only English and no person 
age 14 years or over who speaks a language other than 
English speaks English "Very well" is classified as "lin- 
guistically isolated." All the members of a linguistically 
isolated household are tabulated as linguistically isolated, 
including members under age 14 years who may speak 
only English. 

Limitation of the Data— Persons who speak a language 
other than English at home may have first learned that 
language at school. However, these persons would be 
expected to indicate that they spoke English "Very well." 
Persons who speak a language other than English, but do 
not do so at home, should have been reported as not 
speaking a language other than English at home. 

The extreme detail in which language names were 
coded may give a false impression of the linguistic preci- 
sion of these data. The names used by speakers of a 
language to identify it may reflect ethnic, geographic, or 
political affiliations and do not necessarily respect linguis- 
tic distinctions. The categories shown in the tabulations 
were chosen on a number of criteria, such as information 
about the number of speakers of each language that might 
be expected in a sample of the United States population. 

Comparability— Information on language has been col- 
lected in every census since 1890. The comparability of 
data among censuses is limited by changes in question 
wording, by the subpopulations to whom the question was 
addressed, and by the detail that was published. 

The same question on language was asked in the 1980 
and 1990 censuses. This question on the current language 
spoken at home replaced the questions asked in prior 



censuses on mother tongue; that is, the language other 
than English spoken in the person's home when he or she 
was a child; one's first language; or the language spoken 
before immigrating to the United States. The censuses of 
1910-1940, 1960 and 1970 included questions on mother 
tongue. A change in coding procedure from 1980 to 1990 
should have improved accuracy of coding and may affect 
the number of persons reported in some of the 380 plus 
categories. It should not greatly affect the 4-group or 25- 
group lists. In 1980, coding clerks supplied numeric codes 
for the written entries on each questionnaire using a 2,000 
name reference list. In 1990 written entries were tran- 
scribed to a computer file and matched to a computer 
dictionary which began with the 2,000 name list, but 
expanded as unmatched names were referred to head- 
quarters specialists for resolution. 

The question on ability to speak English was asked for 
the first time in 1980. In tabulations from 1980, the 
categories "Very well" and "Well" were combined. Data 
from other surveys suggested a major difference between 
the category "Very well" and the remaining categories. In 
tabulations showing ability to speak English, persons who 
reported that they spoke English "Very well" are pre- 
sented separately from persons who reported their ability 
to speak English as less than "Very well." 

MARITAL STATUS 

The data on marital status were derived from answers to 
questionnaire item 6, which was asked of all persons. The 
marital status classification refers to the status at the time 
of enumeration. Data on marital status are tabulated only 
for persons 15 years old and over. 

All persons were asked whether they were "now mar- 
ried," "widowed," "divorced," "separated," or "never mar- 
ried." Couples who live together (unmarried persons, 
persons in common-law marriages) were allowed to report 
the marital status they considered the most appropriate. 

Never Married— Includes all persons who have never 
been married, including persons whose only marriage(s) 
was annulled. 

Ever Married— Includes persons married at the time of 
enumeration (including those separated), widowed, or divorced. 

Now Married, Except Separated — Includes persons whose 
current marriage has not ended through widowhood, divorce, 
or separation (regardless of previous marital history). The 
category may also include couples who live together or 
persons in common-law marriages if they consider this 
category the most appropriate. In certain tabulations, 
currently married persons are further classified as "spouse 
present" or "spouse absent." 

Separated — Includes persons legally separated or other- 
wise absent from their spouse because of marital discord. 
Included are persons who have been deserted or who 
have parted because they no longer want to live together 
but who have not obtained a divorce. 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



B-25 



Widowed — Includes widows and widowers who have not 
remarried. 

Divorced— Includes persons who are legally divorced and 
who have not remarried. 

In selected sample tabulations, data for married and 
separated persons are reorganized and combined with 
information on the presence of the spouse in the same 
household. 

Now Married— All persons whose current marriage has 
not ended by widowhood or divorce. This category includes 
persons defined above as "separated." 

Spouse Present— Married persons whose wife or hus- 
band was enumerated as a member of the same 
household, including those whose spouse may have 
been temporarily absent for such reasons as travel or 
hospitalization. 

Spouse Absent— Married persons whose wife or hus- 
band was not enumerated as a member of the same 
household. This category also includes all married per- 
sons living in group quarters. 

Separated— Defined above. 

Spouse Absent, Other — Married persons whose wife or 
husband was not enumerated as a member of the same 
household, excluding separated. Included is any person 
whose spouse was employed and living away from 
home or in an institution or absent in the Armed Forces. 

Differences between the number of currently married 
males and the number of currently married females occur 
because of reporting differences and because some hus- 
bands and wives have their usual residence in different 
areas. In sample tabulations, these differences can also 
occur because different weights are applied to the individ- 
ual's data. Any differences between the number of "now 
married, spouse present" males and females are due 
solely to sample weighting. By definition, the numbers 
would be the same. 

When marital status was not reported, it was imputed 
according to the relationship to the householder and sex 
and age of the person. (For more information on imputa- 
tion, see Appendix C, Accuracy of the Data.) 

Comparability— The 1990 marital status definitions are 
the same as those used in 1980 with the exception of the 
term "never married" which replaces the term "single" in 
tabulations. A general marital status question has been 
asked in every census since 1880. 

MOBILITY LIMITATION STATUS 

The data on mobility limitation status were derived from 
answers to questionnaire item 1 9a, which was asked of a 
sample of persons 15 years old and over. Persons were 



identified as having a mobility limitation if they had a health 
condition that had lasted for 6 or more months and which 
made it difficult to go outside the home alone. Examples of 
outside activities on the questionnaire included shopping 
and visiting the doctor's office. 

The term "health condition" referred to both physical 
and mental conditions. A temporary health problem, such 
as a broken bone that was expected to heal normally, was 
not considered a health condition. 

Comparability— This was the first time that a question on 
mobility limitation was included in the census. 



PLACE OF BIRTH 

The data on place of birth were derived from answers to 
questionnaire item 8, which was asked on a sample basis. 
The place-of-birth question asked respondents to report 
the U.S. State, commonwealth or territory, or the foreign 
country where they were born. Persons born outside the 
United States were asked to report their place of birth 
according to current international boundaries. Since numer- 
ous changes in boundaries of foreign countries have 
occurred in the last century, some persons may have 
reported their place of birth in terms of boundaries that 
existed at the time of their birth or emigration, or in 
accordance with their own national preference. 

Persons not reporting place of birth were assigned the 
birthplace of another family member or were allocated the 
response of another person with similar characteristics. 
Persons allocated as foreign born were not assigned a 
specific country of birth but were classified as "Born 
abroad, country not specified." 

Nativity — Information on place of birth and citizenship 
were used to classify the population into two major cate- 
gories: native and foreign born. When information on place 
of birth was not reported, nativity was assigned on the 
basis of answers to citizenship, if reported, and other 
characteristics. 

Native — Includes persons born in the United States, Puerto 
Rico, or an outlying area of the United States. The small 
number of persons who were born in a foreign country but 
have at least one American parent also are included in this 
category. 

The native population is classified in the following 
groups: persons born in the State in which they resided at 
the time of the census; persons born in a different State, by 
region; persons born in Puerto Rico or an outlying area of 
the U.S.; and persons born abroad with at least one 
American parent. 

Foreign Born — Includes persons not classified as "Native." 
Prior to the 1970 census, persons not reporting place of 
birth were generally classified as native. 



B-26 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



The foreign-born population is shown by selected area, 
country, or region of birth; the places of birth shown in data 
products were selected based on the number of respon- 
dents who reported that area or country of birth. 

Comparability— Data on the State of birth of the native 
population have been collected in each census beginning 
with that of 1850. Similar data were shown in tabulations 
for the 1 980 census and other recent censuses. Nonre- 
sponse was allocated in a similar manner in 1980; how- 
ever, prior to 1980, nonresponse to the place of birth 
question was not allocated. Prior to the 1970 census, 
persons not reporting place of birth were generally classi- 
fied as native. 

The questionnaire instruction to report mother's State of 
residence instead of the person's actual State of birth (if 
born in a hospital in a different State) was dropped in 1 990. 
Evaluation studies of 1970 and 1980 census data demon- 
strated that this instruction was generally either ignored or 
misunderstood. Since the hospital and the mother's resi- 
dence is in the same State for most births, this change may 
have a slight effect on State of birth data for States with 
large metropolitan areas that straddle State lines. 

POVERTY STATUS IN 1989 

The data on poverty status were derived from answers 
to the same questions as the income data, questionnaire 
items 32 and 33. (For more information, see the discussion 
under "Income in 1989.") Poverty statistics presented in 
census publications were based on a definition originated 
by the Social Security Administration in 1964 and subse- 
quently modified by Federal interagency committees in 
1 969 and 1 980 and prescribed by the Office of Manage- 
ment and Budget in Directive 14 as the standard to be 
used by Federal agencies for statistical purposes. 

At the core of this definition was the 1 961 economy food 
plan, the least costly of four nutritionally adequate food 
plans designed by the Department of Agriculture. It was 
determined from the Agriculture Department's 1955 survey 
of food consumption that families of three or more persons 
spend approximately one-third of their income on food; 
hence, the poverty level for these families was set at three 
times the cost of the economy food plan. For smaller 
families and persons living alone, the cost of the economy 
food plan was multiplied by factors that were slightly higher 
to compensate for the relatively larger fixed expenses for 
these smaller households. 

The income cutoffs used by the Census Bureau to 
determine the poverty status of families and unrelated 
individuals included a set of 48 thresholds arranged in a 
two-dimensional matrix consisting of family size (from one 
person to nine or more persons) cross-classified by pres- 
ence and number of family members under 18 years old 
(from no children present to eight or more children present). 
Unrelated individuals and two-person families were further 
differentiated by age of the householder (under 65 years 
old and 65 years old and over). 

DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



The total income of each family or unrelated individual in 
the sample was tested against the appropriate poverty 
threshold to determine the poverty status of that family or 
unrelated individual. If the total income was less than the 
corresponding cutoff, the family or unrelated individual was 
classified as "below the poverty level." The number of 
persons below the poverty level was the sum of the 
number of persons in families with incomes below the 
poverty level and the number of unrelated individuals with 
incomes below the poverty level. 

The poverty thresholds are revised annually to allow for 
changes in the cost of living as reflected in the Consumer 
Price Index. The average poverty threshold for a family of 
four persons was $12,674 in 1989. (For more information, 
see table A below.) Poverty thresholds were applied on a 
national basis and were not adjusted for regional, State or 
local variations in the cost of living. For a detailed discus- 
sion of the poverty definition, see U.S. Bureau of the 
Census, Current Population Reports, Series P-60, No. 171, 
Poverty in the United States: 1988 and 1989. 

Persons for Whom Poverty Status is Determined— 

Poverty status was determined for all persons except 
institutionalized persons, persons in military group quarters 
and in college dormitories, and unrelated individuals under 
15 years old. These groups also were excluded from the 
denominator when calculating poverty rates. 

Specified Poverty Levels— Since the poverty levels cur- 
rently in use by the Federal Government do not meet all 
the needs of data users, some of the data are presented 
for alternate levels. These specified poverty levels are 
obtained by multiplying the income cutoffs at the poverty 
level by the appropriate factor. For example, the average 
income cutoff at 125 percent of poverty level was $15,843 
($12,674 x 1.25) in 1989 for a family of four persons. 

Weighted Average Thresholds at the Poverty 
Level— The average thresholds shown in the first column 
of table A are weighted by the presence and number of 
children. For example, the weighted average threshold for 
a given family size is obtained by multiplying the threshold 
for each presence and number of children category within 
the given family size by the number of families in that 
category. These products are then aggregated across the 
entire range of presence and number of children catego- 
ries, and the aggregate is divided by the total number of 
families in the group to yield the weighted average thresh- 
old at the poverty level for that family size. 

Since the basic thresholds used to determine the pov- 
erty status of families and unrelated individuals are applied 
to all families and unrelated individuals, the weighted 
average poverty thresholds are derived using all families 
and unrelated individuals rather than just those classified 
as being below the poverty level. To obtain the weighted 
poverty thresholds for families and unrelated individuals 
below alternate poverty levels, the weighted thresholds 

B-27 



HHRHHHan 



maiumumn 



shown in table A may be multiplied directly by the appro- 
priate factor. The weighted average thresholds presented 
in the table are based on the March 1990 Current Popu- 
lation Survey. However, these thresholds would not differ 
significantly from those based on the 1990 census. 

Income Deficit— Represents the difference between the 
total income of families and unrelated individuals below the 
poverty level and their respective poverty thresholds. In 
computing the income deficit, families reporting a net 
income loss are assigned zero dollars and for such cases 
the deficit is equal to the poverty threshold. 

This measure provided an estimate of the amount which 
would be required to raise the incomes of all poor families 
and unrelated individuals to their respective poverty thresh- 
olds. The income deficit is thus a measure of the degree of 
impoverishment of a family or unrelated individual. How- 
ever, caution must be used in comparing the average 
deficits of families with different characteristics. Apparent 
differences in average income deficits may, to some 
extent, be a function of differences in family size. 

Mean Income Deficit— Represents the amount obtained 
by dividing the total income deficit of a group below the 
poverty level by the number of families (or unrelated 
individuals) in that group. 

Comparability— The poverty definition used in the 1990 
and 1980 censuses differed slightly from the one used in 
the 1970 census. Three technical modifications were 
made to the definition used in the 1 970 census as described 
below: 

1. The separate thresholds for families with a female 
householder with no husband present and all other 
families were eliminated. For the 1980 and 1990 
censuses, the weighted average of the poverty thresh- 
olds for these two types of families was applied to all 
types of families, regardless of the sex of the house- 
holder. 



2. Farm families and farm unrelated individuals no longer 
had a set of poverty thresholds that were lower than 
the thresholds applied to nonfarm families and unre- 
lated individuals. The farm thresholds were 85 percent 
of the corresponding levels for nonfarm families in the 
1 970 census. The same thresholds were applied to all 
families and unrelated individuals regardless of resi- 
dence in 1980 and 1990. 

3. The thresholds by size of family were extended from 
seven or more persons in 1970 to nine or more 
persons in 1980 and 1990. 

These changes resulted in a minimal increase in the 
number of poor at the national level. For a complete 
discussion of these modifications and their impact, see the 
Current Population Reports, Series P-60, No. 133. 

The population covered in the poverty statistics derived 
from the 1980 and 1990 censuses was essentially the 
same as in the 1970 census. The only difference was that 
in 1980 and 1990, unrelated individuals under 15 years old 
were excluded from the poverty universe, while in 1970, 
only those under 14 years old were excluded. The poverty 
data from the 1960 census excluded all persons in group 
quarters and included all unrelated individuals regardless 
of age. It was unlikely that these differences in population 
coverage would have had significant impact when compar- 
ing the poverty data for persons since the 1960 censuses. 

Current Population Survey— Because of differences in 
the questionnaires and data collection procedures, esti- 
mates of the number of persons below the poverty level 
by various characteristics from the 1990 census may 
differ from those reported in the March 1990 Current 
Population Survey. 

RACE 

The data on race were derived from answers to ques- 
tionnaire item 4, which was asked of all persons. The 
concept of race as used by the Census Bureau reflects 



Table A. Poverty Thresholds in 1989 by Size of Family and Number of Related Children Under 18 Years 



Size of Family Unit 



One person (unrelated individual). 

Under 65 years 

65 years and over 

Two persons 

Householder under 65 years. . , 
Householder 65 years and 
over 

Three persons 

Four persons 

Five persons 

Six persons 

Seven persons 

Eight persons 

Nine or more persons 



Weighted 
average 
thresh- 
olds 



$6,310 
6 451 
5,947 

8,076 
8,343 

7,501 

9,885 
12,674 
14,990 
16,921 
19,162 
21,328 
25,480 



Related children under 18 years 



None 



$6,451 
5,947 

8,303 

7,495 

9,699 
12,790 
15,424 
17,740 
20,412 
22,830 
27,463 



One 



$8,547 

8,515 

9,981 
12,999 
15,648 
17,811 
20,540 
23,031 
27,596 



Two 



$9,990 
12,575 
15,169 
17,444 
20,101 
22,617 
27,229 



Three 



$12,619 
14,798 
17,092 
19,794 
22,253 
26,921 



Four 



$14,572 
16,569 
19,224 
21,738 
26,415 



Five 



$16,259 
18,558 
21,084 
25,719 



Six 



$17,828 
20,403 
25,089 



Seven 



$20,230 
24,933 



Eight or 
more 



$23,973 



B-28 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



self-identification; it does not denote any clear-cut scien- 
tific definition of biological stock. The data for race repre- 
sent self-classification by people according to the race 
with which they most closely identify. Furthermore, it is 
recognized that the categories of the race item include 
both racial and national origin or socio-cultural groups. 

During direct interviews conducted by enumerators, if a 
person could not provide a single response to the race 
question, he or she was asked to select, based on 
self-identification, the group which best described his or 
her racial identity. If a person could not provide a single 
race response, the race of the mother was used. If a single 
race response could not be provided for the person's 
mother, the first race reported by the person was used. In 
all cases where occupied housing units, households, or 
families are classified by race, the race of the householder 
was used. 

The racial classification used by the Census Bureau 
generally adheres to the guidelines in Federal Statistical 
Directive No. 15, issued by the Office of Management and 
Budget, which provides standards on ethnic and racial 
categories for statistical reporting to be used by all Federal 
agencies. The racial categories used in the 1990 census 
data products are provided below. 

White — Includes persons who indicated their race as 
"White" or reported entries such as Canadian, German, 
Italian, Lebanese, Near Easterner, Arab, or Polish. 

Black — Includes persons who indicated their race as 
"Black or Negro" or reported entries such as African 
American, Afro-American, Black Puerto Rican, Jamaican, 
Nigerian, West Indian, or Haitian. 

American Indian, Eskimo, or Aleut— Includes persons 
who classified themselves as such in one of the specific 
race categories identified below. 

American Indian — Includes persons who indicated their 
race as "American Indian," entered the name of an 
Indian tribe, or reported such entries as Canadian 
Indian, French-American Indian, or Spanish-American 
Indian. 

American Indian Tribe — Persons who identified them- 
selves as American Indian were asked to report their 
enrolled or principal tribe. Therefore, tribal data in 
tabulations reflect the written tribal entries reported 
on the questionnaires. Some of the entries (for 
example, Iroquois, Sioux, Colorado River, and Flat- 
head) represent nations or reservations. 

The information on tribe is based on self-identification 
and therefore does not reflect any designation of 
Federally- or State-recognized tribe. Information on 
American Indian tribes is presented in summary tape 
files and special data products. The information is 
derived from the American Indian Detailed Tribal 



Classification List for the 1990 census. The classifi- 
cation list represents all tribes, bands, and clans that 
had a specified number of American Indians reported 
on the census questionnaire. 

Eskimo — Includes persons who indicated their race as 
"Eskimo" or reported entries such as Arctic Slope, 
Inupiat, and Yupik. 

Aleut— Includes persons who indicated their race as 
"Aleut" or reported entries such as Alutiiq, Egegik, and 
Pribilovian. 

Asian or Pacific Islander— Includes persons who reported 
in one of the Asian or Pacific Islander groups listed on the 
questionnaire or who provided write-in responses such as 
Thai, Nepali, or Tongan. A more detailed listing of the 
groups comprising the Asian or Pacific Islander population 
is presented in figure 2 below. In some data products, 
information is presented separately for the Asian popula- 
tion and the Pacific Islander population. 

Asian— Includes "Chinese," "Filipino," "Japanese," "Asian 
Indian," "Korean," "Vietnamese," and "Other Asian." In 
some tables, "Other Asian" may not be shown separately, 
but is included in the total Asian population. 

Chinese— Includes persons who indicated their race as 
"Chinese" or who identified themselves as Cantonese, 
Tibetan, or Chinese American. In standard census reports, 
persons who reported as "Taiwanese" or "Formosan" 
are included here with Chinese. In special reports on the 
Asian or Pacific Islander population, information on 
persons who identified themselves as Taiwanese are 
shown separately. 

Filipino— Includes persons who indicated their race as 
"Filipino" or reported entries such as Philipino, Philipine, 
or Filipino American. 

Japanese— \r\c\uties persons who indicated their race 
as "Japanese" and persons who identified themselves 
as Nipponese or Japanese American. 

Asian Indian— Includes persons who indicated their 
race as "Asian Indian" and persons who identified 
themselves as Bengalese, Bharat, Dravidian, East Indian, 
or Goanese. 

Korean— Includes persons who indicated their race as 
"Korean" and persons who identified themselves as 
Korean American. 

Vietnamese— Includes persons who indicated their race 
as "Vietnamese" and persons who identified them- 
selves as Vietnamese American. 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



B-29 



Cambodian — Includes persons who provided a write-in 
response such as Cambodian or Cambodia. 

Hmong — Includes persons who provided a write-in response 
such as Hmong, Laohmong, or Mong. 

Laotian— Includes persons who provided a write-in response 
such as Laotian, Laos, or Lao. 

Thai— Includes persons who provided a write-in response 
such as Thai, Thailand, or Siamese. 

Other Asian— Includes persons who provided a write-in 
response of Bangladeshi, Burmese, Indonesian, Paki- 
stani, Sri Lankan, Amerasian, or Eurasian. See figure 2 
for other groups comprising "Other Asian." 



Pacific Islander— Includes persons who indicated their 
race as "Pacific Islander" by classifying themselves into 
one of the following groups or identifying themselves as 
one of the Pacific Islander cultural groups of Polynesian, 
Micronesian, or Melanesian. 

Hawaiian— Includes persons who indicated their race as 
"Hawaiian" as well as persons who identified them- 
selves as Part Hawaiian or Native Hawaiian. 

Samoan— Includes persons who indicated their race as 
"Samoan" or persons who identified themselves as 
American Samoan or Western Samoan. 

Guamanian— Includes persons who indicated their race 
as "Guamanian" or persons who identified themselves 
as Chamorro or Guam. 

Other Pacific Islander— Includes persons who provided 
a write-in response of a Pacific Islander group such as 
Tahitian, Northern Mariana Islander, Palauan, Fijian, or 
a cultural group such as Polynesian, Micronesian, or 
Melanesian. See figure 2 for other groups comprising 
"Other Pacific Islander." 

Other Race— Includes all other persons not included in 
the "White," "Black," "American Indian, Eskimo, or Aleut," 
and the "Asian or Pacific Islander" race categories described 
above. Persons reporting in the "Other race" category and 
providing write-in entries such as multiracial, multiethnic, 
mixed, interracial, Wesort, or a Spanish/Hispanic origin 
group (such as Mexican, Cuban, or Puerto Rican) are 
included here. 

Written entries to three categories on the race item— 
"Indian (Amer.)," "Other Asian or Pacific Islander (API)," 
and "Other race"— were reviewed, edited, and coded by 
subject matter specialists. (For more information on the 
coding operation, see the section below that discusses 
"Comparability.") 



B-30 



The written entries under "Indian (Amer.)" and "Other 
Asian or Pacific Islander (API)" were reviewed and coded 
during 100-percent processing of the 1990 census ques- 
tionnaires. A substantial portion of the entries for the 
"Other race" category also were reviewed, edited, and 
coded during the 100-percent processing. The remaining 
entries under "Other race" underwent review and coding 
during sample processing. Most of the written entries 
reviewed and coded during sample processing were those 
indicating Hispanic origin such as Mexican, Cuban, or 
Puerto Rican. 

If the race entry for a member of a household was 
missing on the questionnaire, race was assigned based 
upon the reported entries of race by other household 
members using specific rules of precedence of household 
relationship. For example, if race was missing for the 
daughter of the householder, then the race of her mother 
(as female householder or female spouse) would be 
assigned. If there was no female householder or spouse in 
the household, the daughter would be assigned her father's 
(male householder) race. If race was not reported for 
anyone in the household, the race of a householder in a 
previously processed household was assigned. This pro- 
cedure is a variation of the general imputation procedures 
described in Appendix C, Accuracy of the Data. 



Limitation of the Data — In the 1980 census, a relatively 
high proportion (20 percent) of American Indians did not 
report any tribal entry in the race item. Evaluation of the 
pre-census tests indicated that changes made for the 1 990 
race item should improve the reporting of tribes in the rural 
areas (especially on reservations) for the 1990 census. 
The results for urban areas were inconclusive. Also, the 
precensus tests indicated that there may be overreporting 
of the Cherokee tribe. An evaluation of 1980 census data 
showed overreporting of Cherokee in urban areas or areas 
where the number of American Indians was sparse. 

In the 1990 census, respondents sometimes did not fill 
in a circle or filled the "Other race" circle and wrote in a 
response, such as Arab, Polish, or African American in the 
shared write-in box for "Other race" and "Other API" 
responses. During the automated coding process, these 
responses were edited and assigned to the appropriate 
racial designation. Also, some Hispanic origin persons did 
not fill in a circle, but provided entries such as Mexican or 
Puerto Rican. These persons were classified in the "Other 
race" category during the coding and editing process. 
There may be some minor differences between sample 
data and 100-percent data because sample processing 
included additional edits not included in the 100-percent 
processing. 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 






Figure 2. Asian or Pacific Islander Groups Reported 
in the 1990 Census 



Asian 


Pacific Islander 


Chinese 


Hawaiian 


Filipino 


Samoan 


Japanese 


Guamanian 


Asian Indian 


Other Pacific Islander 1 


Korean 


Carolinian 


Vietnamese 


Fijian 


Cambodian 


Kosraean 


Hmong 


Melanesian 3 


Laotian 


Micronesian 3 


Thai 


Northern Mariana Islander 


Other Asian 1 


Palauan 


Bangladeshi 


Papua New Guinean 


Bhutanese 


Ponapean (Pohnpeian) 


Borneo 


Polynesian 3 


Burmese 


Solomon Islander 


Celebesian 


Tahitian 


Ceram 


Tarawa Islander 


Indochinese 


Tokelauan 


Indonesian 


Tongan 


Iwo-Jiman 


Trukese (Chuukese) 


Javanese 


Yapese 


Malayan 


Pacific Islander, not specified 


Maldivian 




Nepali 




Okinawan 




Pakistani 




Sikkim 




Singaporean 




Sri Lankan 




Sumatran 




Asian, not specified 2 





1 1n some data products, specific groups listed under "Other Asian" or 
"Other Pacific Islander" are shown separately. Groups not shown are 
tabulated as "All other Asian" or "All other Pacific Islander," respectively. 

includes entries such as Asian American, Asian, Asiatic, Amerasian, 
and Eurasian. 

Polynesian, Micronesian, and Melanesian are Pacific Islander cultural 
groups. 

Comparability— Differences between the 1990 census 
and earlier censuses affect the comparability of data for 
certain racial groups and American Indian tribes. The 1990 
census was the first census to undertake, on a 100- 
percent basis, an automated review, edit, and coding 
operation for written responses to the race item. The 
automated coding system used in the 1990 census greatly 
reduced the potential for error associated with a clerical 
review. Specialists with a thorough knowledge of the race 
subject matter reviewed, edited, coded, and resolved 
inconsistent or incomplete responses. In the 1980 census, 
there was only a limited clerical review of the race responses 
on the 100-percent forms with a full clerical review con- 
ducted only on the sample questionnaires. 

Another major difference between the 1990 and pre- 
ceding censuses is the handling of the write-in responses 
for the Asian or Pacific Islander populations. In addition to 
the nine Asian or Pacific Islander categories shown on the 
questionnaire under the spanner "Asian or Pacific Islander 
(API)," the 1990 census race item provided a new residual 
category, "Other API," for Asian or Pacific Islander per- 
sons who did not report in one of the listed Asian or Pacific 



Islander groups. During the coding operation, write-in 
responses for "Other API" were reviewed, coded, and 
assigned to the appropriate classification. For example, in 
1990, a write-in entry of Laotian, Thai, or Javanese is 
classified as "Other Asian," while a write-in entry of 
Tongan or Fijian is classified as "Other Pacific Islander." In 
the 1990 census, these persons were able to identify as 
"Other API" in both the 100-percent and sample opera- 
tions. 

In the 1980 census, the nine Asian or Pacific Islander 
groups were also listed separately. However, persons not 
belonging to these nine groups wrote in their specific racial 
group under the "Other" race category. Persons with a 
written entry such as Laotian, Thai, or Tongan, were 
tabulated and published as "Other race" in the 100- 
percent processing operation in 1980, but were reclassi- 
fied as "Other Asian and Pacific Islander" in 1980 sample 
tabulations. In 1980 special reports on the Asian or Pacific 
Islander populations, data were shown separately for 
"Other Asian" and "Other Pacific Islander." 

The 1970 questionnaire did not have separate race 
categories for Asian Indian, Vietnamese, Samoan, and 
Guamanian. These persons indicated their race in the 
"Other" category and later, through the editing process, 
were assigned to a specific group. For example, in 1970, 
Asian Indians were reclassified as "White," while Vietnam- 
ese, Guamanians, and Samoans were included in the 
"Other" category. 

Another difference between 1990 and preceding cen- 
suses is the approach taken when persons of Spanish/ 
Hispanic origin did not report in a specific race category but 
reported as "Other race" or "Other." These persons 
commonly provided a write-in entry such as Mexican, 
Venezuelan, or Latino. In the 1990 and 1980 censuses, 
these entries remained in the "Other race" or "Other" 
category, respectively. In the 1970 census, most of these 
persons were included in the "White" category. 

REFERENCE WEEK 

The data on labor force status and journey to work were 
related to the reference week; that is, the calendar week 
preceding the date on which the respondents completed 
their questionnaires or were interviewed by enumerators. 
This week is not the same for all respondents since the 
enumeration was not completed in one week. The occur- 
rence of holidays during the enumeration period could 
affect the data on actual hours worked during the refer- 
ence week, but probably had no effect on overall measure- 
ment of employment status (see the discussion below on 
"Comparability"). 

Comparability — The reference weeks for the 1990 and 
1980 censuses differ in that Passover and Good Friday 
occurred in the first week of April 1 980, but in the second 
week of April 1990. Many workers presumably took time 
off for those observances. The differing occurrence of 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



B-31 



these holidays could affect the comparability of the 1 990 
and 1 980 data on actual hours worked for some areas if 
the respective weeks were the reference weeks for a 
significant number of persons. The holidays probably did 
not affect the overall measurement of employment status 
since this information was based on work activity during 
the entire reference week. 

RESIDENCE IN 1985 

The data on residence in 1985 were derived from 
answers to questionnaire item 14b, which asked for the 
State (or foreign country), county, and place of residence 
on April 1, 1985, for those persons reporting in question 
14a that on that date they lived in a different house than 
their current residence. Residence in 1985 is used in 
conjunction with location of current residence to determine 
the extent of residential mobility of the population and the 
resulting redistribution of the population across the various 
States, metropolitan areas, and regions of the country. 

When no information on residence in 1 985 was reported 
for a person, information for other family members, if 
available, was used to assign a location of residence in 
1985. All cases of nonresponse or incomplete response 
that were not assigned a previous residence based on 
information from other family members were allocated the 
previous residence of another person with similar charac- 
teristics who provided complete information. 

The tabulation category, "Same house," includes all 
persons 5 years old and over who did not move during the 
5 years as well as those who had moved but by 1990 had 
returned to their 1985 residence. The category, "Different 
house in the United States," includes persons who lived in 
the United States in 1985 but in a different house or 
apartment from the one they occupied on April 1, 1990. 
These movers are then further subdivided according to the 
type of move. 

In most tabulations, movers are divided into three 
groups according to their 1 985 residence: "Different house, 
same county," "Different county, same State," and "Dif- 
ferent State." The last group may be further subdivided 
into region of residence in 1985. The category, "Abroad," 
includes those persons who were residing in a foreign 
country, Puerto Rico, or an outlying area of the U.S. in 
1985, including members of the Armed Forces and their 
dependents. Some tabulations show movers who were 
residing in Puerto Rico or an outlying area in 1985 sepa- 
rately from those residing in other countries. 

In tabulations for metropolitan areas, movers are cate- 
gorized according to the metropolitan status of their cur- 
rent and previous residences, resulting in such groups as 
movers within an MSA/PMSA, movers between MSA/ 
PMSA's, movers from nonmetropolitan areas to MSA/PMSA, 
and movers from central cities to the remainder of an 
MSA/PMSA. In some tabulations, these categories are 
further subdivided by size of MSA/PMSA, region of current 
or previous residence, or movers within or between central 
cities and the remainder of the same or a different MSA/PMSA. 



The size categories used in some tabulations for both 
1985 and 1990 residence refer to the populations of the 
MSA/PMSA on April 1, 1990; that is, at the end of the 
migration interval. 

Some tabulations present data on inmigrants, outmi- 
grants, and net migration. "Inmigrants" are generally defined 
as those persons who entered a specified area by crossing 
its boundary from some point outside the area. In some 
tabulations, movers from abroad are included in the num- 
ber of inmigrants; in others, only movers within the United 
States are included. 

"Outmigrants" are persons who depart from a specific 
area by crossing its boundary to a point outside it, but 
without leaving the United States. "Net migration" is 
calculated by subtracting the number of outmigrants from 
the number of inmigrants and, depending upon the partic- 
ular tabulation, may or may not include movers from 
abroad. The net migration for the area is net inmigration if 
the result was positive and net outmigration if the result 
was negative. In the tabulations, net outmigration is indi- 
cated by a minus sign (-). 

Inmigrants and outmigrants for States include only 
those persons who did not live in the same State in 1985 
and 1990; that is, they exclude persons who moved 
between counties within the same State. Thus, the sum of 
the inmigrants to (or outmigrants from) all counties in any 
State is greater than the number of inmigrants to (or 
outmigrants from) that State. However, in the case of net 
migration, the sum of the nets for all the counties within a 
State equal the net for the State. In the same fashion, the 
net migration for a division or region equals the sum of the 
nets for the States comprising that division or region, while 
the number of inmigrants and outmigrants for that division 
or region is less than the sum of the inmigrants or 
outmigrants for the individual States. 

The number of persons who were living in a different 
house in 1985 is somewhat less than the total number of 
moves during the 5-year period. Some persons in the same 
house at the two dates had moved during the 5-year period 
but by the time of the census had returned to their 1 985 
residence. Other persons who were living in a different 
house had made one or more intermediate moves. For 
similar reasons, the number of persons living in a different 
county, MSA/PMSA, or State or moving between nonmet- 
ropolitan areas may be understated. 

Comparability— Similar questions were asked on all pre- 
vious censuses beginning in 1940, except the questions in 
1950 referred to residence 1 year earlier rather than 5 
years earlier. Although the questions in the 1940 census 
covered a 5-year period, comparability with that census 
was reduced somewhat because of different definitions 
and categories of tabulation. Comparability with the 1960 
and 1970 census is also somewhat reduced because 
nonresponse was not allocated in those earlier censuses. 
For the 1980 census, nonresponse was allocated in a 
manner similar to the 1990 allocation scheme. 



B-32 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



SCHOOL ENROLLMENT AND LABOR FORCE 
STATUS 

Tabulation of data on enrollment, educational attain- 
ment, and labor force status for the population 16 to 19 
years old allows for calculation of the proportion of the age 
group who are not enrolled in school and not high school 
graduates or "dropouts" and an unemployment rate for the 
"dropout" population. Definitions of the three topics and 
descriptions of the census items from which they were 
derived are presented in "Educational Attainment," "Employ- 
ment Status," and "School Enrollment and Type of School." 
The published tabulations include both the civilian and 
Armed Forces populations, but labor force status is pro- 
vided for the civilian population only. Therefore, the com- 
ponent labor force statuses may not add to the total lines 
enrolled in school, high school graduate, and not high 
school graduate. The difference is Armed Forces. 

Comparability— The tabulation of school enrollment by 
labor force status is similar to that published in 1980 
census reports. The 1980 census tabulation included a 
single data line for Armed Forces; however, enrollment, 
attainment, and labor force status data were shown for the 
civilian population only. In 1970, a tabulation was included 
for 16 to 21 year old males not attending school. 

SCHOOL ENROLLMENT AND TYPE OF SCHOOL 

Data on school enrollment were derived from answers 
to questionnaire item 11, which was asked of a sample of 
persons. Persons were classified as enrolled in school if 
they reported attending a "regular" public or private school 
or college at any time between February 1, 1990, and the 
time of enumeration. The question included instructions to 
"include only nursery school, kindergarten, elementary 
school, and schooling which would lead to a high school 
diploma or a college degree" as regular school. Instruc- 
tions included in the 1990 respondent instruction guide, 
which was mailed with the census questionnaire, further 
specified that enrollment in a trade or business school, 
company training, or tutoring were not to be included 
unless the course would be accepted for credit at a regular 
elementary school, high school, or college. Persons who 
did not answer the enrollment question were assigned the 
enrollment status and type of school of a person with the 
same age, race or Hispanic origin, and, at older ages, sex, 
whose residence was in the same or a nearby area. 

Public and Private School— Includes persons who attended 
school in the reference period and indicated they were 
enrolled by marking one of the questionnaire categories for 
either "public school, public college" or "private school, 
private college." The instruction guide defines a public 
school as "any school or college controlled and supported 
by a local, county, State, or Federal Government." Schools 
supported and controlled primarily by religious organiza- 
tions or other private groups are defined as private. 
Persons who filled both the "public" and "private" circles 
are edited to the first entry, "public." 

DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



Level of School in Which Enrolled— Persons who were 
enrolled in school were classified as enrolled in "prepri- 
mary school," "elementary or high school," or "college" 
according to their response to question 12 (years of school 
completed or highest degree received). Persons who were 
enrolled and reported completing nursery school or less 
were classified as enrolled in "preprimary school," which 
includes kindergarten. Similarly, enrolled persons who had 
completed at least kindergarten, but not high school, were 
classified as enrolled in elementary or high school. Enrolled 
persons who reported completing high school or some 
college or having received a post-secondary degree were 
classified as enrolled in "college." Enrolled persons who 
reported completing the twelfth grade but receiving "NO 
DIPLOMA" were classified as enrolled in high school. (For 
more information on level of school, see the discussion 
under "Educational Attainment.") 

Comparability— School enrollment questions have been 
included in the census since 1840; grade attended was 
first asked in 1940; type of school was first asked in 1960. 
Before 1940, the enrollment question in various censuses 
referred to attendance in the preceding six months or the 
preceding year. In 1940, the reference was to attendance 
in the month preceding the census, and in the 1950 and 
subsequent censuses, the question referred to attendance 
in the two months preceding the census date. 

Until the 1910 census, there were no instructions limit- 
ing the kinds of schools in which enrollment was to be 
counted. Starting in 1910, the instructions indicated that 
attendance at "school, college, or any educational institu- 
tion" was to be counted. In 1930 an instruction to include 
"night school" was added. In the 1940 instructions, night 
school, extension school, or vocational school were included 
only if the school was part of the regular school system. 
Correspondence school work of any kind was excluded. In 
the 1950 instructions, the term "regular school" was 
introduced, and it was defined as schooling which "advances 
a person towards an elementary or high school diploma or 
a college, university, or professional school degree." Voca- 
tional, trade, or business schools were excluded unless 
they were graded and considered part of a regular school 
system. On-the-job training was excluded, as was nursery 
school. Instruction by correspondence was excluded unless 
it was given by a regular school and counted towards 
promotion. 

In 1960, the question used the term "regular school or 
college" and a similar, though expanded, definition of 
"regular" was included in the instructions, which continued 
to exclude nursery school. Because of the census' use of 
mailed questionnaires, the 1960 census was the first in 
which instructions were written for the respondent as well 
as enumerators. In the 1970 census, the questionnaire 
used the phrase "regular school or college" and included 
instructions to "count nursery school, kindergarten, and 
schooling which leads to an elementary school certificate, 
high school diploma, or college degree." Instructions in a 
separate document specified that to be counted as regular 

B-33 



school, nursery school must include instruction as an 
important and integral phase of its program, and continued 
the exclusion of vocational, trade, and business schools. 
The 1980 census question was very similar to the 1970 
question, but the separate instruction booklet did not 
require that nursery school include substantial instructional 
content in order to be counted. 

The age range for which enrollment data have been 
obtained and published has varied over the censuses. 
Information on enrollment was recorded for persons of all 
ages in the 1930 and 1940 and 1970 through 1990; for 
persons under age 30, in 1950; and for persons age 5 to 
34, in 1960. Most of the published enrollment figures 
referred to persons age 5 to 20 in the 1 930 census, 5 to 24 
in 1940, 5 to 29 in 1950, 5 to 34 in 1960, 3 to 34 in 1970, 
and 3 years old and over in 1980. This growth in the age 
group whose enrollment was reported reflects increased 
interest in the number of children in preprimary schools 
and in the number of older persons attending colleges and 
universities. 

In the 1950 and subsequent censuses, college students 
were enumerated where they lived while attending college, 
whereas in earlier censuses, they generally were enumer- 
ated at their parental homes. This change should not affect 
the comparability of national figures on college enrollment 
since 1940; however, it may affect the comparability over 
time of enrollment figures at sub-national levels. 

Type of school was first introduced in the 1960 census, 
where a separate question asked the enrolled persons 
whether they were in a "public" or "private" school. Since 
the 1 970 census, the type of school was incorporated into 
the response categories for the enrollment question and 
the terms were changed to "public," "parochial," and 
"other private." In the 1980 census, "private, church 
related" and "private, not church related" replaced "paro- 
chial" and "other private." 

Grade of enrollment was first available in the 1940 
census, where it was obtained from responses to the 
question on highest grade of school completed. Enumer- 
ators were instructed that "for a person still in school, the 
last grade completed will be the grade preceding the one 
in which he or she was now enrolled." From 1950 to 1980, 
grade of enrollment was obtained from the highest grade 
attended in the two-part question used to measure educa- 
tional attainment. (For more information, see the discus- 
sion under "Educational Attainment.") The form of the 
question from which level of enrollment was derived in the 
1990 census most closely corresponds to the question 
used in 1940. While data from prior censuses can be 
aggregated to provide levels of enrollment comparable to 
the 1990 census, 1990 data cannot be disaggregated to 
show single grade of enrollment as in previous censuses. 

Data on school enrollment were also collected and 
published by other Federal, State, and local government 
agencies. Where these data were obtained from adminis- 
trative records of school systems and institutions of higher 
learning, they were only roughly comparable with data from 
population censuses and household surveys because of 



differences in definitions and concepts, subject matter 
covered, time references, and enumeration methods. At 
the local level, the difference between the location of the 
institution and the residence of the student may affect the 
comparability of census and administrative data. Differ- 
ences between the boundaries of school districts and 
census geographic units also may affect these compari- 
sons. 

SELF-CARE LIMITATION STATUS 

The data on self-care limitation status were derived from 
answers to questionnaire item 1 9b, which was asked of a 
sample of persons 15 years old and over. Persons were 
identified as having a self-care limitation if they had a 
health condition that had lasted for 6 or more months and 
which made it difficult to take care of their own personal 
needs, such as dressing, bathing, or getting around inside 
the home. 

The term "health condition" referred to both physical 
and mental conditions. A temporary health problem, such 
as a broken bone that was expected to heal normally was 
not considered a health condition. 

Comparability— This was the first time that a question on 
self-care limitation was included in the census. 

SEX 

The data on sex were derived from answers to ques- 
tionnaire item 3, which was asked of all persons. For most 
cases in which sex was not reported, it was determined by 
the appropriate entry from the person's given name and 
household relationship. Otherwise, sex was imputed accord- 
ing to the relationship to the householder and the age and 
marital status of the person. For more information on 
imputation, see Appendix C, Accuracy of the Data. 

Sex Ratio— A measure derived by dividing the total num- 
ber of males by the total number of females and multiplying 
by 100. 

Comparability — A question on the sex of individuals has 
been asked of the total population in every census. 

VETERAN STATUS 

Data on veteran status, period of military service, and 
years of military service were derived from answers to 
questionnaire item 17, which was asked of a sample of 
persons. 

Veteran Status— The data on veteran status were derived 
from responses to question 17a. For census data prod- 
ucts, a "civilian veteran" is a person 16 years old or over 
who had served (even for a short time) but is not now 



B-34 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 






serving on active duty in the U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force, 
Marine Corps, or the Coast Guard, or who served as a 
Merchant Marine seaman during World War II. Persons 
who served in the National Guard or military Reserves are 
classified as veterans only if they were ever called or 
ordered to active duty not counting the 4-6 months for 
initial training or yearly summer camps. All other civilians 
16 years old and over are classified as nonveterans. 

Period of Military Service — Persons who indicated in 
question 1 7a that they had served on active duty (civilian 
veterans) or were now on active duty were asked to 
indicate in question 17b the period or periods in which they 
served. Persons serving in at least one wartime period are 
classified in their most recent wartime period. For example, 
persons who served both during the Korean conflict and 
the post-Korean peacetime era between February 1955 
and July 1964 are classified in one of the two "Korean 
conflict" categories. If the same person had also served 
during the Vietnam era, he or she would instead be 
included in the "Vietnam era and Korean conflict" cate- 
gory. The responses were edited to eliminate inconsisten- 
cies between reported period(s) of service and the age of 
the person and to cancel out reported combinations of 
periods containing unreasonable gaps (for example, a 
person could not serve during World War I and the Korean 
conflict without serving during World War II). Note that the 
period of service categories shown in this report are 
mutually exclusive. 

Years of Military Service — Persons who indicated in 
question 1 7a that they had served on active duty (civilian 
veterans) or were now on active duty were asked to report 
the total number of years of active-duty service in question 
17c. The data were edited for consistency with responses 
to question 17b (Period of Military Service) and with the 
age of the person. 

Limitation of the Data— There may be a tendency for the 
following kinds of persons to report erroneously that they 
served on active duty in the Armed Forces: (a) persons 
who served in the National Guard or military Reserves but 
were never called to active duty; (b) civilian employees or 
volunteers for the USO, Red Cross, or the Department of 
Defense (or its predecessor Departments, War and Navy); 
and (c) employees of the Merchant Marine or Public Health 
Service. There may also be a tendency for persons to 
erroneously round up months to the nearest year in 
question 17c (for example, persons with 1 year 8 months 
of active duty military service may mistakenly report "2 
years"). 

Comparability — Since census data on veterans were 
based on self-reported responses, they may differ from 
data from other sources such as administrative records of 
the Department of Defense. Census data may also differ 
from Veterans Administration data on the benefits-eligible 
population, since factors determining eligibility for veterans 
benefits differ from the rules for classifying veterans in the 
census. 



The wording of the question on veteran status (17a) for 
1990 was expanded from the veteran/not veteran ques- 
tion in 1980 to include questions on current active duty 
status and service in the military Reserves and the National 
Guard. The expansion was intended to clarify the appro- 
priate response for persons in the Armed Forces and for 
persons who served in the National Guard or military 
Reserve units only. For the first time in a census, service 
during World War II as a Merchant Marine Seaman was 
considered active-duty military service and persons with 
such service were counted as veterans. An additional 
period of military service, "September 1980 or later" was 
added in 1990. As in 1970 and 1980, persons reporting 
more than one period of service are shown in the most 
recent wartime period of service category. Question 17c 
(Years of Military Service) was new for 1990. 

WORK DISABILITY STATUS 

The data on work disability were derived from answers 
to questionnaire item 18, which was asked of a sample of 
persons 1 5 years old and over. Persons were identified as 
having a work disability if they had a health condition that 
had lasted for 6 or more months and which limited the kind 
or amount of work they could do at a job or business. A 
person was limited in the kind of work he or she could do 
if the person had a health condition which restricted his or 
her choice of jobs. A person was limited in the amount of 
work if he or she was not able to work full-time. Persons 
with a work disability were further classified as "Prevented 
from working" or "Not prevented from working." 

The term "health condition" referred to both physical 
and mental conditions. A temporary health problem, such 
as a broken bone that was expected to heal normally, was 
not considered a health condition. 

Comparability— The wording of the question on work 
disability was the same in 1990 as in 1980. Information on 
work disability was first collected in 1970. In that census, 
the work disability question did not contain a clause 
restricting the definition of disability to limitations caused 
by a health condition that had lasted 6 or more months; 
however, it did contain a separate question about the 
duration of the disability. 

WORK STATUS IN 1989 

The data on work status in 1989 were derived from 
answers to questionnaire item 31, which was asked of a 
sample of persons. Persons 16 years old and over who 
worked 1 or more weeks according to the criteria described 
below are classified as "Worked in 1989." All other 
persons 16 years old and over are classified as "Did not 
work in 1989." Some tabulations showing work status in 
1 989 include 1 5 year olds; these persons, by definition, are 
classified as "Did not work in 1989." 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



B-35 



Weeks Worked in 1989 

The data on weeks worked in 1989 were derived from 
responses to questionnaire item 31b. Question 31 b (Weeks 
Worked in 1989) was asked of persons 16 years old and 
over who indicated in question 31a that they worked in 
1989. 

The data pertain to the number of weeks during 1989 in 
which a person did any work for pay or profit (including paid 
vacation and paid sick leave) or worked without pay on a 
family farm or in a family business. Weeks of active service 
in the Armed Forces are also included. 

Usual Hours Worked Per Week Worked in 1989 

The data on usual hours worked per week worked in 
1989 were derived from answers to questionnaire item 
31c. This question was asked of persons 16 years old and 
over who indicated that they worked in 1989. 

The data pertain to the number of hours a person 
usually worked during the weeks worked in 1989. The 
respondent was to report the number of hours worked per 
week in the majority of the weeks he or she worked in 
1989. If the hours worked per week varied considerably 
during 1989, the respondent was to report an approximate 
average of the hours worked per week. The statistics on 
usual hours worked per week in 1989 are not necessarily 
related to the data on actual hours worked during the 
census reference week (question 21b). 

Persons 16 years old and over who reported that they 
usually worked 35 or more hours each week during the 
weeks they worked are classified as "Usually worked full 
time;" persons who reported that they usually worked 1 to 
34 hours are classified as "Usually worked part time." 

Year-Round Full-Time Workers— All persons 16 years 
old and over who usually worked 35 hours or more per 
week for 50 to 52 weeks in 1989. 

Number of Workers in Family in 1989— The term "worker" 
as used for these data is defined based on the criteria for 
Work Status in 1989. 

Limitation of the Data— It is probable that the number of 
persons who worked in 1989 and the number of weeks 
worked are understated since there was some tendency 
for respondents to forget intermittent or short periods of 
employment or to exclude weeks worked without pay. 
There may also be a tendency for persons not to include 
weeks of paid vacation among their weeks worked; one 
result may be that the census figures may understate the 
number of persons who worked "50 to 52 weeks." 

Comparability— The data on weeks worked collected in 
the 1990 census were comparable with data from the 
1980, 1970, and 1960 censuses, but may not be entirely 
comparable with data from the 1940 and 1950 censuses. 
Since the 1 960 census, two separate questions have been 



used to obtain this information. The first identified persons 
with any work experience during the year and, thus, 
indicated those persons for whom the questions on num- 
ber of weeks worked applied. In 1940 and 1950, however, 
the questionnaires contained only a single question on 
number of weeks worked. 

In 1970, persons responded to the question on weeks 
worked by indicating one of six weeks-worked intervals. In 
1980 and 1990, persons were asked to enter the specific 
number of weeks they worked. 

YEAR OF ENTRY 

The data on year of entry were derived from answers to 
questionnaire item 10, which was asked of a sample of 
persons. The question, "When did this person come to the 
United States to stay?" was asked of persons who indi- 
cated in the question on citizenship that they were not born 
in the United States. (For more information, see the 
discussion under "Citizenship.") 

The 1990 census questions, tabulations, and census 
data products about citizenship and year of entry include 
no reference to immigration. All persons who were born 
and resided outside the United States before becoming 
residents of the United States have a date of entry. Some 
of these persons are U.S. citizens by birth (e.g., persons 
born in Puerto Rico or born abroad of American parents). 
To avoid any possible confusion concerning the date of 
entry of persons who are U.S. citizens by birth, the term, 
"year of entry" is used in this report instead of the term 
"year of immigration." 

Limitation of the Data — The census questions on nativity, 
citizenship, and year of entry were not designed to mea- 
sure the degree of permanence of residence in the United 
States. The phrase, "to stay" was used to obtain the year 
in which the person became a resident of the United 
States. Although the respondent was directed to indicate 
the year he or she entered the country "to stay," it was 
difficult to ensure that respondents interpreted the phrase 
correctly. 

Comparability— A question on year of entry, (alternately 
called "year of immigration") was asked in each decennial 
census from 1890 to 1930, 1970, and 1980. In 1980, the 
question on year of entry included six arrival time intervals. 
The number of arrival intervals was expanded to ten in 
1990. In 1980, the question on year of entry was asked 
only of the foreign-born population. In 1990, all persons 
who responded to the long-form questionnaire and were 
not born in the United States were to complete the 
question on year of entry. 

HOUSING CHARACTERISTICS 

LIVING QUARTERS 

Living quarters are classified as either housing units or 
group quarters. (For more information, see the discussion 
of "Group Quarters" under Population Characteristics.) 



B-36 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



Usually, living quarters are in structures intended for 
residential use (for example, a one-family home, apartment 
house, hotel or motel, boarding house, or mobile home). 
Living quarters also may be in structures intended for 
nonresidential use (for example, the rooms in a warehouse 
where a guard lives), as well as in places such as tents, 
vans, shelters for the homeless, dormitories, barracks, and 
old railroad cars. 

Housing Units— A housing unit is a house, an apartment, 
a mobile home or trailer, a group of rooms or a single room 
occupied as separate living quarters or, if vacant, intended 
for occupancy as separate living quarters. Separate living 
quarters are those in which the occupants live and eat 
separately from any other persons in the building and 
which have direct access from outside the building or 
through a common hall. 

The occupants may be a single family, one person living 
alone, two or more families living together, or any other 
group of related or unrelated persons who share living 
arrangements. For vacant units, the criteria of separate- 
ness and direct access are applied to the intended occu- 
pants whenever possible. If that information cannot be 
obtained, the criteria are applied to the previous occu- 
pants. 

Both occupied and vacant housing units are included in 
the housing unit inventory, except that recreational vehi- 
cles, boats, vans, tents, railroad cars, and the like are 
included only if they are occupied as someone's usual 
place of residence. Vacant mobile homes are included 
provided they are intended for occupancy on the site 
where they stand. Vacant mobile homes on dealers' sales 
lots, at the factory, or in storage yards are excluded from 
the housing inventory. 

If the living quarters contains nine or more persons 
unrelated to the householder or person in charge (a total of 
at least 10 unrelated persons), it is classified as group 
quarters. If the living quarters contains eight or fewer 
persons unrelated to the householder or person in charge, 
it is classified as a housing unit. 

Occupied Housing Units— A housing unit is classified as 
occupied if it is the usual place of residence of the person 
or group of persons living in it at the time of enumeration, 
or if the occupants are only temporarily absent; that is, 
away on vacation or business. If all the persons staying in 
the unit at the time of the census have their usual place of 
residence elsewhere, the unit is classified as vacant. A 
household includes all the persons who occupy a housing 
unit as their usual place of residence. By definition, the 
count of occupied housing units for 100-percent tabula- 
tions is the same as the count of households or house- 
holders. In sample tabulations, the counts of household 
and occupied housing units may vary slightly because of 
different sample weighting methods. 



Vacant Housing Units — A housing unit is vacant if no one 
is living in it at the time of enumeration, unless its occu- 
pants are only temporarily absent. Units temporarily occu- 
pied at the time of enumeration entirely by persons who 
have a usual residence elsewhere also are classified as 
vacant. (For more information, see discussion under "Usual 
Home Elsewhere.") 

New units not yet occupied are classified as vacant 
housing units if construction has reached a point where all 
exterior windows and doors are installed and final usable 
floors are in place. Vacant units are excluded if they are 
open to the elements; that is, the roof, walls, windows, 
and/or doors no longer protect the interior from the 
elements, or if there is positive evidence (such as a sign on 
the house or in the block) that the unit is condemned or is 
to be demolished. Also excluded are quarters being used 
entirely for nonresidential purposes, such as a store or an 
office, or quarters used for the storage of business sup- 
plies or inventory, machinery, or agricultural products. 

Hotels, Motels, Rooming Houses, Etc. — Occupied rooms 
or suites of rooms in hotels, motels, and similar places are 
classified as housing units only when occupied by perma- 
nent residents; that is, persons who consider the hotel as 
their usual place of residence or have no usual place of 
residence elsewhere. Vacant rooms or suites of rooms are 
classified as housing units only in those hotels, motels, and 
similar places in which 75 percent or more of the accom- 
modations are occupied by permanent residents. 

If any of the occupants in a rooming or boarding house 
live and eat separately from others in the building and have 
direct access, their quarters are classified as separate 
housing units. 

Staff Living Quarters— The living quarters occupied by 
staff personnel within any group quarters are separate 
housing units if they satisfy the housing unit criteria of 
separateness and direct access; otherwise, they are con- 
sidered group quarters. 

Comparability— The first Census of Housing in 1940 
established the "dwelling unit" concept. Although the term 
became "housing unit" and the definition has been modi- 
fied slightly in succeeding censuses, the 1990 definition is 
essentially comparable to previous censuses. There was 
no change in the housing unit definition between 1980 and 
1990. 



ACREAGE 

The data on acreage were obtained from questionnaire 
items H5a and H19a. Question H5a was asked at all 
occupied and vacant one-family houses and mobile homes. 
Question H19a was asked on a sample basis at occupied 
and vacant one-family houses and mobile homes. 

Question H5a asks whether the house or mobile home 
is located on a place of 10 or more acres. The intent of this 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



B-37 



item is to exclude owner-occupied and renter-occupied 
one-family houses on 10 or more acres from the specified 
owner- and renter-occupied universes for value and rent 
tabulations. 

Question H19a provides data on whether the unit is 
located on less than 1 acre. The main purpose of this item, 
in conjunction with question H 19b on agricultural sales, is 
to identify farm units. (For more information, see discus- 
sion under "Farm Residence.") 

For both items, the land may consist of more than one 
tract or plot. These tracts or plots are usually adjoining; 
however, they may be separated by a road, creek, another 
piece of land, etc. 

Comparability— Question H5a is similar to that asked in 
1970 and 1980. This item was asked for the first time of 
mobile home occupants in 1990. Question H19a is an 
abbreviated form of a question asked on a sample basis in 
1980. In previous censuses, information on city or subur- 
ban lot and number of acres was obtained also. 

AGRICULTURAL SALES 

Data on the sales of agricultural crops were obtained 
from questionnaire item H19b, which was asked on a 
sample basis at occupied one-family houses and mobile 
homes located on lots of 1 acre or more. Data for this item 
exclude units on lots of less than 1 acre, units located in 
structures containing 2 or more units, and all vacant units. 
This item refers to the total amount (before taxes and 
expenses) received in 1 989 from the sale of crops, vege- 
tables, fruits, nuts, livestock and livestock products, and 
nursery and forest products, produced on "this property." 
Respondents new to a unit were asked to estimate total 
agricultural sales in 1989 even if some portion of the sales 
had been made by other occupants of the unit. 

This item is used mainly to classify housing units as farm 
or nonfarm residences, not to provide detailed information 
on the sale of agricultural products. Detailed information 
on the sale of agricultural products is provided by the 
Census Bureau's Census of Agriculture (Factfinder for the 
Nation: Agricultural Statistics, Bureau of the Census, 1989). 
(For more information, see the discussion under "Farm 
Residence.") 



BEDROOMS 

The data on bedrooms were obtained from question- 
naire item H9, which was asked at both occupied and 
vacant housing units. This item was asked on a sample 
basis. The number of bedrooms is the count of rooms 
designed to be used as bedrooms; that is, the number of 
rooms that would be listed as bedrooms if the house or 
apartment were on the market for sale or for rent. Included 
are all rooms intended to be used as bedrooms even if 

B-38 



they currently are being used for some other purpose. A 
housing unit consisting of only one room, such as a 
one-room efficiency apartment, is classified, by definition, 
as having no bedroom. 

Comparability—Data on bedrooms have been collected 
in every census since 1960. In 1970 and 1980, data for 
bedrooms were shown only for year-round units. In past 
censuses, a room was defined as a bedroom if it was used 
mainly for sleeping even if also used for other purposes. 
Rooms that were designed to be used as bedrooms but 
used mainly for other purposes were not considered to be 
bedrooms. A distribution of housing units by number of 
bedrooms calculated from data collected in a 1986 test 
showed virtually no differences in the two versions except 
in the two bedroom category, where the previous "use" 
definition showed a slightly lower proportion of units. 

BOARDED-UP STATUS 

Boarded-up status was obtained from questionnaire 
item C2 and was determined for all vacant units. Boarded-up 
units have windows and doors covered by wood, metal, or 
masonry to protect the interior and to prevent entry into the 
building. A single-unit structure, a unit in a multi-unit 
structure, or an entire multi-unit structure may be boarded-up 
in this way. For certain census data products, boarded-up 
units are shown only for units in the "Other vacant" 
category. A unit classified as "Usual home elsewhere" can 
never be boarded up. (For more information, see the 
discussion under "Usual Home Elsewhere.") 

Comparability— This item was first asked in the 1980 
census and was shown only for year-round vacant housing 
units. In 1990, data are shown for all vacant housing units. 

BUSINESS ON PROPERTY 

The data for business on property were obtained from 
questionnaire item H5b, which was asked at all occupied 
and vacant one-family houses and mobile homes. This 
question is used to exclude owner-occupied one-family 
houses with business or medical offices on the property 
from certain statistics on financial characteristics. 

A business must be easily recognizable from the out- 
side. It usually will have a separate outside entrance and 
have the appearance of a business, such as a grocery 
store, restaurant, or barber shop. It may be either attached 
to the house or mobile home or be located elsewhere on 
the property. Those housing units in which a room is used 
for business or professional purposes and have no recog- 
nizable alterations to the outside are not considered as 
having a business. Medical offices are considered 
businesses for tabulation purposes. 

Comparability — Data on business on property have been 
collected since 1940. 

DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 






CONDOMINIUM FEE 

The data on condominium fee were obtained from 
questionnaire item H25, which was asked at owner-occupied 
condominiums. This item was asked on a sample basis. A 
condominium fee normally is charged monthly to the 
owners of the individual condominium units by the condo- 
minium owners association to cover operating, mainte- 
nance, administrative, and improvement costs of the com- 
mon property (grounds, halls, lobby, parking areas, laundry 
rooms, swimming pool, etc.) The costs for utilities and/or 
fuels may be included in the condominium fee if the units 
do not have separate meters. 

Data on condominium fees may include real estate tax 
and/or insurance payments for the common property, but 
do not include real estate taxes or fire, hazard, and flood 
insurance for the individual unit already reported in ques- 
tions H21 and H22. 

Amounts reported were the regular monthly payment, 
even if paid by someone outside the household or remain 
unpaid. Costs were estimated as closely as possible when 
exact costs were not known. 

The data from this item were added to payments for 
mortgages (both first and junior mortgages and home 
equity loans); real estate taxes; fire, hazard, and flood 
insurance payments; and utilities and fuels to derive "Selected 
Monthly Owner Costs" and "Selected Monthly Owner 
Costs as a Percentage of Household Income in 1989" for 
condominium owners. 

Comparability— This is a new item in 1990. 

CONDOMINIUM STATUS 

The data on condominium housing units were obtained 
from questionnaire item H18, which was asked on a 
sample basis at both occupied and vacant housing units. 
Condominium is a type of ownership that enables a person 
to own an apartment or house in a development of similarly 
owned units and to hold a common or joint ownership in 
some or all of the common areas and facilities such as 
land, roof, hallways, entrances, elevators, swimming pool, 
etc. Condominiums may be single-family houses as well as 
units in apartment buildings. A condominium unit need not 
be occupied by the owner to be counted as such. A unit 
classified as "mobile home or trailer" or "other" (see 
discussion under "Units in Structure") cannot be a condo- 
minium unit. 

Limitation of the Data— Testing done prior to the 1980 
and 1990 censuses indicated that the number of condo- 
miniums may be slightly overstated. 



condominium units and the data were shown for renter- 
occupied and vacant year-round condominiums as well as 
owner occupied. In 1970 and 1980, the question on 
condominiums was asked on a 1 00-percent basis. In 1 990, 
it was asked on a sample basis. 

CONTRACT RENT 

The data on contract rent (also referred to as "rent 
asked" for vacant units) were obtained from questionnaire 
item H7a, which was asked at all occupied housing units 
that were rented for cash rent and all vacant housing units 
that were for rent at the time of enumeration. 

Housing units that are renter occupied without payment 
of cash rent are shown separately as "No cash rent" in 
census data products. The unit may be owned by friends or 
relatives who live elsewhere and who allow occupancy 
without charge. Rent-free houses or apartments may be 
provided to compensate caretakers, ministers, tenant farm- 
ers, sharecroppers, or others. 

Contract rent is the monthly rent agreed to or con- 
tracted for, regardless of any furnishings, utilities, fees, 
meals, or services that may be included. For vacant units, 
it is the monthly rent asked for the rental unit at the time of 
enumeration. 

If the contract rent includes rent for a business unit or 
for living quarters occupied by another household, the 
respondent was instructed to report that part of the rent 
estimated to be for his or her unit only. Respondents were 
asked to report rent only for the housing unit enumerated 
and to exclude any rent paid for additional units or for 
business premises. 

If a renter pays rent to the owner of a condominium or 
cooperative, and the condominium fee or cooperative 
carrying charge is also paid by the renter to the owner, the 
respondent was instructed to include the fee or carrying 
charge. 

If a renter receives payments from lodgers or roomers 
who are listed as members of the household, the respond- 
ent was instructed to report the rent without deduction for 
any payments received from the lodgers or roomers. The 
respondent was instructed to report the rent agreed to or 
contracted for even if paid by someone else such as 
friends or relatives living elsewhere, or a church or welfare 
agency. 

In some tabulations, contract rent is presented for all 
renter-occupied housing units, as well as specified renter- 
occupied and vacant-for-rent units. Specified renter-occupied 
and specified vacant-for-rent units exclude one-family houses 
on 10 or more acres. (For more information on rent, see 
the discussion under "Gross Rent.") 



Comparability — In 1970, condominiums were grouped 
together with cooperative housing units, and the data were 
reported only for owner-occupied cooperatives and con- 
dominiums. Beginning in 1980, the census identified all 



Median and Quartile Contract Rent— The median divides 
the rent distribution into two equal parts. Quartiles divide 
the rent distribution into four equal parts. In computing 
median and quartile contract rent, units reported as "No 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



B-39 



cash rent" are excluded. Median and quartile rent calcu- 
lations are rounded to the nearest whole dollar. (For more 
information on medians and quartiles, see the discussion 
under "Derived Measures.") 

Aggregate Contract Rent— To calculate aggregate con- 
tract rent, the amount assigned for the category "Less 
than $80" is $50. The amount assigned to the category 
"$1 ,000 or more" is $1 ,250. Mean contract rent is rounded 
to the nearest whole dollar. (For more information on 
aggregates and means, see the discussion under "Derived 
Measures.") 

Limitation of the Data— In the 1970 and 1980 censuses, 
contract rent for vacant units had high allocation rates, 
about 35 percent. 

Comparability — Data on this item have been collected 
since 1930. For 1990, quartiles were added because the 
range of rents and values in the United States has 
increased in recent years. Upper and lower quartiles can 
be used to note large rent and value differences among 
various geographic areas. 



A one-family unit occupied by a tenant household 
paying cash rent for land and buildings is enumerated as a 
farm residence only if sales of agricultural products from its 
yard (as opposed to the general property on which it is 
located) amounted to at least $1 ,000 in 1989. A one-family 
unit occupied by a tenant household that does not pay 
cash rent is enumerated as a farm residence if the 
remainder of the farm (including its yard) qualifies as a 
farm. 

Farm residence is provided as an independent data item 
only for housing units located in rural areas. It may be 
derived for housing units in urban areas from the data 
items on acreage and sales of agricultural products on the 
public-use microdata sample (PUMS) files. (For more 
information on PUMS, see Appendix F, Data Products and 
User Assistance.) 

The farm population consists of persons in households 
living in farm residences. Some persons who are counted 
on a property classified as a farm (including in some cases 
farm workers) are excluded from the farm population. Such 
persons include those who reside in multi-unit buildings or 
group quarters. 



DURATION OF VACANCY 

The data for duration of vacancy (also referred to as 
"months vacant") were obtained from questionnaire item 
D, which was completed by census enumerators. The 
statistics on duration of vacancy refer to the length of time 
(in months and years) between the date the last occupants 
moved from the unit and the time of enumeration. The 
data, therefore, do not provide a direct measure of the total 
length of time units remain vacant. 

For newly constructed units which have never been 
occupied, the duration of vacancy is counted from the date 
construction was completed. For recently converted or 
merged units, the time is reported from the date conver- 
sion or merger was completed. Units occupied by an entire 
household with a usual home elsewhere are assigned to 
the "Less than 1 month" interval. 

Comparability— Similar data have been collected since 
1960. In 1970 and 1980, these data were shown only for 
year-round vacant housing units. In 1990, these data are 
shown for all vacant housing units. 

FARM RESIDENCE 

The data on farm residence were obtained from ques- 
tionnaire items H19a and H19b. An occupied one-family 
house or mobile home is classified as a farm residence if: 
(1) the housing unit is located on a property of 1 acre or 
more, and (2) at least $1 ,000 worth of agricultural products 
were sold from the property in 1989. Group quarters and 
housing units that are in multi-unit buildings or vacant are 
not included as farm residences. 



Comparability— These are the same criteria that were 
used to define a farm residence in 1 980. In 1 960 and 1 970, 
a farm was defined as a place of 10 or more acres with at 
least $50 worth of agricultural sales or a place of less than 
10 acres with at least $250 worth of agricultural sales. 
Earlier censuses used other definitions. Note that the 
definition of a farm residence differs from the definition of 
a farm in the Census of Agriculture {Factfinder for the 
Nation: Agricultural Statistics, Bureau of the Census, 1989). 

GROSS RENT 

Gross rent is the contract rent plus the estimated 
average monthly cost of utilities (electricity, gas, and 
water) and fuels (oil, coal, kerosene, wood, etc.) if these 
are paid for by the renter (or paid for the renter by 
someone else). Gross rent is intended to eliminate differ- 
entials which result from varying practices with respect to 
the inclusion of utilities and fuels as part of the rental 
payment. The estimated costs of utilities and fuels are 
reported on a yearly basis but are converted to monthly 
figures for the tabulations. Renter units occupied without 
payment of cash rent are shown separately as "No cash 
rent" in the tabulations. Gross rent is calculated on a 
sample basis. 

Comparability— Data on gross rent have been collected 
since 1940 for renter-occupied housing units. In 1980, 
costs for electricity and gas were collected as average 
monthly costs. In 1990, all utility and fuel costs were 
collected as yearly costs and divided by 12 to provide an 
average monthly cost. 



B-40 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



GROSS RENT AS A PERCENTAGE OF 
HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 1989 

Gross rent as a percentage of household income in 
1989 is a computed ratio of monthly gross rent to monthly 
household income (total household income in 1989 divided 
by 12). The ratio was computed separately for each unit 
and was rounded to the nearest whole percentage. Units 
for which no cash rent is paid and units occupied by 
households that reported no income or a net loss in 1989 
comprise the category "Not computed." This item is 
calculated on a sample basis. 

HOUSE HEATING FUEL 

The data on house heating fuel were obtained from 
questionnaire item H14, which was asked at occupied 
housing units. This item was asked on a sample basis. The 
data show the type of fuel used most to heat the house or 
apartment. 

Utility Gas— Includes gas piped through underground 
pipes from a central system to serve the neighborhood. 

Bottled, Tank, or LP Gas— Includes liquid propane gas 
stored in bottles or tanks which are refilled or exchanged 
when empty. 

Fuel Oil, Kerosene, Etc.— Includes fuel oil, kerosene, 
gasoline, alcohol, and other combustible liquids. 

Wood— Includes purchased wood, wood cut by household 
members on their property or elsewhere, driftwood, saw- 
mill or construction scraps, or the like. 

Solar Energy— Includes heat provided by sunlight which is 
collected, stored, and actively distributed to most of the 
rooms. 

Other Fuel— Includes all other fuels not specified else- 
where. 

No Fuel Used— Includes units that do not use any fuel or 
that do not have heating equipment. 

Comparability— Data on house heating fuel have been 
collected since 1940. The category, "Solar energy" is new 
for 1990. 



INSURANCE FOR FIRE, HAZARD, AND FLOOD 

The data on fire, hazard, and flood insurance were 
obtained from questionnaire item H22, which was asked at 
a sample of owner-occupied one-family houses, condomin- 
iums, and mobile homes. The statistics for this item refer to 
the annual premium for fire, hazard, and flood insurance on 



the property (land and buildings); that is, policies that 
protect the property and its contents against loss due to 
damage by fire, lightning, winds, hail, flood, explosion, and 
so on. 

Liability policies are included only if they are paid with 
the fire, hazard, and flood insurance premiums and the 
amounts for fire, hazard, and flood cannot be separated. 
Premiums are included even if paid by someone outside 
the household or remain unpaid. When premiums are paid 
on other than a yearly basis, the premiums are converted 
to a yearly basis. 

The payment for fire, hazard, and flood insurance is 
added to payments for real estate taxes, utilities, fuels, and 
mortgages (both first and junior mortgages and home 
equity loans) to derive "Selected Monthly Owner Costs" 
and "Selected Monthly Owner Costs as a Percentage of 
Household Income in 1989." 

A separate question (H23d) determines whether insur- 
ance premiums are included in the mortgage payment to 
the lender(s). This makes it possible to avoid counting 
these premiums twice in the computations. 

Comparability— Data on payment for fire and hazard 
insurance were collected for the first time in 1980. Flood 
insurance was not specifically mentioned in the wording of 
the question in 1980. The question was asked only at 
owner-occupied one-family houses. Excluded were mobile 
homes, condominiums, houses with a business or medical 
office on the property, houses on 10 or more acres, and 
housing units in multi-unit buildings. In 1990, the question 
was asked of all one-family owner-occupied houses, includ- 
ing houses on 10 or more acres. It also was asked at 
mobile homes, condominiums, and one-family houses with 
a business or medical office on the property. 

KITCHEN FACILITIES 

Data on kitchen facilities were obtained from question- 
naire item H11, which was asked at both occupied and 
vacant housing units. A unit has complete kitchen facilities 
when it has all of the following: (1) an installed sink with 
piped water, (2) a range, cook top and convection or 
microwave oven, or cookstove, and (3) a refrigerator. All 
kitchen facilities must be located in the structure. They 
need not be in the same room. Portable cooking equip- 
ment is not considered a range or cookstove. An ice box is 
not considered to be a refrigerator. 

Comparability — Data on complete kitchen facilities were 
collected for the first time in 1970. Earlier censuses 
collected data on individual components, such as kitchen 
sink and type of refrigeration equipment. In 1 970 and 1 980, 
data for kitchen facilities were shown only for year-round 
units. In 1990, data are shown for all housing units, 

MEALS INCLUDED IN RENT 

The data on meals included in the rent were obtained 
from questionnaire item H7b,' which was asked of all 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



B-41 



occupied housing units that were rented for cash and all 
vacant housing units that were for rent at the time of 
enumeration. 

The statistics on meals included in rent are presented 
for specified renter-occupied and specified vacant-for-rent 
units. Specified renter-occupied and specified vacant-for- 
rent units exclude one-family houses on 10 or more acres. 
(For more information, see the discussion under "Contract 
Rent.") 

Comparability— This is a new item in 1990. It is intended 
to measure "congregate" housing, which generally is 
considered to be housing units where the rent includes 
meals and other services, such as transportation to shop- 
ping and recreation. 

MOBILE HOME COSTS 

The data on mobile home costs were obtained from 
questionnaire item H26, which was asked at owner-occupied 
mobile homes. This item was asked on a sample basis. 

These data include the total yearly costs for personal 
property taxes, land or site rent, registration fees, and 
license fees on all owner-occupied mobile homes. The 
instructions are to not include real estate taxes already 
reported in question H21. 

Costs are estimated as closely as possible when exact 
costs are not known. Amounts are the total for an entire 
12-month billing period, even if they are paid by someone 
outside the household or remain unpaid. 

The data from this item are added to payments for 
mortgages, real estate taxes, fire, hazard, and flood insur- 
ance payments, utilities, and fuels to derive selected 
monthly owner costs for mobile homes owners. 

Comparability— This item is new for 1990. 

MORTGAGE PAYMENT 

The data on mortgage payment were obtained from 
questionnaire item H23b, which was asked at owner 
occupied one-family houses, condominiums, and mobile 
homes. This item was asked on a sample basis. Question 
H23b provides the regular monthly amount required to be 
paid the lender for the first mortgage (deed of trust, 
contract to purchase, or similar debt) on the property. 
Amounts are included even if the payments are delinquent 
or paid by someone else. The amounts reported are 
included in the computation of "Selected Monthly Owner 
Costs" and "Selected Monthly Owner Costs as a Percent- 
age of Household Income in 1989" for units with a 
mortgage. 

The amounts reported include everything paid to the 
lender including principal and interest payments, real estate 
taxes, fire, hazard, and flood insurance payments, and 
mortgage insurance premiums. Separate questions deter- 
mine whether real estate taxes and fire, hazard, and flood 



insurance payments are included in the mortgage payment 
to the lender. This makes it possible to avoid counting 
these components twice in the computation of "Selected 
Monthly Owner Costs." 

Comparability — Information on mortgage payment was 
collected for the first time in 1980. It was collected only at 
owner-occupied one-family houses. Excluded were mobile 
homes, condominiums, houses with a business or medical 
office on the property, one-family houses on 10 or more 
acres, and housing units in multi-unit buildings. In 1990, the 
questions on monthly mortgage payments were asked of 
all owner-occupied one-family houses, including one-family 
houses on 10 or more acres. They were also asked at 
mobile homes, condominiums, and one-family houses with 
a business or medical office. 

The 1980 census obtained total regular monthly mort- 
gage payments, including payments on second or junior 
mortgages, from a single question. Two questions were 
used in 1990; one for regular monthly payments on first 
mortgages, and one for regular monthly payments on 
second or junior mortgages or home equity loans. (For 
more information, see the discussion under "Second or 
Junior Mortgage Payment.") 

MORTGAGE STATUS 

The data on mortgage status were obtained from ques- 
tionnaire items H23a and H24a, which were asked at 
owner-occupied one-family houses, condominiums, and 
mobile homes. "Mortgage" refers to all forms of debt 
where the property is pledged as security for repayment of 
the debt. It includes such debt instruments as deeds of 
trust, trust deeds, contracts to purchase, land contracts, 
junior mortgages and home equity loans. 

A mortgage is considered a first mortgage if it has prior 
claim over any other mortgage or if it is the only mortgage 
on tfie property. All other mortgages, (second, third, etc.) 
are considered junior mortgages. A home equity loan is 
generally a junior mortgage. If no first mortgage is reported, 
but a junior mortgage or home equity loan is reported, then 
the loan is considered a first mortgage. 

In most census data products, the tabulations for "Selected 
Monthly Owner Costs" and "Selected Monthly Owner 
Costs as a Percentage of Household Income in 1989" 
usually are shown separately for units "with a mortgage" 
and for units "not mortgaged." The category "not mort- 
gaged" is comprised of housing units owned free and clear 
of debt. 

Comparability — A question on mortgage status was included 
in the 1940 and 1950 censuses, but not in the 1960 and 
1970 censuses. The item was reinstated in 1980 along 
with a separate question dealing with the existence of 
second or junior mortgages. In 1980, the mortgage status 
questions were asked at owner-occupied one-family houses 
on less than 10 acres. Excluded were mobile homes, 



B-42 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



condominiums, houses with a business or medical office, 
houses on 10 or more acres, and housing units in multi-unit 
buildings. In 1990, the questions were asked of all one- 
family owner-occupied housing units, including houses on 
10 or more acres. They were also asked at mobile homes, 
condominiums, and houses with a business or medical 
office. 

PERSONS IN UNIT 

This item is based on the 100-percent count of persons 
in occupied housing units. All persons occupying the 
housing unit are counted, including the householder, occu- 
pants related to the householder, and lodgers, roomers, 
boarders, and so forth. 

The data on "persons in unit" show the number of 
housing units occupied by the specified number of per- 
sons. The phrase "persons in unit" is used for housing 
tabulations, "persons in households" for population items. 
Figures for "persons in unit" match those for "persons in 
household" for 100-percent data products. In sample 
products, they may differ because of the weighting 
process. 

Median Persons in Unit— In computing median persons 
in unit, a whole number is used as the midpoint of an 
interval; thus, a unit with 4 persons is treated as an interval 
ranging from 3.5 to 4.5 persons. Median persons is rounded 
to the nearest hundredth. (For more information on medi- 
ans, see the discussion under "Derived Measures.") 

Persons in Occupied Housing Units— This is the total 
population minus those persons living in group quarters. 
"Persons per occupied housing unit" is computed by 
dividing the population living in housing units by the 
number of occupied housing units. 

PERSONS PER ROOM 

"Persons per room" is obtained by dividing the number 
of persons in each occupied housing unit by the number of 
rooms in the unit. Persons per room is rounded to the 
nearest hundredth. The figures shown refer, therefore, to 
the number of occupied housing units having the specified 
ratio of persons per room. 

Mean Persons Per Room— This is computed by dividing 
persons in housing units by the aggregate number of 
rooms. This is intended to provide a measure of utilization. 
A higher mean may indicate a greater degree of utilization 
or crowding; a low mean may indicate under-utilization. 
(For more information on means, see the discussion under 
"Derived Measures.") 

PLUMBING FACILITIES 

The data on plumbing facilities were obtained from 
questionnaire item H10, which was asked at both occupied 
and vacant housing units. This item was asked on a 

DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 



sample basis. Complete plumbing facilities include hot and 
cold piped water, a flush toilet, and a bathtub or shower. All 
three facilities must be located inside the house, apart- 
ment, or mobile home, but not necessarily in the same 
room. Housing units are classified as lacking complete 
plumbing facilities when any of the three facilities are not 
present. 

Comparability— The 1990 data on complete plumbing 
facilities are not strictly comparable with the 1980 data. In 
1980, complete plumbing facilities were defined as hot and 
cold piped water, a bathtub or shower, and a flush toilet in 
the housing unit for the exclusive use of the residents of 
that unit. In 1990, the Census Bureau dropped the require- 
ment of exclusive use from the definition of complete 
plumbing facilities. Of the 2.3 million year-round housing 
units classified in 1980 as lacking complete plumbing for 
exclusive use, approximately 25 percent of these units had 
complete plumbing but the facilities were also used by 
members of another household. From 1940 to 1970, 
separate and more detailed questions were asked on 
piped water, bathing, and toilet facilities. In 1 970 and 1 980, 
the data on plumbing facilities were shown only for year- 
round units. 

POVERTY STATUS OF HOUSEHOLDS IN 1989 

The data on poverty status of households were derived 
from answers to the income questions. The income items 
were asked on a sample basis. Households are classified 
below the poverty level when the total 1 989 income of the 
family or of the nonfamily householder is below the appro- 
priate poverty threshold. The income of persons living in 
the household who are unrelated to the householder is not 
considered when determining the poverty status of a 
household, nor does their presence affect the household 
size in determining the appropriate poverty threshold. The 
poverty thresholds vary depending upon three criteria: size 
of family, number of children, and age of the family 
householder or unrelated individual for one and two- 
persons households. (For more information, see the dis- 
cussion of "Poverty Status in 1989" and "Income in 1989" 
under Population Characteristics.) 

REAL ESTATE TAXES 

The data on real estate taxes were obtained from 
questionnaire item H21 , which was asked at owner-occupied 
one-family houses, condominiums, and mobile homes. The 
statistics from this question refer to the total amount of all 
real estate taxes on the entire property (land and buildings) 
payable in 1989 to all taxing jurisdictions, including special 
assessments, school taxes, county taxes, and so forth. 

Real estate taxes include State, local, and all other real 
estate taxes even if delinquent, unpaid, or paid by some- 
one who is not a member of the household. However, 
taxes due from prior years are not included. If taxes are 
paid on other than a yearly basis, the payments are 
converted to a yearly basis. 

B-43 



^ 



The payment for real estate taxes is added to payments 
for fire, hazard, and flood insurance; utilities and fuels; and 
mortgages (both first and junior mortgages and home 
equity loans) to derive "Selected Monthly Owner Costs" 
and "Selected Monthly Owner Costs as a Percentage of 
Household Income in 1989." A separate question (H23c) 
determines whether real estate taxes are included in the 
mortgage payment to the lender(s). This makes it possible 
to avoid counting taxes twice in the computations. 

Comparability— Data for real estate taxes were collected 
for the first time in 1980. The question was asked only at 
owner-occupied one-family houses. Excluded were mobile 
homes or trailers, condominiums, houses with a business 
or medical office on the property, houses on 10 or more 
acres, and housing units in multi-unit buildings. In 1990, the 
question was asked of all one-family owner-occupied 
houses, including houses on 10 or more acres. It also was 
asked at mobile homes, condominiums, and one-family 
houses with a business or medical office on the property. 

ROOMS 

The data on rooms were obtained from questionnaire 
item H3, which was asked at both occupied and vacant 
housing units. The statistics on rooms are in terms of the 
number of housing units with a specified number of rooms. 
The intent of this question is to count the number of whole 
rooms used for living purposes. 

For each unit, rooms include living rooms, dining rooms, 
kitchens, bedrooms, finished recreation rooms, enclosed 
porches suitable for year-round use, and lodger's rooms. 
Excluded are strip or pullman kitchens, bathrooms, open 
porches, balconies, halls or foyers, half-rooms, utility rooms, 
unfinished attics or basements, or other unfinished space 
used for storage. A partially divided room is a separate 
room only if there is a partition from floor to ceiling, but not 
if the partition consists solely of shelves or cabinets. 

Median Rooms— This measure divides the room distribu- 
tion into two equal parts, one-half of the cases falling 
below the median number of rooms and one-half above 
the median. In computing median rooms, the whole num- 
ber is used as the midpoint of the interval; thus, the 
category "3 rooms" is treated as an interval ranging from 
2.5 to 3.5 rooms. Median rooms is rounded to the nearest 
tenth. (For more information on medians, see the discus- 
sion under "Derived Measures.") 

Aggregate Rooms— To calculate aggregate rooms, an 
arbitrary value of "10" is assigned to rooms for units falling 
within the terminal category, "9 or more." (For more 
information on aggregates and means, see the discussion 
under "Derived Measures.") 

Comparability— Data on rooms have been collected since 
1940. In 1970 and 1980, these data were shown only for 
year-round housing units. In 1990, these data are shown 
for all housing units. 



SECOND OR JUNIOR MORTGAGE PAYMENT 

The data on second or junior mortgage payments were 
obtained from questionnaire items H24a and H24b, which 
were asked at owner-occupied one-family houses, condo- 
miniums, and mobile homes. Question H24a asks whether 
a second or junior mortgage or a home equity loan exists 
on the property. Question H24b provides the regular 
monthly amount required to be paid to the lender on all 
second or junior mortgages and home equity loans. Amounts 
are included even if the payments are delinquent or paid by 
someone else. The amounts reported are included in the 
computation of "Selected Monthly Owner Costs" and 
"Selected Monthly Owner Costs as a Percentage of House- 
hold Income in 1989" for units with a mortgage. 

All mortgages other than first mortgages are classified 
as "junior" mortgages. A second mortgage is a junior 
mortgage that gives the lender a claim against the property 
that is second to the claim of the holder of the first 
mortgage. Any other junior mortgage(s) would be subordi- 
nate to the second mortgage. A home equity loan is a line 
of credit available to the borrower that is secured by real 
estate. It may be placed on a property that already has a 
first or second mortgage, or it may be placed on a property 
that is owned free and clear. 

If the respondents answered that no first mortgage 
existed, but a second mortgage did (as in the above case 
with a home equity loan), a computer edit assigned the unit 
a first mortgage and made the first mortgage monthly 
payment the amount reported in the second mortgage. 
The second mortgage data were then made "No" in 
question H24a and blank in question H24b. 

Comparability— The 1980 census obtained total regular 
monthly mortgage payments, including payments on sec- 
ond or junior mortgages, from one single question. Two 
questions were used in 1990: one for regular monthly 
payments on first mortgages, and one for regular monthly 
payments on second or junior mortgages and home equity 
loans. 



SELECTED MONTHLY OWNER COSTS 

The data on selected monthly owner costs were obtained 
from questionnaire items H20 through H26 for a sample of 
owner-occupied one-family houses, condominiums, and 
mobile homes. Selected monthly owner costs is the sum of 
payments for mortgages, deeds of trust, contracts to 
purchase, or similar debts on the property (including 
payments for the first mortgage, second or junior mort- 
gages, and home equity loans); real estate taxes; fire, 
hazard, and flood insurance on the property; utilities (elec- 
tricity, gas, and water); and fuels (oil, coal, kerosene, wood, 
etc.). It also includes, where appropriate, the monthly 
condominium fee for condominiums and mobile home 
costs (personal property taxes, site rent, registration fees, 
and license fees) for mobile homes. 



B-44 



DEFINITIONS OF SUBJECT CHARACTERISTICS 






In certain tabulations, selected monthly owner costs are 
presented separately for specified owner-occupied hous- 
ing units (owner-occupied one-family houses on fewer 
than 10 acres without a business or medical office on the 
property), owner-occupied condominiums, and owner-occupied 
mobile homes. Data usually are shown separately for units 
"with a mortgage" and for units "not mortgaged." 

Median Selected Monthly Owner Costs— This measure 
is rounded to the nearest whole dollar. 

Comparability — The components of selected monthly owner 
costs were collected for the first time in 1980. The 1990 
tabulations of selected monthly owner costs for specified 
owner-occupied housing units are virtually identical to 
1980, the primary difference was the amounts of the first 
and second mortgages were collected in separate ques- 
tions in 1990, while the amounts were collected in a single 
question in 1980. The component parts of the item were 
tabulated for mobile homes and condominiums for the first 
time in 1990. 

In 1980, costs for electricity and gas were collected as 
average monthly costs. In 1990, all utility and fuel costs 
were collected as yearly costs and divided by 1 2 to provide 
an average monthly cost. 

SELECTED MONTHLY OWNER COSTS AS A 
PERCENTAGE OF HOUSEHOLD INCOME IN 
1989 

The information on selected monthly owner costs as a 
percentage of household income in 1989 is the computed 
ratio of selected monthly owner costs to monthly house- 
hold income in 1989. The ratio was computed separately 
for each unit and rounded to the nearest whole percent- 
age. The data are tabulated separately for specified owner- 
occupied units, condominiums, and mobile homes. 

Separate distributions are often shown for units "with a 
mortgage" and for units "not mortgaged." Units occupied 
by households reporting no income or a net loss in 1989 
are included in the "not computed" category. (For more 
information, see the discussion under "Selected Monthly 
Owner Costs.") 

Comparability— The components of selected monthly owner 
costs were collected for the first time in 1 980. The tabula- 
tions of "Selected Monthly Owner Costs as a Percentage 
of Household Income in 1989" for specified owner-occupied 
housing units are comparable to 1980. 



of sewage by other means. A public sewer may be 
operated by a government body or by a private organiza- 
tion. A housing unit is considered to be connected to a 
septic tank or cesspool when the unit is provided with an 
underground pit or tank for sewage disposal. The category, 
"Other means" includes housing units which dispose of 
sewage in some other way. 

Comparability— Data on sewage disposal have been col- 
lected since 1940. In 1970 and 1980, data were shown 
only for year-round housing units. In 1990, data are shown 
for all housing units. 

SOURCE OF WATER 

The data on source of water were obtained from ques- 
tionnaire item H15, which was asked at both occupied and 
vacant housing units. Housing units may receive their 
water supply from a number of sources. A common source 
supplying water to five or more units is classified as a 
"Public system or private company." The water may be 
supplied by a city, county, water district, water company, 
etc., or it may be obtained from a well which supplies water 
to five or more housing units. If the water is supplied from 
a well serving four or fewer housing units, the units are 
classified as having water supplied by either an "Individual 
drilled well" or an "Individual dug well." Drilled wells or 
small diameter wells are usually less than 1-1/2 feet in 
diameter. Dug wells are usually larger than 1 -1 /2 feet wide 
and generally hand dug. The category, "Some other 
source" includes water obtained from springs, creeks, 
rivers, lakes, cisterns, etc. 

Comparability— Data on source of water have been col- 
lected since 1940. In 1